The Devil Wears Prada, Veil Of Maya, Silent Planet, Thousand Below

Sat Nov 4 2017

6:15 PM (Doors 6:00 PM)

Bottom Lounge

1375 W. Lake St Chicago, IL 60607

$23.00

All Ages

Share With Friends

The Devil Wears Prada
Veil Of Maya, Silent Planet, Thousand Below

  • Sorry, you missed this event.
  • Check out other similar events on TicketWeb.
  • The Devil Wears Prada

    The Devil Wears Prada

    Progressive Metal

    The Devil Wears Prada is the musical embodiment of a generational shift. Built on a diverse array of heavy, dark, melodic and genre-defying music; hardened and sharpened by putting in road work together since the days when they had to skip class to tour: The Devil Wears Prada is at the forefront of a movement that bridges the gap between Rockstar Mayhem and the Vans Warped Tour.

    The passionately inspired band’s album for Roadrunner Records, cryptically titled 8:18, embodies an unflinching, uncompromising authenticity born from revelatory introspection and obsessive workmanship. The dichotomies are refreshing, invigorating and boundless. There’s an oppressive, suffocating darkness to their heavy music, counterbalanced by the hope within their collective faith. The most brutal of crowd-moving breakdowns ignite with friction, bristling against soaring melodies, progressive yet catchy riffing and keyboard soaked atmospheric esotericism. To put it simply: The Devil Wears Prada have developed the chops, the cred and the audience of a true-blue thinking person’s heavy metal band, while simultaneously welcoming fist-pumping hellraisers and youthful moshers alike. 8:18 continues the war against humanity’s dark urges, pointing the finger inward and outward through a medium that is itself both bleak and grand.

    "Much of the heavy music around us suffers from a total lack of emotion. It's sort of losing an audible sense of sincerity," observes vocalist Mike Hranica. "The guitars, the drums, the songs themselves create that sorrow that I want the lyrics to tell on 8:18. And I made sure that my vocals created emotions that I have heard in post-hardcore, but that I rarely hear in breakdown-heavy metal bands like us."

    The overriding theme on 8:18 is misery, exploring that mental and emotional state through its various guises, manifestations and interpretations. Tracks like Gloom, War, Black & Blue and Home for Grave spring forth from that foundation, exploiting concepts like mediocrity, existential angst and life's bigger questions under an atmosphere of musical dread, hostility and darkness.

    Mike Hranica is blessed with a commanding roar, but infuses the proceedings with a literary sensibility, a commitment to self-evaluation and a painstaking modesty that levels the playing field between performer and listener beneath the surface.

    Rhythm guitarist Jeremy DePoyster contributes the hook-laden underbelly to Prada’s brutal musical beast, handling the “clean” singing with a fine-tuned abandon to rival the pop stars dominating the charts. He grew up listening to Rob Zombie and Korn, but his iPod these days is packed with just about everything one can name. His singing vocals shine particularly on 'Care More,' a heavily electronics infused song with a dark mood. "There's so much of this crappy auto-tuned singing thing happening right now. It's disappointing to me because I've been singing since I was a kid," DePoyster says. "We all know what auto-tune is and we all use it to get things to work a little better, but when I hear things that are using it just as a crutch, that is extremely disappointing to me. Mike does a lot of passionate, raw, vibey screaming on this record, too. It's great."

    Andy Trick has a Minor Threat-inspired tattoo that exhibits his early inclinations toward hardcore punk, an ethos and a mindset that still courses through the bass player’s veins even as he takes the stage playing guitar-driven metal music around the world. His bass playing anchors the theatrics and fluid, tasteful beats of Daniel Williams. Prada’s drummer carries the class and finesse of the indie crowd, while pummeling the drums with the power of metal's finest. "Since the beginning, we have liked breakdowns, we have liked heavy sounds, we have liked melodic singing, we have liked heavy metal in general," notes Hranica. "Those are the most basic fundamentals of what this band has been about."

    The overseeing hand of executive producer and Killswitch Engage axeman Adam Dutkiewicz (August Burns Red, Shadows Fall, Parkway Drive) and producer Matt Goldman (Underoath, The Chariot, As Cities Burn) resulted in a sonic time capsule representing not only this present moment for TDWP, but a crossroads for heavy music itself. Progressive strains of experimental trailblazers Converge, Botch and Underoath seep beneath The Devil Wears Prada’s unique reverse-engineering of modern metal. 8:18 convincingly detours into Nine Inch Nails-isms, then comes full circle with some killer throwbacks to TDWP's earliest work.

    "We love a lot of the records Matt has made and obviously we love Adam and he's a great friend," DePoyster points out. "Adam was very involved in doing the vocal stuff with Mike and I and had given us ideas when we were making demos. Both of those guys were great with us and were able to make contributions and make us think about things in different ways without making us uncomfortable.

    With 8:18, The Devil Wears Prada cement their status as a band who have not only weathered the pressures of early, youthful popularity, but grown into masters of their craft. From album packaging to merchandising, from video production to stage lighting, The Devil Wears Prada are hands-on and pay excruciating attention to detail to ensure they always deliver their best, that their overwhelming passion will endure. They push themselves to create a lasting work that inspires, empowers and challenges, in equal measure.

