Talib Kweli, Phony PPL, Yc the Cynic, Maureen "Ma Dukes" Yancey , Jarobi, A Tribe Called Quest, Tanya Morgan, Nemo Achida & 88 Keys, Soul Khan

Sun Mar 23 2014

7:30 PM (Doors 6:30 PM)

The Marlin Room at Webster Hall

125 East 11th St. New York, NY 10003

$25.00

Ages 18+

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“NY Loves Dilla”
The 1st Annual Official NY Dilla Tribute Show

 

This event is in The Marlin Room at Webster Hall

 

WebsterHallConcerts.com Presents: “NY Loves Dilla”
Talib Kweli, Phony PPL, Yc the Cynic Hosted by Maureen "Ma Dukes" Yancey and Jarobi of A Tribe Called Quest, Tanya Morgan, Nemo Achida & 88 Keys, Soul Khan

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  • Talib Kweli

    Urban

    Ever since emerging as a member of Black Star in the late 1990s, Talib Kweli is one of the few artists making commercially viable music that matters. The Brooklyn bred rapper's hard-hitting music has been able to educate and entertain simultaneously. So it is no wonder that at the peak of their fame, both Jay-Z and 50 Cent named Talib Kweli as one of their favorite rappers.

    With Ear Drum, his first album released on his own Blacksmith Music and his sixth album overall, Kweli has delivered his career-defining work, a polished collection showcasing his advanced lyricism and his penchant for picking music that resonates long after the song ends. "The image of the ear and of the drum are powerful enough by themselves, but when you put them together, it's an instrument that's in your body that helps you hear," he explains. "They're also two very simple, yet powerful words. I wanted to focus on finding a sound that makes you move, and that's where the word 'Ear Drum' popped in my head."

    Throughout Ear Drum, Kweli delivers powerful music that sparks your intellect and makes your body move. He teams with Reflection Eternal partner Hi-Tek on "More Or Less." Over pounding drums and a minimalistic groove, Kweli makes brash declarations on how to improve music specifically and American society in general. "A statement like, we need 'more rap songs that stress purpose/With less misogyny and less curses/Let's put more depth in our verses,' I haven't made bold, blatant statements since that like 'Manifesto.' There are fans of mine that really appreciate those statements because there are times when those statements need to be made."

    An equally bold Ear Drum moment comes on "Country Cousins," which features Kweli trading verses with UGK and Raheem DeVaughn. Over a soulful beat accented by brassy horns, Kweli, Bun B and Pimp C talk about the reality of their experiences growing up in New York and Texas, respectively. "People have the perception of what an East Coast artist sounds like, who he's supposed to be listening to and what he likes, and what a Down South artist sounds like," Kweli explains. "There's preconceived notions and that's really what the song with Bun and Pimp C is about, the preconceived notions between East Coast artists and Down South artists."

    Throughout Ear Drum, Kweli makes a point to explore new topics, collaborate with a variety of artists and rap over distinctively innovative production. It is part of Kweli's growth as an artist and as a person. "We need to challenge our audience but we also need to challenge ourselves to know that whatever our new experiences are, we can write about them, be creative and bring that to an audience without them feeling alienated," he says.

    Long-time Talib Kweli followers will say the same thing about him. Since his stellar debut with Mos Def as Black Star, Kweli has been one of rap's most exceptional and consistent artists. Released in 2000, Reflection Eternal, the RIAA-certified gold album with Hi-Tek, was one of the most acclaimed albums of the year. In 2002, smash single "Get By," the biting political commentary "The Proud" and the insightful examination of America's gun culture on "Gun Music" made Quality a landmark recording and Kweli's second gold album. Subsequent recordings in 2004 (The Beautiful Struggle) and 2005 (Right About Now) solidified his status as one of rap's most talented and important voices.

