Tue Apr 14 2020

8:00 PM (Doors 7:00 PM)

Soul Kitchen

219 Dauphin St. Mobile, AL 36602

$32.00 - $76.00

All Ages

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Doors open at 700 and show time at 800.

Tickets are $32 in adv and $36 day of show (if avail).  Seated Side Riser tickets are $76 (ltd qty - avail online only). 

Get adv tickets starting Friday Dec 6th at 10am at www.soulkitchenmobile.com or by calling 866.777.8932 or at Mellow Mushrooms (USA location).

Under 18 with a parent only.

All support acts are subject to change without notice.

Performing as part of the Mobile Bay Harley - Davidson Concert Series.

Theory of a Deadman has partnered with PLUS1 so that $1 from every ticket sold will go to support organizations dedicated to breaking the cycle of domestic violence and building a community free of abuse. www.plus1.org
 

TK101, Steve Hall Prod, & Soul Kitchen Present
Theory of a Deadman

  • Theory of a Deadman

    Theory of a Deadman

    Alternative Rock

    Songs make statements at just the right time. Born at the intersection of insurgency and inspiration, music props up a sounding board for the people to be heard. Theory Of A Deadman amplify this voice on their seventh full-length offering, Say Nothing [Roadrunner Records/Atlantic Worldwide]. The award-winning multi-platinum Los Angeles-based Canadian band—Tyler Connolly [lead vocals, guitar], Dave Brenner [guitar, backing vocals], Dean Back [bass], and Joey Dandeneau [drums]—flip the pulse of the world into scorching songcraft, integrating experimental vision, rock ‘n’ roll attitude, and clever pop ambition.
     
    In the midst of this storm, Connolly and Co. speak up like never before.
     
    “This album allowed me to say all of the things that were on my mind earlier, but I was too afraid to say,” the frontman admits. “Our previous material was pretty much all relationship-driven. Everything was about me being unhappy. This one was about what’s going on in the world, the state of American politics, and everything else. It was a completely different way of writing for us. I remember Dave asked me, ‘Hey dude, did you watch a lot of CNN or what?’,” he laughs.
     
    A whirlwind two years awakened this feeling in the group. After nearly two decades together, Theory landed their biggest career hit in the form of “Rx (Medicate)” from 2017’s Wake Up Call. Not only did it receive a platinum plaque, generate 100 million-plus streams, and become their third number one on the Billboard Hot Mainstream Rock Tracks chart, but it also received a nomination in the category of “Rock Song of the Year” at the iHeartRadio Music Awards.
     
    The musicians quietly reached this high watermark by remaining consistently prolific. To date, their discography encompassed the double-platinum single “Bad Girlfriend,” platinum single “Not Meant To Be,” platinum album Scars & Souvenirs, and gold singles “Angel” and “Hate My Life.” Plus, they notched two Top 10 debuts on the Billboard Top 200, namely Truth Is… [2011] and Savages [2014], as well as eight top tens on Billboard Hot Mainstream Rock Tracks Chart. In addition to selling out shows worldwide, they’ve toured with everyone from Alter Bridge and Bush to Stone Sour and Big Wreck and more.
     
    In 2018, Connolly turned his attention towards the next chapter. It started at a Los Angeles dinner with Wake Up Call producer Martin Terefe [Jason Mraz, Yungblud].
     
    “I went out to dinner before Halloween with Martin, began discussing the record, went home, and had a panic attack,” recalls Connolly. “After ‘Rx (Medicate)’, there was a lot to figure out. It was really fantastic, but I don’t think we had a lot of time to live in it and digest it. There was pressure. I was like, ‘Okay, I have to get to work’. One day when I woke up, I knew what I needed to communicate. I was motivated to talk about things I want to talk about and not just write about girls. It’s not where I was 15 years ago, but here I am now.”
     
    “What makes this record important is the content,” Brenner elaborates. “Tyler approaches some really tough topics like domestic violence and racism. We never did that in the past. ‘Rx (Medicate)’ opened the door though. This is almost a continuation. There are real discussions happening in the tracks backed by heavy stuff to make you think.”
     
    Once again, the group hopped a plane to London and worked out of Terefe’s Kensaltown studio. Staying in an Airbnb for six weeks, they pushed themselves creatively like never before, incorporating new sounds and sonics. 
     
    Theory introduce Say Nothing with the single “History Of Violence.” Finger-picked guitar by Brenner brushes up against the singer’s searing snapshot of a woman afflicted by abuse at the hands of her husband. Between sweeping strings and airy solos, Connolly sings, “She need a sedative to get her straight, ya know she need a cigarette, she got the shakes, put them sunglasses on her, hide her face, such a waste…maybe the way out is a .38.
     
    “It’s a story about a woman who gets beat by her significant other, shoots him, kills him, and goes to jail,” he explains. “Even though she’s in jail, it’s still a better place to be than being imprisoned in real life by this man. It’s very similar to stories we hear in the news all the time, unfortunately.”
     