    "We're not kids who just want to hit the road and see where this goes," adds DePoyster. "We're making a conscious choice to do this because we love it."

    The Devil Wears Prada are unwavering in their commitment to each other, their fans, their art, their higher calling toward truth and to their desire to engage. The emotion remains sincere, the musicianship supreme.

  • Veil Of Maya

    Veil Of Maya

    Heavy Metal

    The Chicago based VEIL OF MAYA have definitely taken the hard road to success grinding it out on the road through countless tours over the years, but now that backbreaking schedule is paying off tenfold. This quartet are one of the few very bands that can authentically mix elements of progressive metal, melodic death metal, thrash and hardcore brutality together effectively, all while keeping the listener constantly interested with baited breath wondering just what is coming next. This is exactly why they will have a career for years to come.

    With their third full-length album, Eclipse, they continued to blend Meshuggah-esque riffs, shreddy solos and haunting melodies into a compelling package that garnered high acclaim from fans and media alike. With his overflowing riff bank in hand, the group have continued to churn out new material that has ultimately resulted in the new tracks featured on this much anticipated new EP release. The results are even more jagged and heterogenous with dizzying guitar savagery, jazz chords and fragmented leads congealing in a swarm of blast beats.

    VEIL OF MAYA are firing on all cylinders and remain one of the top artists within the genre never adhering to any preconceived ideals further pushing the envelope with each new track they create.

  • Silent Planet

    Silent Planet

    Christian Metal

    Humanity has always had a therapeutic relationship with music. Its ability to shatter man-made walls, create a platform for expression, and illuminate perspectives, has helped ground some and liberate others. We build national anthems out of songs, we immortalize first dances with songs, we cry because of songs. Music—when breathed into with intention, intellect, and purpose—can restore and unify. If you need an example, listen to Silent Planet’s newest album, Everything Was Sound.

    Silent Planet—comprised of Alex Camarena, Thomas Freckleton, Garrett Russell and Mitchell Stark—writes with purpose. The LA-based band’s first album, The Night God Slept, gave voice to characters victimized by systemic oppression. The album used historical settings and the characters within it to magnify their marginalized perspectives, resulting in a musical accomplishment outfitted with quality instrumentals, rich storytelling, and a mouthpiece for the silenced. Their second full-length project bears consistent fruit with their first.

    Everything Was Sound, the sophomore release on Solid State Records, is unrelenting in its endeavor to marry its sophisticated metalcore sound with the quiet voice of the alienated. The band’s vocalist, Garret Russell, walks us out of their first album’s story and straight into this one: a metaphorical prison housing society’s misunderstood. The panopticon (both a psychological concept and a physical space) is a many roomed, doorless prison equipped with one, concealed guard. Without the ability to see where the guard is looking, the construct effectively controls each inmates behavior. Russell uses this theory (designed by philosopher and social theorist Jeremy Bentham) to represent the societal imprisonment culture places on the mentally wounded. He walks us through nine rooms, with nine varying prisoners, and tells their stories. 

    “So many people feel completely alone. This album was inspired by the people I’ve interacted with who feel like nobody can or wants to understand them. It’s very evil to leave people isolated like that,” explains Russell. “Our goal is to make people’s stories visible, to give words and to give music to things that aren't often talked about.” Take the track “Panic Room” for example. “God gave me a vision, in a very mystical way, of my friend who suffers with PTSD. I wanted to tell his story in a way that honored him.” Lyrics like, “this is war: A child stumbles from the wreckage holding his salvation - the trigger to cessation - to end us all. I took a life that takes mine, every quiet moment we collapse,” paint a panicked and painful perspective, but one that gave healing to the friend who inspired it. From the song “Understanding Love Is Lost,” about the wreckage of suicide, to “Nervosa,” about the destruction of eating disorders, Silent Planet intentionally introduces us to the struggling souls surrounding us.

    And that isn’t all they’re intentional about. The instrumentals, the lyrics, and the artwork are unanimously designed to, in Russell’s words, “challenge intentions, stir the subconscious, and offend assumptions.” Whether it be the enneagram of personality that marks the cover art, the inkblots within the liner notes tethered to each archetype, or the cited sources laced within each song, you’ll feel what Russell says is a “dance between wholeness and oblivion.” The theme weaves itself—through color, word, sound, and design—into all aspects of the project.

    Silent Planet’s pursuit is perhaps best stated by the two instrumental tracks within the album—“Tout comprendre” and “C’est tout pardoner”—whose combined titles mean “to understand all is the forgive all.” In the final song, the prisoners escape bondage and unite, planting a new tree of life in the center of the panopticon. “People have been inhabiting inside of their wounds,” explains Russell, “and I believe they can come together to be healed. Step out, see each other, and find freedom in being seen.”

  • Thousand Below

    Thousand Below

    Post-Hardcore

The Devil Wears Prada
Veil Of Maya, Silent Planet, Thousand Below

Sat Nov 4 2017 6:15 PM

(Doors 6:00 PM)

Bottom Lounge Chicago IL
The Devil Wears Prada, Veil Of Maya, Silent Planet, Thousand Below
  • Sorry, you missed this event.
  • Check out other similar events on TicketWeb.

$23.00 All Ages