    Now, after establishing himself as a rap visionary, Kweli along with long-time manager Corey Smyth launched Blacksmith Music. The pair signed an exclusive deal with Warner Bros. to market, promote, and distribute the music of Blacksmith artists. Following Kweli's release on Blacksmith/WBR there will be a new solo album from Jean Grae, the critically acclaimed South African-born female rapper who is among the most respected female rappers in the history of the genre. Rolling Stone called her "the best kept secret on New York&..39;s indie hip-hop scene," while XXL, Spin, Village Voice, URB and others have labeled her an artist to watch. Strong Arm Steady, a forthcoming Blacksmith/WBR release, is a super group whose members are platinum rapper and Pimp My Ride host Xzibit, Los Angeles underground star Phil The Agony, lyrical assassin Krondon and San Diego rap pioneer Mitchy Slick. Strong Arm Steady has been one of the few West Coast acts to build a rabid fanbase through mixtapes.

    Kweli hopes Blacksmith will create a movement with Jean Grae and Strong Arm Steady, much as his own music has. "With Blacksmith, I want it to be a flag that everyone can wave," he says. "I want to be packing shows and I want people to feel like they were up on Jean Grae and Strong Arm Steady before anybody else was."

    In the mean time, the lyrically and sonically potent Ear Drum demonstrates that strong, powerful messages can serve as the backbone for music at its best. "The vast majority of my subject matter focuses on black self-love, black self esteem, black self worth," Kweli says. "That translates to other communities because if you're a human being, it doesn't matter what color you're talking about. You've been through some sort of struggle and you can apply it to your own life."

  • Phony PPL

    Phony PPL

    Alternative Rock

    Phony Ppl either crash-landed from the past or the future: critics and fans can’t decide. Since popping up on New York City’s indie radar in 2011, the amorphous band has forged an entirely new sound built on vintage astral funk, colorful world music, and dusted-out hip-hop/R&B. Co-founded by writer/producer Elbee Thrie and keyboardist Aja Grant, the band flipped high school demo recordings into meditative self-released singles like “I Wish I Was A Chair” and “Statues,” and tours with like-minded experimental elders Theophilus London, Erykah Badu and The Roots. Natives of Bed-Stuy, Brooklyn, the band has gained a global fanbase of early adopters including BBC6’s Giles Peterson and Tokyo streetwear icon Skatething—not bad for a D.I.Y crew that produced and recorded much of their output from a Nostrand Avenue brownstone. Their latest effort, 2013’s “53,000” was acclaimed by critics, fans and peers like Chance the Rapper and The Internet, and NPR’s George Hahn called it “My favorite album right now… a rich, multi-layered and worthwhile listen.” Currently prepping their proper debut album, the band maintains their youthful, imaginative sound while eyeing more mature production.

  • Yc the Cynic

    Yc the Cynic

    Urban

    Born in the poorest congressional district in the country, Matthew Jefferson (aka YC The Cynic) has become a torchbearer for progressive hip-hop music. Known for his quick-witted lyricism, YC has been on a mission to revitalize the birthplace of hip-hop culture. As a founding member of RDACBX, a hip-hop community center in the South Bronx, YC has begun teaching the “Art of Rap,” with the hopes that the youth will be able to further change the climate in mainstream music. He has been featured on MTV, BET, The Source, and Complex Magazine; was named one of the “Top 5 Underground Hip-Hop Artists in NYC” by The Deli Magazine; and has toured the country doing what he loves. So, as YC would say it, “life is good.”

  • Maureen "Ma Dukes" Yancey

    Maureen "Ma Dukes" Yancey

    Urban

  • Jarobi

    Jarobi

    Urban

  • A Tribe Called Quest

    A Tribe Called Quest

    Urban

    A Tribe Called Quest is one of Hip Hops most legendary, beloved and revered groups of all time and for good reason. Easily recognized for their unique approach to rap music by employing jazz infused soundscapes to Afro centric rhymes, sans the jaded and often nihilistic aggressive posturing associated with hip-hop, A Tribe Called Quest was largely responsible for the popularity of a new genre that dominated the East Coast sound of the early 1990s.