    A pilgrimage to Abbey Road Studios left its fingerprints on “Ted Bundy.” Swaggering piano and boisterous horns resound beneath a Sgt. Peppers-gone-Silence-of-the-Lambs story.
     
    “We did a private tour of Abbey Road, and I got to play on The Beatles piano,” recalls Connolly. “We went up to the room where they played ‘A Day in the Life’. When we got back to our studio, we were so inspired. We put tuba on ‘Ted Bundy’. After six albums, we don’t want to be complacent or stale. We try different things. Lyrically, it’s funny. I watched a documentary and got inspired to write about Ted Bundy falling in love.”
     
    Elsewhere, a gospel choir kicks off “Quicksand,” adding yet another dimension to the aural palette. Meanwhile, the orchestration on “Black Hole Of Your Heart” moves in lockstep with an arena-ready beat punctuated by creaky guitar, nodding to Silverchair’s Diorama.
     
    “All around, we really pushed ourselves in terms of the sound,” adds Brenner. “It’s like we finally fit the square peg in the round hole here!”
     
    In many ways, “Strangers” encapsulates a pervasive feeling and strikes a chord with its powerful and provocative prose.
     
    “It’s about what’s going on in America with politics,” says Connolly. “You have to pick a side. It’s interesting how people stick to their party and forget the country. We’re all like strangers now. It’s gotten too nasty.”
     
    However, Theory’s music might be something everyone can ultimately agree on.
     
    “I look at the record as a microcosm of our current era,” Brenner concludes. “It’s a reminder to look inward at what’s happening and what we’re becoming. I hope everyone dives into the words. At the same time, music is still an escape. Maybe we can give the world a little solace and encourage everyone to treat each other better.”
     
    “We just want to write what speaks to us,” Connolly leaves off. “The best thing is when people sing lyrics back to you, or if a song gets somebody through a tough time. There’s something we all might be able to dig here.
     
  • 10 Years

    10 Years

    Alternative Rock

    Jesse Hasek – Vocals
    Brian Vodinh – Guitar
    Matt Wantland –  Guitar

    Sometimes when band members reunite, it’s as if no time has passed and nothing has changed. That couldn’t be further from the truth for 10 Years. And, that’s a good thing. When guitarist/drummer Brian Vodinh and guitarist Matt Wantland returned to the Knoxville, Tennessee alt-metal/post-grunge band for their eighth album and Mascot Records debut, (how to live) AS GHOSTS, they burst through their comfort zones to create something new. Something better. Something career-defining.

     “It’s funny, I named our last record, [2015’s] From Birth to Burial, because I thought it was our final record because it just didn’t feel like 10 Years without Brian and Matt. But having them back is really a reunion of the core writing team and this new record actually feels like a real rebirth for the band,” says singer Jesse Hasek.

    While Vodinh handled drums and guitar on the new album, he’s switching to just guitar for the live shows, moving Chad Huff from guitar to bass, while Kyle Mayer stays on drums. “We’re bringing it back the way they should be,” says Vodinh, who left the band due to family commitments in 2013. “It feels great to be back with these guys and we’re in such a better place musically and creatively than ever before.”

    That better place stems, in part, from a more collaborative writing process. “It used to be that just Jesse and I would write the full song, and the other guys would add a little spice to it. This time, we’re starting the writing process as a full band. Sometimes it starts with a riff. Sometimes it starts with a vocal. Our formula is no formula, and it kind of works. And, we work together in a more constructive and healthier environment now,” explains Vodinh.

    The sixth collaborator was Grammy award-winning producer Nick Raskulinecz (Alice in Chains, Foo Fighters, Deftones). “Nick made us step outside our comfort zone,” explains Hasek. “It made for a different sounding record. The one thing we never wanted to do is recreate the same thing over and over. We have always been musicians that love to explore and venture into new horizons.”

    It wasn’t easy, the band admits. “Nick threw us curve-balls and challenged us to re-write stuff and do things we normally wouldn’t have done. He helped us cut away the fat and really get to the meat and potatoes of each song. He pushed us and was challenging at times, but it helped us grow.”

    The result is 10 Years’ most dynamic and multi-dimensional record to date. Raskulinecz encouraged the band to strip away some of the vocal production they’ve grown accustomed to in order to reveal a more intimate side of Hasek. “Historically, we like to orchestrate a lot of vocal parts. We’ll have harmonies and layers. This time around, Nick had us strip a lot of that away. There are a lot of moments where the only vocal is just Jesse, and not this big freaking epic thing. It makes Jesse more human. And I think the more human Jesse comes across, the more relatable his lyrics are,” says Vodinh.

