Thu Nov 14 2019

8:00 PM (Doors 7:00 PM)

Soul Kitchen

219 Dauphin St. Mobile, AL 36602

$25.00 - $45.00

Ages 18+

Share With Friends

Share
Tweet

Nate Kenyon will be performing with the Lacs and The Josephines opening.

Doors open at7:00 and show time at 8:00.

Tickets are $25 in adv and $28 day of show (if avail).  Seated Side Riser tickets are $45 (ltd qty - avail online only). 

Get adv tickets starting Friday July 20th at 10am at www.soulkitchenmobile.com or by calling 866.777.8932 or at Mellow Mushrooms (USA location).

This is an 18+ show

Performing as part of the Law Offices of Alexander Shunnarah & Assoc Concert Series.

The Lacs, Black Stone Cherry

  • The Lacs

    The Lacs

    Country

    “People still can’t figure out what to call the music we do,” said Brian ‘Rooster’ King, looking at his longtime collaborator Clay ‘Uncle Snap’ Sharpe. “We just get in there and write about what we want.”
    The duo has been together since 2000 and Outlaw, which is their fifth album since signing with Average Joe’s Entertainment, is a watershed effort from The LACS that sonically broadens their musical scope and blends together every genre from traditional country and southern rock to rap and spoken word.
    But it’s their true-to-life lyrics that paint a series of authentic compositions depicting the life of a pair of rednecks from South Georgia. “We love writing about stories that we’ve lived,” said King, of their biographical 12-song effort that could prove to be a breakthrough of sorts.
    Label it however you choose. They call it country.
    Baxley, a slow-moving rural town of just over 4,000 residents, where Sharpe grew up a country boy, is a place where everyone knows everyone else’s business and newcomers are known as outsiders. There’s one elementary school, one high school and, until recently, only three red lights. “Now we got a fourth and a Wal-Mart,” said Sharpe, “so, yeah, we’re stepping up.” Both his parents worked and, as a young boy, he’d tag along with his old man and spend summer days hanging out on construction sites, while listening to a local country radio station.
    Those early formative years is when Sharpe’s love of country music developed in the late 1980s and early 1990s. However, it wasn’t until he was 20 when a then-18 year old King moved with his family from Waycross to Baxley that The LACS first met up. They liked a lot of the same music – Garth Brooks and George Strait, Pink Floyd and Metallica along with Tupac and Nelly – and as quickly as they befriended one another they started writing lyrics as if they had been kindred spirits since childhood. King was a self-taught guitarist and the two fast-friends pooled their money together to buy a cheaper version of a beat box they still use when they perform on stage today.
    In 2001, they saved up another $2,500 to pay for 40 hours of studio time – half of which they spent recording their first self-titled album and the other half of the time was used to mix and master – and 1,000 copies of the CD to sell in parking lots and parties. Over time they built up a cult following of fellow rednecks and hillbillies and eventually drew the attention of Average Joe’s.
    Last fall they released their fourth album and this spring the prolific songsmiths are already back with yet another studio album, which features the first single God Bless a Country Girl. “It’s a fun little song,” said King. Sharpe and King have matured personally and especially professionally since the first time they plugged a $7 microphone into a boom box, which still says a lot about their authentic writing process.
    Then and now, The LACS enter the studio with half the album written and then finish the second half of the writing process while recording the first half. Their fans, who both King and Sharpe describe as rowdy, loud, hardworking rednecks, have come to expect songs about the south – beer drinking, mud bogging and more drinking – that remind them of their own lives. “Brian and I have prided ourselves on putting out real music that we lived,” Sharpe concluded, “and not just writing
    about some topic because it was a No. 1 for somebody else.”
  • Black Stone Cherry

