Serious as Cancer, Masta Ace, Stricklin, Marco Polo, Rahzel, DJ JS-1, Large Professor, OC, Sadat X, More

Mon Aug 27 2012

8:00 PM (Doors 6:00 PM)

Highline Ballroom

431 W. 16th Street New York, NY 10011

$20.00

All Ages

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A Children's Cancer Research Benefit
Serious as Cancer
Masta Ace, Stricklin, Marco Polo, Rahzel, DJ JS-1, Large Professor, OC, Sadat X, More

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  • Serious as Cancer

    Serious as Cancer

    Urban

    Highline Ballroom is proud to present Serious as Cancer – A Children's Cancer Research Fundraiser benefiting St. Jude's Children's Research Hospital. Tonight's incredible lineup features performances by Masta Ace with Stricklin and Marco Polo, Rahzel and DJ JS-1, Large Professor, OC, Sadat X, Torae, PackFM, and Rasheed Chappell, plus special guest performances. Manning the DJ tables for the evening will be DJ Riz and DJ A.Vee. To top things off, the event will be hosted by D-Stroy.

    100% of the proceeds from tonight's event will go to children's cancer research, so join us at Highline Ballroom and join the fight against cancer!

  • Masta Ace

    Masta Ace

    Urban

    With an impressive resume in rap that includes membership in the legendary Juice Crew (along with Marley Marl, MC Shan, Big Daddy Kane, Biz Markie, Roxanne Shante, and Craig G) and a verse on the 1988 classic posse cut "The Symphony," Brooklyn's Masta Ace is truly an underappreciated rap veteran and underground luminary. Two years after "The Symphony," Ace released his debut album Take a Look Around on rap's version of the Motown label, Cold Chillin' Records. While not a huge commercial success the album spawned a hit single and video for "Me and the Biz" which popped up on many popular rap video shows in the late '90s for nostalgia's sake. The album has Marley Marl's keen production aura all over it and also features a guest appearance from the Biz himself. After three years on the hush, Ace returned to the fold in 1993 this time with his crew as Masta Ace Incorporated (Lord Digga and Paula Perry) and dropped Slaughtahouse. The album broke new ground by taking the synthesized West Coast Sound and filtering it through an East Coast mentality. The memorable "Born to Roll," with its tweaked Moog/Kraftwerk bass line, brought Ace some serious commercial attention. In 2000, De La Soul used this classic beat on a remix of "All Good" featuring Chaka Khan. The album also produced a few hits for undergrounders including "Jeep Ass Niguhz" and "Style Wars." The album is highly notable for its cross-coast compatibility. In 1995 Masta Ace Incorporated dropped Sittin' on Chrome, a continuation of the themes on Slaughtahouse and owning an even slicker sound. Using the Isley Brothers' much-sampled "For the Love of You" for the track "I.N.C. Ride" may have offended some of Ace's loyal fans but the song's catchy vibe made it a hit. Sittin' on Chrome is another album chock-full of Jeep beats that doesn't relinquish its standing with underground tastes. "B Side" and "4 the Mind" featuring the Cella Dwellas are also crucial jams. Ace has been known to release sleeper singles that cannot be found on his albums; one of the rarest, 1996's "Ya Hardcore," is a bumping indictment of studio gangsters and thug rap neophytes. The talented survivor in the rap game released a variety of singles in 2000 including "Hellbound," a duet with Eminem marking his 12-plus years of experience in the rap biz. The Disposable Arts album from 2001 was a well-received protest against watered-down rap with some hints that the rapper was retiring. It was all a red herring as he returned in 2004 with the conceptual album A Long Hot Summer. A year later he formed the eMC with rappers Wordsworth, Punchline, and Stricklin. ~ Michael Di Bella, Rovi

  • Rahzel

    Rahzel

    Urban

    Probably best known in the semi-mainstream world as a member of the Roots, Rahzel is an MC that specializes in the "fifth element" of hip-hop culture -- beatboxing (which comes after graffiti spraying, DJing, MCing, and breakdancing). He actively discourages classification of his sound, attempting to remain on the eclectic edge of the commercial music. According to the artist, his influences include Biz Markie, Doug E Fresh, Buffy of the Fat Boys, Bobby McFerrin, and Al Jarreau. His goal is to gain respect for beatboxing as a true art form on its own merits. Growing up, Rahzel looked up to his cousin Rahim of the Furious Five, and went to Grandmaster Flash's shows regularly. He later became a roadie for the Ultramagnetic MCs. Rahzel has in fact mastered the art of beatboxing, able to recreate full songs, with accompaniment by himself without instrumentation, able to sing a chorus and provide a backing beat simultaneously, able to invoke impressions of singers and rappers on a whim. Any fan of hip-hop should definitely invest in his Make the Music 2000 album. ~ Adam Greenberg, Rovi

  • Large Professor

    Large Professor

    Urban

    Large Professor is so involved with the history of hip-hop, it's almost impossible to separate the two. His first beat work was for Eric B. and Rakim. As a founder of the golden age crew Main Source, he gave Nasty Nas his debut. He rapped and produced on Tribe's Midnight Marauders (1993), and he co-crafted the sound of Illmatic. The list goes on: Kool G, Kane, Slick, Busta, Common. Whatever LP touches seems destined to become classic, and through it all, like rap itself, this Queens auteur continues to push the movement forward whether lacing others or blazing his own path.

    Lyrically speaking, LP is timeless. "When I started out, it was just about talking slick on the mic in the vein of the old DJs," he reminisces. "Now when I write, it's in defense of real hip-hop. Of the street and the slang. Once I get busy, it all comes pouring out." The rhymes certainly do come pouring out on Large Proefssor's latest solo release Professor @ Large, which dropped this past June. The album takes the Prof's beloved boom-bap and reinvents it for a new school of students and practitioners alike.  "The tree's still growing, still branching out," says LP. "But it's been so long since we've heard these sounds. This is what we love and there's a lack of it right now."

    The full length of Professor @ Large finds LP rhyming with a clarity and cadence that never goes out of style. Tracks like "Kick Da Habit" get to the heart of what Large Pro is all about. This particular track pays tribute to its author's addiction – making beats – while contrasting the coulda-been life of a kid who struggles with a different kind of dependence. That's rap at its essence right there. You might hear a subtle warmth to these songs inspired by a recent trip to Los Angeles. You might notice the cameo from LP's daughter Jillian, or get lost chasing a far-out instrumental, or geek over the opening line of "LP Surprise," but Professor @ Large is ultimately hip-hop as the big picture. For Large Professor, it's a way of life.

A Children's Cancer Research Benefit

Serious as Cancer
Masta Ace, Stricklin, Marco Polo, Rahzel, DJ JS-1, Large Professor, OC, Sadat X, More

Mon Aug 27 2012 8:00 PM

(Doors 6:00 PM)

Highline Ballroom New York NY
Serious as Cancer, Masta Ace, Stricklin, Marco Polo, Rahzel, DJ JS-1, Large Professor, OC, Sadat X, More
  • Sorry, you missed this event.
  • Check out other similar events on TicketWeb.

$20.00 All Ages