    Queens, New York natives Q-Tip , Phife Dawg , and Ali Shaheed Muhammad of Brooklyn, formed ATCQ in 1985. Jarobi, the honorary member of ATCQ, though not always heard, was a fixture of the group in heart and in friendship. QUEST, the original name of the group, was later given the prefix A Tribe Called by their high school buddies, The Jungle Brothers, while recording Black Is Black for their album Straight Out The Jungle. ATCQ, along with the Jungle Brothers and De La Soul, formed a unit called The Native Tongues. With a building buzz around The Native Tongues and Tribes energetic live performances, ATCQ landed a major recording contract with Jive Records in 1989.


    Sonically, ATCQ was a decisive and welcomed tangent of jazz, bass-heavy rhythmic vibes and eclectic sampling when compared to the mundane recycling of soul loops, breaks and vocals of their contemporaries. Lyrically, emcees Q-Tip and Phife Dawg addressed social issues relevant to young blacks such as use of the n word and its relevance, date rape and other interpersonal relationships, industry politics and consumerism with infectious energy and fun and having a good time while still promoting positivity.


    ATCQ composed a number of successful singles and albums with their creative approach to rap music. In 1990, the group released Peoples Instinctive Travels and the Paths of Rhythm, scoring several memorable songs including Bonita Applebum, Can I Kick It and I Left my Wallet in El Segundo. It was their sophomore effort, The Low End Theory, considered one of the greatest follow-ups in hip-hop history, that would solidify them as legends. Released in late 1991, the freedom expressed in the creation and feel of this record - along with its successor Midnight Marauders - influenced many future artists and producers such as Common, The Roots, Jill Scott, Kanye West and The Neptunes. These artists are a part of ATCQs legacy and are evidence of ATCQs impact for years to come. Classics like Award Tour, Electric Relaxation, Check The Rhyme and Scenario defined ATCQs sound during this period.


    In 1996, ATCQs fourth album, Beats, Rhymes & Life, was released. The Ummah - a production team consisting of Q-Tip , Ali Shaheed and newcomer and stellar talent Jay Dee (now Jay Dilla of Slum Village) - was established the same year. The team worked together to share their aural aesthetic with other artists like Janet Jackson, DAngelo, and Faith Evans.


    ATCQ continued to perfect and advance their sound, displaying their unique take on hip-hop. It was with the completion of their fifth studio album, The Love Movement, that ATCQ chose to exit the proverbial stage.


    In recent years, the anticipation for another ATCQ album has been building. The Abstract Poetic, Five Foot Assasin , and Mr. Muhammad have yet to grace the studio for another record, but have hit the road again. Today, the power of their music is still evident in their dynamic stage shows and in the reception of their adoring fans.


    A Tribe Called Quests anomalous posture has changed the face and sound of hip-hop and paved the way for future groups, artists, producers and even fans to be unapologetic about their creative expression. With or without future recordings, ATCQs legacy lives on in the groups creative innovation that is recognized as a profound contribution to musical history. 


    A Tribe Called Quest is one of Hip Hops most legendary, beloved and revered groups of all time and for good reason. Easily recognized for their unique approach to rap music by employing jazz infused soundscapes to Afro centric rhymes, sans the jaded and often nihilistic aggressive posturing associated with hip-hop, A Tribe Called Quest was largely responsible for the popularity of a new genre that dominated the East Coast sound of the early 1990s.


    Queens, New York natives Q-Tip , Phife Dawg , and Ali Shaheed Muhammad of Brooklyn, formed ATCQ in 1985. Jarobi, the honorary member of ATCQ, though not always heard, was a fixture of the group in heart and in friendship. QUEST, the original name of the group, was later given the prefix A Tribe Called by their high school buddies, The Jungle Brothers, while recording Black Is Black for their album Straight Out The Jungle. ATCQ, along with the Jungle Brothers and De La Soul, formed a unit called The Native Tongues. With a building buzz around The Native Tongues and Tribes energetic live performances, ATCQ landed a major recording contract with Jive Records in 1989.