    Black Stone Cherry

    Country

    Family comes first—you can never forget who was there with you from the start. The Edmonton, Kentucky-based rock n’ roll quartet Black Stone Cherry was raised on musical forefathers such as Cream, Led Zeppelin, Muddy Waters, and the Faces, among other 1970s staples, and, now, with its sixth album, Family Tree, BSC salutes its classic rock heritage and honors its legacy with a beast of a Southern rock n’ roll album.
    “We caught divine intervention with this one,” guitarist Ben Wells says with a good chuckle. “We hit a creative spark and tapped into a spirit and a fire we hadn’t before.” Drummer John Fred Young adds: “Family Tree showcases all of our collective musical influences and how we have taken those to create something that is truly our own unique Southern American Rock ‘N Roll Sound.”
    For 17 years, Black Stone Cherry has put forth a new vicious breed of Southern rock, injecting youthful vitality and a myriad of fresh new influences into the beloved American rock tradition. To date, the band has released five critically acclaimed albums, and one well-received blues EP. Black Stone Cherry has also rocked 12,000-cap arena shows, topped the UK charts, and shared the stage with a diverse roster of superstars, including Def Leppard, Lynyrd Skynyrd, Bad Company, Mötorhead, and ZZ Top.
    Black Stone Cherry came together in 2001 in Edmonton, Kentucky, eventually coalescing around the lineup of Chris Robertson, vocals and guitar; Ben Wells, guitar and vocals; Jon Lawhon, bass and vocals; and John Fred Young, drums. Young's dad Richard, and his Uncle Fred, are two members of the iconic country-fried rock n’ roots band The Kentucky HeadHunters, and the high school-aged boys came up honing their craft in the group’s Practice House, a 1940s bungalow.
    “We grew up in the Kentucky Headhunters’ rehearsal space, looking up at posters of Cream, Led Zeppelin, Uriah Heep, the Stones, Montrose, and the Faces. We were like kids someone took in a time capsule and put in the woods,” says drummer John Fred Young.
    Like the band’s previous album and EP, Black Stone Cherry opted to self-produce and track Family Tree at David Barrick's Barrick Recording, the same studio where BSC recorded its self-titled debut and Kentucky albums . BSC also opted to not over-rehearse in advance of the album, instead preferring the immediacy and spontaneity of in the-moment takes. “There was a lot of laughter in the studio this time, and an air of comfort because we had self-produced the last few releases. It helped us get down to the nitty gritty bones of our music,” says bassist Jon Lawhon. The band also entrusted guitarist and vocalist Chris Robertson to mix the album. This homespun approach perfectly suited the loose but epiphanic creative sessions that birthed Family Tree.
    Family Tree boasts BSC’s tried-and-true lucky number with its 13 songs, and, like all BSC releases, features songwriting contributions from each member. The result is a modern and meaty blues-based rock album, with unexpected sonic twists like punchy horn sections, barrelhouse pianos, Southern gospel organ, atmospheric synthesizer passages, and forays into funk and country.
    The title track melds brawny blues riffage with BSC’s most telepathic ensemble playing, showcasing the group’s maturation as a unit without detracting from its Southern, hard rock wallop. The album also packs some satisfyingly surprising moments. “Carry Me On Down The Road” is a sleek slice of pure 1970s American rock n’ roll—something you would hear blaring out of a 1972 Chevy El Camino. “James Brown” offers forth some stanky swamp-funk, replete with wah-wah guitars and gospel girl vocals. “Bad Habit,” however, dripping sensual innuendo hammered home by a horny groove-rock beat, delivers some prime hooky and heavy BSC.
    One Family Tree centerpiece is the rustically elegant “My Last Breath,” a sweetly downhome ode to the unbreakable bonds of family. The song’s goose bump-inducing call and response male and female vocal breakdown is one of those musical moments where light just shines through the speakers and you know everything is going to be alright.
    Two special guests bring Family Tree full circle, one being Chris’ 5 year-old son singing backup on the brawny swaggering “You Got The Blues,” and the other being jam band icon Warren Haynes’ vocal and guitar cameo on the delta stomp of “Dancing In The Rain.” The band first met Warren 17 years ago when they first came to New York to showcase for their new label. “I remember coming to New York when we first were signed, and hearing Warren’s voice behind me the minute my feet hit the street,” recalls bassist Jon Lawhon. “Hearing him play on this track all these years later gave me chills.”
    Having Warren guest on the album was a wonderful gesture of “you’re in the family now.” It was truly a validation of all the miles the band has clocked on tour, and the dues the guys have paid being away from home. “It’s amazing to me how four good old boys from nowhere Kentucky can still be around 17 years later,” singer/guitarist Chris Robertson says. Ben Wells concludes: “I don’t remember how life was outside of Black Stone Cherry. The four of us are family.”

Please correct the information below.

Select ticket quantity.

Complete the security check.

Select Tickets

limit 10 per person
General Admission

$25.00
Seated Side Risers

$45.00

Delivery Method

ticketFast
Will Call

Terms & Conditions

This event is 18 and over. Any Ticket holder unable to present valid identification indicating that they are at least 18 years of age will not be admitted to this event, and will not be eligible for a refund.

The Lacs, Black Stone Cherry

Thu Nov 14 2019 8:00 PM

(Doors 7:00 PM)

Soul Kitchen Mobile AL
The Lacs, Black Stone Cherry

$25.00 - $45.00 Ages 18+

Nate Kenyon will be performing with the Lacs and The Josephines opening.

Doors open at7:00 and show time at 8:00.

Tickets are $25 in adv and $28 day of show (if avail).  Seated Side Riser tickets are $45 (ltd qty - avail online only). 

Get adv tickets starting Friday July 20th at 10am at www.soulkitchenmobile.com or by calling 866.777.8932 or at Mellow Mushrooms (USA location).

This is an 18+ show

Performing as part of the Law Offices of Alexander Shunnarah & Assoc Concert Series.

Please correct the information below.

Select ticket quantity.

Complete the security check.

Select Tickets

Ages 18+
limit 10 per person
General Admission
$25.00
Seated Side Risers
$45.00

Delivery Method

ticketFast
Will Call

Terms & Conditions

This event is 18 and over. Any Ticket holder unable to present valid identification indicating that they are at least 18 years of age will not be admitted to this event, and will not be eligible for a refund.