State Champs

Tue Oct 5 2021

6:30 PM (Doors 6:00 PM)

SOMA - Mainstage

3350 Sports Arena Blvd San Diego, CA 92110

$29.50

All Ages

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Pure Noise Records Tour

State Champs
Real Friends
Four Year Strong
Just Friends
Bearings 

Citi Presale 6/22 at 10am to 6/24 at 10pm PDT
Live Nation Presale 6/23 at 10am to 6/24 at 10pm PDT
SOMA San Diego Presale 6/24 at 10am to 10pm PDT
Public Onsale 6/25 at 10am PDT
 

Live Nation Presents...
State Champs

  • State Champs

    State Champs

    Pop Punk

    Albany, New York-based pop-punk band State Champs began in 2010, basing their quick-paced and emotive sound on the influence of masters of the genre like Fall Out Boy, the Story So Far, and New Found Glory. Based around singer Derek Discanio's wailing vocals, the band was filled out by guitarists Tyler Szalkowski and Tony Diaz and bassist William Goodermote; they were eventually joined by drummer Evan Ambrosio. After a demo circulated, the band released the Overslept EP in late 2012, and followed with full-length The Finer Things in 2013. An acoustic revamp of The Finer Things -- The Acoustic Things EP -- was released in late 2014. A year later, the band released their second LP, Around the World and Back, on Pure Noise Records. The album would prove to be somewhat of a breakout for State Champs, reaching number 30 on Billboard's Top 200 and laying the foundation for two years of hard touring. They issued a deluxe version of the same album with a DVD and a number of bonus songs in early 2017.

  • Real Friends

    Real Friends

    Alternative Rock

    For as much as the world has changed since Real Friends first emerged in 2010, the band’s mission hasn’t. The Illinois quintet continue to bleed without apology and write songs that make it okay to feel everything: the ups, the downs, and anything else in between. Rather than shy away from emotion, the group run right towards it with distortion cranked and hearts opened, tightening their careful distillation of pop and punk on each subsequent release.  When the band—Dave Knox [lead guitar], Kyle Fasel [bass], Eric Haines [rhythm guitar], and Brian Blake [drums]—welcomed vocalist Cody Muraro in 2020, the goal stayed the same as they crafted new music for Pure Noise Records.
    “It’s really still the same mission,” affirms Kyle. “We write songs you can connect to. We want those songs to be a part of your life as much as they’re a part of our lives. This band is everything to me. We’re all so invested in every aspect of this that we couldn’t stop. I’m more grateful than ever for Real Friends.”
    A diehard audience might be even more grateful. Real Friends have forged and strengthened a deep connection with fans over the years. The group’s 2014 full-length debut, Maybe This Place Is the Same and We’re Just Changing, marked a turning point. Rock Sound named it one of the “Top 50 Albums of the Year. 2016’s The Home Inside My Head maintained this momentum with further acclaim and sold-out shows. In 2018, Composure incited applause from Music Connection, Alternative Press, Substream Magazine, New Noise, and Billboard who described it as “raw.To date, they’ve also amassed over 100 million streams and counting.
    During 2020, the band amicably parted ways with their original vocalist. They continued to look ahead, auditioning singers until Cody came into the picture.
    “We all felt the conviction in his voice,” Kyle goes on. “That was what distinguished him the most. Emotion is a signature element of Real Friends. That came through right away, but he also brought some grit of his own.”
    “We share influences and come from a very similar place where music is a massive part of our lives,” adds Cody. “It was such a good fit, because of that. Everything clicked. When they called me, they were all on the line, so I thought, ‘Something’s going to happen’. They asked me to be the singer of the band. I took the job. A month later, I was down in L.A. recording music with them.”
    Signing to Pure Noise Records, they co-wrote with Andrew Wade [A Day To Remember] and recorded with longtime producer Mike Green. Now, they ignite this next chapter with “Nervous Wreck.” On the track, anxious guitars toss and turn underneath confessional verses before crashing into a catchy chorus.
    “It was inspired by feeling like you’re stuck in a way,” Kyle reveals. “When you’re around other people, you don’t really feel like yourself. When you’re by yourself, you feel isolated and like a nervous wreck all the time.”
    On its heels, “Storyteller” threads a clean guitar melody around tense vocals, culminating on a scream, “You’re a liar.
    “It’s inspired by a couple of different situations where someone tells you one thing, but you find out it’s not the truth,” he goes on. “They’re telling these stories over and over again.”
    In the end, you can rely on Real Friends.
    “When you listen to this, I hope it still sounds like Real Friends,” Kyle leaves off. “We’re moving in the same direction, and we have a common vision. The spirit is still there.”
    BOILER
    For as much as the world has changed since Real Friends first emerged in 2010, the band’s mission hasn’t. The Illinois quintet continue to bleed without apology and write songs that make it okay to feel everything: the ups, the downs, and anything else in between. Rather than shy away from emotion, the group run right towards it with distortion cranked and hearts opened, tightening their careful distillation of pop and punk on each subsequent release.  When the band—Dave Knox [lead guitar], Kyle Fasel [bass], Eric Haines [rhythm guitar], and Brian Blake [drums]—welcomed vocalist Cody Muraro in 2020, the goal stayed the same as they crafted new music for Pure Noise Records.
    Over the years, Real Friends have forged and strengthened a deep connection with fans. The group’s 2014 full-length debut, Maybe This Place Is the Same and We’re Just Changing, marked a turning point. Rock Sound named it one of the “Top 50 Albums of the Year. 2016’s The Home Inside My Head maintained this momentum with further acclaim and sold out shows. In 2018, Composure incited applause from Music Connection, Alternative Press, Substream Magazine, New Noise, and Billboard who described it as “raw.To date, they’ve also amassed over 100 million streams and counting. In 2021, they turned the page on a new chapter with the singles “Nervous Wreck” and “Storyteller.”
     
