Fri Oct 12 2012

7:00 PM (Doors 6:00 PM)

Highline Ballroom

431 W. 16th Street New York, NY 10011

$30.00

All Ages

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On sale Friday, July 13th at 12PM

Special offer for American Express® Cardmembers to select Highline Ballrom Presents events. Get your ticket before the general public!

Dinner menu available. GA Standing. Limited seats available. First come, first seated. $10 min/person at tables. All ages.

Highline Ballroom
Wanda Jackson
Daniel Romano, Greg Garing

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  • Wanda Jackson

    Wanda Jackson

    Rockabilly

    Wanda Jackson was born in Oklahoma, but her father Tom — himself a country singer who quit because of the Depression — moved the family to California in 1941. He bought Wanda her first guitar two years later, gave her lessons, and encouraged her to play piano as well. In addition, he took her to see such acts as Tex Williams, Spade Cooley, and Bob Wills, which left a lasting impression on her young mind. Tom moved the family back to Oklahoma City when his daughter was 12 years old. In 1952, she won a local talent contest and was given a 15-minute daily show on KLPR. The program, soon upped to 30 minutes, lasted throughout Jackson's high school years. It's here that Thompson heard her sing. Jackson recorded several songs with the Brazos Valley Boys, including "You Can't Have My Love," a duet with Thompson's bandleader, Billy Gray. The song, on the Decca label, became a national hit, and Jackson's career was off and running. She had wanted to sign with Capitol, Thompson's label, but was turned down due to her young age, so she signed with Decca instead.

    Jackson insisted on finishing high school before hitting the road. When she did, her father became her road manager and hit the road with her. Her mother made and helped design Wanda's stage outfits. "I was the first one to put some glamour in the country music — fringe dresses, high heels, long earrings," Jackson said of these outfits. When Jackson first toured in 1955 and 1956, she was placed on a bill with none other than Elvis Presley. The two hit it off almost immediately. Jackson said it was Presley, along with her father, who encouraged her to sing rockabilly. 

    In 1956, Jackson finally signed with Capitol, a relationship that lasted until the early '70s. Her recording career bounced back and forth between country and rockabilly; she did this by often putting one song in each style on either side of a single. Jackson cut the rockabilly hit "Fujiyama Mama" in 1958, which became a major success in Japan. Her version of "Let's Have a Party," which Elvis had cut earlier, was a U.S. Top 40 pop hit for her in 1960, after which she began calling her band the Party Timers. A year later, she was back in the country Top Ten with "Right or Wrong" and "In the Middle of a Heartache." In 1965, she topped the German charts with "Santa Domingo," sung in German. In 1966, she hit the U.S. Top 20 with "The Box It Came In" and "Tears Will Be the Chaser for Your Wine." Jackson's popularity continued through the end of the decade. 

    Jackson toured regularly, was twice nominated for a Grammy, and was a big attraction in Las Vegas from the mid-'50s into the '70s. She married IBM supervisor Wendell Goodman in 1961, and instead of quitting the business — as many women singers had done at the time — Goodman gave up his job in order to manage his wife's career. He also packaged Jackson's syndicated TV show, Music Village. In 1971, Jackson and her husband became Christians, which she says saved their marriage. She released one gospel album on Capitol in 1972, Praise the Lord, before shifting to the Myrrh label for three more gospel albums. In 1977, she switched again, this time to Word Records, and released another two.

    In the early '80s, Jackson was invited to Europe to play rockabilly and country festivals and to record. She's since been back numerous times. More recently, American country artists Pam Tillis, Jann Browne, and Rosie Flores have acknowledged Jackson as a major influence. In 1995, Flores released a rockabilly album, Rockabilly Filly, and invited Jackson, her longtime idol, to sing two duets on it with her. Jackson embarked on a major U.S. tour with Flores later that year. It was her first secular tour in this country since the '70s, not to mention her first time back in a nightclub atmosphere. After releasing the critically acclaimed, "Heart Trouble", and "I Remember Elvis".. Wanda continues to tour all over the world to sold out venues. 

    In 2009 Wanda was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Bob Dylan, Elvis Costello, and Bruce Springsteen were just a few of the high-profile artists that encouraged the Hall to induct the Queen over the last few years. That year it was also announced that Jackson would start work on new recordings with Jack White. The resulting album, The Party Ain't Over, was released on January 25, 2011. It included a cover of the Bob Dylan rockabilly song, "Thunder on the Mountain" as well as a fiery cover of Amy Winehouse's hit song "You Know I'm No Good". "The Party Ain't Over" was well-received by many critics and fans all over the world.

  • Daniel Romano

    Daniel Romano

    Pop

    Daniel Romano is making country music. He is currently working on his third album, which will be released on Normaltown Records later this year. The new project follows his two critically acclaimed records Workin' for the Music Man (2010) and Sleep Beneath the Willow (2011). Romano is also a talented producer, multi-instrumentalist, visual artist, and graphic designer. A young man with an old mind and some nice suits, he has a Platinum record for his production work with City and Colour and a Juno nomination for graphic design. For the past seven years he has performed in the critically acclaimed rock band, Attack in Black.

  • Greg Garing

    Greg Garing

    Bluegrass

    The Pennsylvania-born-and-raised songwriter Greg Garing gained an appreciation for traditional country music, as well as Irish music, while growing up. However, it was seeing a performance by bluegrass legend Bill Monroe that spurred an 18-year-old Garing to leave his hometown of Erie and move to Nashville. Attempting to learn as much as possible, Garing had the opportunity to watch Monroe play often, even sitting in with him at times. He put together a band in 1993 that was playing honky tonk country when he was turned on to the music of artist like Garbage, PJ Harvey, and Tricky. Although his more traditional sound had attracted an audience and positive reviews, Garing began to incorporate more modern sounds with his earlier influences. Signed to a record deal with Atlantic, Garing released his debut, Alone (which included Mike Watt on bass), which also earned good press for its gritty, evocative style. By 2002, Garing had long since relocated to New York City where he was continuing to play.

Highline Ballroom

Wanda Jackson
Daniel Romano, Greg Garing

Fri Oct 12 2012 7:00 PM

(Doors 6:00 PM)

Highline Ballroom New York NY
Wanda Jackson, Daniel Romano, Greg Garing
  • Sorry, you missed this event.
  • Check out other similar events on TicketWeb.

$30.00 All Ages

On sale Friday, July 13th at 12PM

Special offer for American Express® Cardmembers to select Highline Ballrom Presents events. Get your ticket before the general public!

Dinner menu available. GA Standing. Limited seats available. First come, first seated. $10 min/person at tables. All ages.