    Sonically, ATCQ was a decisive and welcomed tangent of jazz, bass-heavy rhythmic vibes and eclectic sampling when compared to the mundane recycling of soul loops, breaks and vocals of their contemporaries. Lyrically, emcees Q-Tip and Phife Dawg addressed social issues relevant to young blacks such as use of the n word and its relevance, date rape and other interpersonal relationships, industry politics and consumerism with infectious energy and fun and having a good time while still promoting positivity.


    ATCQ composed a number of successful singles and albums with their creative approach to rap music. In 1990, the group released Peoples Instinctive Travels and the Paths of Rhythm, scoring several memorable songs including Bonita Applebum, Can I Kick It and I Left my Wallet in El Segundo. It was their sophomore effort, The Low End Theory, considered one of the greatest follow-ups in hip-hop history, that would solidify them as legends. Released in late 1991, the freedom expressed in the creation and feel of this record - along with its successor Midnight Marauders - influenced many future artists and producers such as Common, The Roots, Jill Scott, Kanye West and The Neptunes. These artists are a part of ATCQs legacy and are evidence of ATCQs impact for years to come. Classics like Award Tour, Electric Relaxation, Check The Rhyme and Scenario defined ATCQs sound during this period.


    In 1996, ATCQs fourth album, Beats, Rhymes & Life, was released. The Ummah - a production team consisting of Q-Tip , Ali Shaheed and newcomer and stellar talent Jay Dee (now Jay Dilla of Slum Village) - was established the same year. The team worked together to share their aural aesthetic with other artists like Janet Jackson, DAngelo, and Faith Evans.


    ATCQ continued to perfect and advance their sound, displaying their unique take on hip-hop. It was with the completion of their fifth studio album, The Love Movement, that ATCQ chose to exit the proverbial stage.


    In recent years, the anticipation for another ATCQ album has been building. The Abstract Poetic, Five Foot Assasin , and Mr. Muhammad have yet to grace the studio for another record, but have hit the road again. Today, the power of their music is still evident in their dynamic stage shows and in the reception of their adoring fans.


    A Tribe Called Quests anomalous posture has changed the face and sound of hip-hop and paved the way for future groups, artists, producers and even fans to be unapologetic about their creative expression. With or without future recordings, ATCQs legacy lives on in the groups creative innovation that is recognized as a profound contribution to musical history. 

  • Tanya Morgan

    Tanya Morgan

    Urban

    Tanya Morgan is a rap group. More than that, they’re a great rap group as evidenced by the acclaim they’ve received from the likes of Billboard, Vibe, SPIN, XXL Magazine, XLR8R, Los Angeles Times, The Onion, NY Magazine and a bevy of other press outlets who have praised the group throughout the duration of their career. "Tanya Morgan are like the sons of De La Soul -- soulful, stressed, effortlessly smart flows, intricate production, the whole package," says SPIN Music Editor Charles Aaron.

    Hailing from both Brooklyn and Cincinnati, Tanya Morgan formed on the message boards of Okayplayer.com in 2003 when Donwill, Ilyas Nashid and Von Pea were all solo artists trading demos and beat tapes. The three MCs decided to collaborate for a one-off project and settled on the name Tanya Morgan - an inside joke to trick hip-hop crate-diggers and sample-searchers into thinking the record was an old-school soul singer. After their debut album, Moonlighting, was endorsed by the likes of ?uestlove in 2006 and was received enthusiastically by fans, Tanya Morgan decided to keep working together and keep the name. In the wake of Moonlighting’s critical success, the group released its follow-up, 2009’s Brooklynati which saw the group reach more fans and beguile more journalists as it was widely regarded as one of the year’s best hip hop releases.

    Since Brooklynati, the group has reformed with Ilyas moving on to focus on his solo material and video production while Von Pea and Donwill continue to tour as Tanya Morgan, supporting the group’s classic material as well as their solo releases.