     
  • Four Year Strong

    Four Year Strong

    Punk

    If it’s hard for you to believe that Four Year Strong have been a band for nearly two decades, you’re not alone because its members feel the same way. Since forming in 2001 in Worcester, Massachusettes, while the members were still in high school, Four Year Strong have carved out their own niche in the music community by merging the infectiousness of pop-punk with the aggression of hardcore and never shying away from breaking with creativity-limiting conventions. This is evident on the band’s fifth full-length Brain Pain, a collection of songs that retains the qualities of the band that fans have grown to love while pushing forward the band’s effort to continually redefine their sound. “One thing we’ve struggled with in the past is writing in a way that’s personal to us that our wide range of fans can find a way to relate to as well,” vocalist/guitarist Dan O’Connor explains. “On this record we really tried to find the thing that connects us to our younger fans or the people who have been listening to us for a long time who still see us as younger kids despite the fact that we’re now in our thirties.”
     
    The band -- which also features vocalist/guitarist Alan Day, bassist Joe Weiss and drummer Jake Massucco -- began conceptualizing the ideas for Brain Pain two years ago and for the past year-and-a-half have focused on bringing those thoughts to fruition. “We probably had 40 song ideas to get the creative juices flowing and some of those grew into the songs that are on this record,” Day explains, adding that it was important for the group not to rush the album or go into it with any musical or logistical limitations. “We didn’t want to set a strict deadline for this album because we wanted to be sure we took the time to write the best songs possible. In the past our writing and recording was so dependent on getting something out in time to go on tour; this time we really had the opportunity to take our time and work through these ideas.” In order to capture that sound the group enlisted producer Will Putney, who was an engineer on 2008’s Enemy Of The World and already had a relationship with the band. “We were really emotionally invested in this music so we wanted to go with someone who we knew would care about it as much as we did and Will was that guy,” Day says.
     
    From the off-time breakdown of the opener “It’s Cool” to the orchestral balladry of “Be Good When I’m Gone” to the midtempo groove of “Get Out Of My Head,” Brain Pain sees Four Year Strong showcasing the various aspects of their sound, which ranges from catchy to chaotic, yet all sound undeniably like Four Year Strong. “I think ‘Get Out Of My Head’ holds a special place in our hearts because it was the first song that we finished front-to-back with all the pieces in there,” Day explains. “Almost none of it changed from when we first wrote it to the finished version of it and it felt like a turning point in the writing process.” Alternately “Seventeen” evokes the best parts of nostalgia without sounding dated while the syncopated riffing on “Usefully Useless” crafts a sonic maelstrom that’s as inventive as it is infectious. Finally old-school fans will love songs like “Mouth Full Of Dirt” which showcases the melodic hardcore style the band helped pioneer and sounds absolutely massive thanks to Putney’s production.
     