    Raskulinecz also helped Hasek be more straightforward in his lyrics and message. “In the past, I’ve written a lot of songs that were pretty ambiguous. But on this record, I’m more comfortable being direct and talking about things that are important to me. I’m older and find myself reflecting on the world more especially after having traveled the world and talk to people and really see what’s going on,” says Hasek.

    The title track, (how to live) AS GHOSTS, is one such song. “After traveling the world and seeing all the political, social, and religious turmoil, it had me thinking about how many people are judging and preparing for death, but are actually missing life. And, instead of using spirituality for good, a lot of people use it to point fingers and judge. Instead of worrying where we end up in the end, we need to focus on the now and the humanity.”

    “Burnout” is another observation on mankind. “It’s about a person that’s right there in the limelight, has every opportunity to see the greatest things in life that are right in front of them, but they are too inside themselves to see it,” says Hasek.

    “Blood Red Sky” was originally from a solo EP Vodinh had recorded. “The song grabbed my ear the first time I heard it because it had such a different vibe,” says Hasek, “but I had a different vocal idea for it so we changed it up. It’s about the struggle of maintaining everyday life and how fast your existence just flashes before your eyes. But, it also says that we are surviving and will make it through — that we will always fight through.”

    On the first single, “Novacaine,” Hasek looks inward. “Six albums and a hundred songs in, I wondered if I’ve already written my best stuff,” he admits. “But at some point, you start to get real adult problems. Life has such a numbing to it. You see people go from such optimism in their 20s to having life just beat them down later. I think we all kind of get desensitized and numb to life on some level. That’s what this song is about.”

    10 Years has come a long way since their inception in 1999. The band landed a deal with Universal/Republic Records on the strength of their two independent releases, 2001’s Into the Half Moon and 2004’s Killing All That Holds You. Their major label debut, 2005’s The Autumn Effect, debuted at No. 1 on Billboard’s Heatseekers Album chart thanks to their breakthrough hit, “Wasteland,” which topped Billboard’s Modern Rock Tracks chart, and “Through the Iris,” which hit No. 20 on Billboard Hot Mainstream Rock Tracks.

    The band followed that success with 2008’s Division, featuring co-production work from Rick Parashar (Alice In Chains, Pearl Jam). The album peaked at No. 12 on The Billboard 200 and spawned the hit “Beautiful,” which reached No. 6 on the Hot Mainstream Rock Tracks. The momentum continued with 2010’s Feeding the Wolves, which was produced by Howard Benson (My Chemical Romance, 3 Doors Down) and bowed at No. 17 on The Billboard 200, while the single, “Shoot It Out,” peaked at No. 6 on Hot Mainstream Rock Tracks and spent 25 weeks on the chart.

    The group, which toured the world with such rock greats at Linkin Park, Korn, and Deftones, went back to their indie roots with 2012’s Minus the Machine on their own Palehorse Records, which was part of Warner Music Label Group. The album debuted at No. 2 on the Hard Rock Albums chart, No. 8 on the Top Rock Albums chart, and No. 26 on The Billboard 200.

    “We self-produced our last few records, so it was good to give the reigns over to someone else for the first time in awhile. We had to really let go and trust and I think in doing that, it opened us to new ideas and helped us stretch creatively,” says Hasek.

    (how to live) AS GHOSTS might be the band’s 8th album. But, to them, it feels like a new start. “There was a heavier, darker tone to our last record because we weren’t in a good place,” adds the singer. “Ghosts has a brighter side to it because we’re all in a really happy, optimistic, and excited place about music and life. We’re ready to see how the world embraces it.”

Please correct the information below.

Select ticket quantity.

Complete the security check.

Select Tickets

limit 10 per person
General Admission
GA
$32.00
Seated Side Risers

$76.00

Delivery Method

ticketFast
Will Call
TK101, Steve Hall Prod, & Soul Kitchen Present

Theory of a Deadman

Tue Apr 14 2020 8:00 PM

(Doors 7:00 PM)

Soul Kitchen Mobile AL
Theory of a Deadman

$32.00 - $76.00 All Ages

Doors open at 700 and show time at 800.

Tickets are $32 in adv and $36 day of show (if avail).  Seated Side Riser tickets are $76 (ltd qty - avail online only). 

Get adv tickets starting Friday Dec 6th at 10am at www.soulkitchenmobile.com or by calling 866.777.8932 or at Mellow Mushrooms (USA location).

Under 18 with a parent only.

All support acts are subject to change without notice.

Performing as part of the Mobile Bay Harley - Davidson Concert Series.

Theory of a Deadman has partnered with PLUS1 so that $1 from every ticket sold will go to support organizations dedicated to breaking the cycle of domestic violence and building a community free of abuse. www.plus1.org
 

Please correct the information below.

Select ticket quantity.

Complete the security check.

Select Tickets

All Ages
limit 10 per person
General Admission
GA
$32.00
Seated Side Risers
$76.00

Delivery Method

ticketFast
Will Call