  • Nemo Achida & 88 Keys

    Nemo Achida & 88 Keys

    Urban

    Static. Stagnant. Suffocatingly repetitive is the breeze that flows throughout the music world. Here to free us from that commercialized smog is Nemo Achida.

    Eccentric, eclectic, emerging artist. Poised and determined, bringing artistry and honesty back to our carbon copy culture. Nemo's words resonate and reflect everyday people, and expose what it is to embody the new side of urban lifestyle. Looking to set himself apart from industry standards, Nemo Achida has built unique concepts and placed hidden messages that are designed to inspire and/or inform his followers.

    Born in Lexington KY, and raised around family in such urban settings as New York City and Atlanta, these life experiences shine through in his work allowing Nemo to be a well rounded artist without a region related label. Since Nemo Achida was nine, he's been behind the mic; Whether it was weekly gigs, playing drums for his church, or jamming in front of small crowds. That tenacity grew into the oppurtunity of being an standout performer, blasting through everyone's radar. Adding in his love for unique genres of music, including but not limited to Electro, Gospel, and Jazz, Nemo is truly a musician of the future.

    Some of Nemo Achida's accolades include, four projects between Fall 2009 and Winter 2011, three were EP's (Elevator music, Vibrations, The North Star), and the other was a mixtape presented by KevinNottingham.com (Climax Shxt). As far as results go, the Nemo Achida brand receives anywhere from 3,000 to 8,000 downloads & views at every release. Nemo Achida has been featured on familiar blogs such as: Mad Decent :), RCRD LBL, ILLROOTS, KevinNottingham.com, YearoftheBlacksmith.com (Talib Kweli), ThatsEnuff.com (DJ Enuff), RubyHornet.com, QN5.com (Cunninlynguists), and many others. Twitter account has 1300+ followers & Facebook account has 4000+ believers. Talib Kweli picked Nemo's summer 2010 single "Memories" to be on his BlackSmith Community Mixtape, which was a collaboration tape with Mick Boogie and Pete Rock. 

    "I enjoy my shows when I feel the audience is at one with the rhythm, the melody, and the lyrics". Nemo is known to leave it all on the stage and never the audience feeling cheated, but leaves them anticipating his next performance. Inspiration comes from everything. The most complexe literature and even GQ [magazine], laughs the artist that gathers influence from such genius as Prince, Kanye West, Andre 3000, Q-Tip, N.E.R.D, and the entire Soulquariun Movement. Adhering to the quote: "By any means necessary," and accepting that failure is not an option, Nemo plans to seize us by our musical heartstrings, and deliver us to Bliss.

  • Soul Khan

    Soul Khan

    Urban

    With hip-hop being a culture predicated on keeping it “real,” few artists have a reality as compelling and unique as Soul Khan’s. Born in Los Angeles, but currently residing in Brooklyn, Khan’s meteoric rise over the past four years has transcended being a viral sensation into one of the most buzzed about indie-rap superstars today. In an industry obsessed with catering to every short-lived trend, Khan has stayed true to himself and amassed an impressively loyal following in the process. - See more at: http://soulkhan.com/bio/#sthash.t6p6YPeK.dpuf

WebsterHallConcerts.com Presents: “NY Loves Dilla”

Talib Kweli, Phony PPL, Yc the Cynic Hosted by Maureen "Ma Dukes" Yancey and Jarobi of A Tribe Called Quest, Tanya Morgan, Nemo Achida & 88 Keys, Soul Khan

Sun Mar 23 2014 7:30 PM

(Doors 6:30 PM)

The Marlin Room at Webster Hall New York NY
Talib Kweli, Phony PPL, Yc the Cynic, Maureen "Ma Dukes" Yancey , Jarobi, A Tribe Called Quest, Tanya Morgan, Nemo Achida & 88 Keys, Soul Khan
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  • Check out other similar events on TicketWeb.

$25.00 Ages 18+

“NY Loves Dilla”
The 1st Annual Official NY Dilla Tribute Show

 

This event is in The Marlin Room at Webster Hall