    Vocally Brain Pain sees the band being more direct and carrying over cohesive themes in a way they haven’t done in the past, making for a more complete narrative. “I think that from a lyrical perspective this is the most thought we’ve ever put into a record,” O’ Connor explains -- and it shows. Sonically the album’s vocals also sit in the mix in a way that they aren’t battling with the other elements, making Brain Pain the band’s most dynamic release to date. “There are a lot more bands doing the heavy-but-poppy hybrid thing now than there were when we started out and we just really wanted this record to stand out and be its own version of that,” Massucco explains. “Our goal was to make a record that felt authentic to who we are, not pander to some version of us that we thought people wanted to hear,” Day affirms. “I think we did that this time around.”
     
    “We always try to evolve the sound of our band,” O’Connor adds. “I think that's one of the things that has separated us from some of the bands who are around for a long time because you can get kind of sendenary and happy with where you are. We always say, ‘if Four Year Strong is a box we're always trying to push the edges of that box out a little bit of what the band can be’ and I think that's keeps it exciting for us,” he summarizes when asked about how the band have managed to stay relevant for so long. “A lot of the things we did when we were younger kids were throwing things against the wall and seeing what sticks. Now we're trying to come to a place with everything we're doing where it's a little more thought out… which is what old guys would do,” he adds with a laugh, “but we’re really happy with how it turned out.”
     
  • Just Friends

    Just Friends

    Pop Punk

    At the core of Just Friends, a funk-punk collective from California’s Bay Area, is the idea of community. To understand this, you need only to pull up any video of them playing live—like this rendition of “Never Gonna Bring You Down,” from their latest album, 2018’s Nothing But Love. Over bright horns and guitars, lead vocalists Sam Kless and Brianda Goyos León trade lines—sometimes singing, sometimes shouting—adding to each other’s energy with every syllable while their band-mates groove along. The result? A bombastic musical celebration that incorporates elements of punk, hip-hop, funk, brass, and emo; an epic group hang-turned-dance party.
     
    Fittingly, the band’s infectious energy is a reflection of their real-life relationships: “We’re like one big family,” explains Kless, 26. “We have our own lingo; we have our own thing. When you see us play, you’re just seeing what it’s like to hang out. We can just be 100 percent ourselves around each other, always.”
     
    It makes sense that the group’s chemistry is so seamless—they had music in common from the start, with the majority of the members meeting in band class as teenagers: “We were the supergroup of the band kids,” Kless says with a laugh. “We have so many influences—musically, culturally, and experience-wise. We’re like a melting pot.” Alongside Kless and Goyos León, Just Friends includes Avi Dey (trumpet), Chris Palowitch (trombone, keys), Brandon Downum (guitar), Matt Yankovich (guitar), Kevin Prochnow (bass), Ben Donlon (drums), Eric Butler (trombone, vocals), Ryan Ellery (audio engineering, live sound, guitar), and sometimes Bart Thompson (bass) and Kent Soliday (guitar). The band’s community even extends beyond its playing members: the majority of Just Friends’ merch and artwork is designed by their manager and long-time friend, Joel Kirschenbaum. Kirschenbaum also did the animation work in the colorful music video for “Supersonic,” the band’s latest visual.)
     
    Although many of Just Friends’ members, including Kless, were in other local groups over the years, they began writing under their current moniker in 2013, originally reconvening during the summers when they’d come home from their respective colleges. In 2015, they released their debut collection, Rock 2 the Rhythm, followed by their sophomore effort, Nothing But Love, in 2018. Following the release, after of a slew of smash hit live performances supporting fellow Bay Area rockers Mom Jeans, the group signed to Pure Noise Records in early 2019.

    This signing marks the start of an immensely promising new chapter. Along with new music on the horizon, Just Friends is slated to hop on tour for the 2019 Sad Summer Festival alongside the likes of The Wonder Years, The Maine, Mayday Parade, and more. At this exciting time, Kless feels most grateful to be able to spread positivity through music on a larger scale. “I know what it’s like to not have anyone,” Kless explains, recalling his middle school years when he was bullied by classmates. “I want to use this band—and use our platform—to do everything we can [to promote inclusivity]. It’s like a movement. Anybody can join our squad or family. Anyone can be one of us.”
     
     
  • Bearings

    Bearings

    Pop Punk

    “I hate having things make total sense all the time,” muses BEARINGS frontman Doug Cousins. “It drives me a little crazy.”
     
    While the world outside is certainly anything but sensical these days, Cousins and his bandmates have worked to mine their mixed emotions on their sophomore full-length, HELLO, IT’S YOU, released Nov. 20, 2020 via Pure Noise.
     
    The album follows 2018’s Blue In The Dark (hailed by Alternative Press as one of the year’s best) and finds Bearings both deepening and widening their sonic palette: There’s a sharpened take on the classic pop-punk vibe the Ontario, Canada-based quintet – Cousins, guitarists Ryan Culligan and Ryan Fitz, bassist Collin Hanes, and drummer Mike McKerracher – have traded in since forming in 2014, the same mix of ebullient energy and undeniable melodies that have earned them respect and tour invitations from both new-school heavyweights like State Champs and legends like Less Than Jake.
     
    Songs such as lead single “Sway,” which first took shape as an acoustic-rich beach-pop song before morphing during a session with Four Year Strong’s Alan Day, and the album-opening “Better Yesterday” showcase the band’s predilection for sun-kissed SoCal melodies and propulsive rhythms. Elsewhere, the muscular ’80s pop-rock pastiches “Super Deluxe,” “Over Now,” and “I Feel It All” toe the line between retro yet simultaneously current and cool.
     
    For every pop-heavy push on the Courtney Ballard (Good Charlotte, Waterparks)-produced album, there’s the pull of something more. For Cousins, this was by design. “It’s very rare for me to think of things as one emotion or feeling,” he explains. “Life is always a mixture that shifts and changes. I wanted the songs to switch places, emotions, feelings.”
     
    This desire comes into focus when you hit the acoustic-based “Lovely Lovely,” a sepia-toned standout the band didn’t originally even think had a place on the album. From the song’s dissonant opening chords through a Gallagher-ian crescendo that explodes into a soaring chorus, there’s a wistful sense of melancholia that acts as a perfect counter to Hello, It’s You’s more carefree moments. Stand that up next to a song like “Dreams,” which cribs a page from the bubbling emo-rap movement, and it’s clear Bearings have plenty of emotional baggage to accompany their buoyancy.
     
    Compared to Blue In The Dark, which Cousins sees as largely abstract and ruminative, Hello, It’s You explores more inter- (and intra-) personal relationships. He points to the hard-charged, album-closing “Transient Colors,” the perfect encapsulation of the dueling emotions he finds himself facing on much of the album.
     
    “At the end of a relationship, after two people decide it’s not going to work, you’re never going to not care about them,” he explains of the song and, in many ways, the album as a whole. “You’re never going to hate them, even if you’d like to. A big part of the record is battling the happiness of being in a better place by not being together with the feeling of regret and sadness.”
     
    As a whole, Hello, It’s You uses its lyrical poignancy to elevate universal emotions all too jumbled in the current climate. It’s hard enough to be human, but add in the creeping existential dead de jour, and it’s downright confounding at times. But by reassuring fans to embrace the conflict and messiness of life, Hello, It’s You serves as a reminder of our own humanity, reaching deep into those emotions and stirring something important and long-lasting.
     
    Or, as Cousins perfectly puts it with a laugh: “It’s almost like breaking the fourth wall.” XX
     
     
     
     
     
     
     

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NO REFUNDS OR EXCHANGES - Refunds will only be issued if and when an event Cancels. Postponed events are not eligible for refunds.
Live Nation Presents...

State Champs

Tue Oct 5 2021 6:30 PM

(Doors 6:00 PM)

SOMA - Mainstage San Diego CA
State Champs

$29.50 All Ages

Pure Noise Records Tour

State Champs
Real Friends
Four Year Strong
Just Friends
Bearings 

Citi Presale 6/22 at 10am to 6/24 at 10pm PDT
Live Nation Presale 6/23 at 10am to 6/24 at 10pm PDT
SOMA San Diego Presale 6/24 at 10am to 10pm PDT
Public Onsale 6/25 at 10am PDT
 

Please correct the information below.

Select ticket quantity.

Complete the security check.

Select Tickets

All Ages
limit 4 per person
General Admission
General Admission
$29.50
Citi® Cardmember Preferred
$29.50

Delivery Method

ticketFast

Terms & Conditions

NO REFUNDS OR EXCHANGES - Refunds will only be issued if and when an event Cancels. Postponed events are not eligible for refunds.