Rachael Ray's FEEDBACK feat. Grace Potter

Sat Jun 25 2016

6:00 PM (Doors 6:00 PM)

Lincoln Park Zoo Chicago

2001 N. Clark Ave Chicago, IL 60614

$49.50 - $299.00

All Ages

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The Lowdown
Rachael Ray’s Feedback in Chicago is a celebration of two of her favorite things: music and food – inspired by her beloved festival during SXSW in Austin. Taking place June 25, 2016 at Chicago’s iconic Lincoln Park Zoo, Feedback will feature some of Rachael’s favorite musicians as well as food creations + beer & wine pairings curated by Rachael herself. Join us for Rachael’s signature event and experience the one-of-a-kind venue that is the Lincoln Park Zoo!

You’ve got three ticket choices for Feedback Chicago:

Tier #1 – The General: $49.50

  • Includes two “Welcome To Feedback” tasting items
  • General admission access to the event
  • Access to musical performances + the food & beverage areas

Tier #2 – The Bundle: $69.50

  • Includes two “Welcome To Feedback” tasting items
  • General admission access to the event
  • Access to musical performances + the food & beverage areas
  • Custom laminate available at check-in
  • Express entry to the event
  • 2 food + 2 beverage items

Tier #3 – The Big Ticket $299 (extremely limited quantities available!)

  • Includes two “Welcome To Feedback” tasting items
  • General admission access to the event
  • Access to musical performances + the food & beverage areas
  • Custom laminate, available at check-in
  • Express entry to the event
  • Unlimited food  & beverage
  • “Skip the Line” access to all food & beverage
  • Private rooftop viewing deck overlooking the stage with a private bar

A message from the Lincoln Park Zoo: “We ask that you refrain from smoking for the health and safety of our animals and visitors.”

For more information, visit: FEEDBACKCHICAGO.COM

Rachael Ray's FEEDBACK feat. Grace Potter

  • Sorry, you missed this event.
  • Check out other similar events on TicketWeb.
  • Rachael Ray

    Rachael Ray

    Specialty Food

  • Grace Potter

    Grace Potter

    Pop

    Grace Potter’s epic musical journey reaches a new milestone with the arrival of her solo debut, Midnight, an inspired work that is surprising, revelatory and wildly original. Midnight was recorded and mixed at Barefoot Studios in Hollywood with producer Eric Valentine, whose own diverse discography—from Queens of the Stone Age to Nickel Creek—evidences a similarly adventurous spirit and openness to possibility. If Valentine’s studio work has a distinguishing characteristic, it’s his hard-hitting sonic signature, which is on display throughout Midnight’s dozen tracks. The core studio band consisted of Potter and Valentine on most of the instruments, with Burr on drums and percussion. In addition, members of Potter’s longtime band The Nocturnals: guitarists Scott Tournet and Benny Yurco and bassist Michael Libramento contributed to the sessions, as well as former tour-mates and friends including singer-songwriter Rayland Baxter, Audra Mae, Noelle Skaggs of Fitz & the Tantrums, Wayne Coyne of The Flaming Lips, and Nick Oliveri of Queens of the Stone Age. “This album is about embracing life as it comes at you – with all its unexpected twists and turns,” says Potter. “I took a much more open approach to songwriting than I have in the past – probably because it was unavoidable. I’ve experienced a huge amount of growth and change in the past two years - both personal and professional, and it can be overwhelming for an artist to find ways to express that in a vacuum. So I tried to strip away the confines of other people’s expectations. I started tapping into some of the deep-running themes that have shaped me into the human I’ve become, and as I went deeper and deeper, I found the results to be insanely satisfying. “This music means so much to me because it was hard-won. It was a terrifying yet fulfilling process of boiling down what I really wanted to say – peeling back all the protective layers of lyrical metaphor and sonic padding that I’m so used to leaning on. Ultimately the process has fueled` me to share more, learn more, listen carefully, work harder, love harder… Our time on earth is far too short to be resistant to beautiful opportunities as they come our way, so when my inspiration took me somewhere new, I did what I always do: stripped buck-ass naked and ran straight into the fire.” Citing Miles Davis, Dylan, the Beatles, Bowie, Blondie and Beck as prime examples, Potter says she is drawn to artists who make sonic leaps from record to record—a notion she has explored throughout her career. For an artist who has built a devoted fan base through her electrifying live show, Potter seems hell-bent on breaking out of the box when it comes to studio work. She refuses to be defined by a single genre. Over the last three years, she has seamlessly transitioned from collaborating with the Flaming Lips, for a Tim Burton film, to songwriting and producing for soundtracks and theme songs for film and TV, to multi-platinum, Grammy-nominated country duets with her friend Kenny Chesney, to most recently joining The Rolling Stones on stage for an inspired rendition of “Gimme Shelter.” “The bands and artists that captivate me,” Potter explains, “are the ones who are always pushing it, always taking risks. A great musician can shine in any genre. I refuse to make the same kind of record over and over—that’s not how art works for me. The worst thing an artist can do,” she asserts, “is what is expected of them.” The seeds for what would become Midnight were planted by Potter at home, in Vermont, in the fall of 2013. “I had been messing around for a few weeks with making really wacked-out home demos - lots of sounds, beats and melodies that I had never tried before,” she recalls. “It was a dark, stormy, moody day and I could hear the thunder in the distance – these big ominous clouds were rolling in fast. There was something about that threat of inclement weather beyond my control that just made me vibrate with anticipation and adrenaline, so I channeled it into this heavy boogie song—it goes right for the throat and says ‘Own your existence on earth, because who knows what’s gonna happen next.’ That solitary moment guided everything that followed, and “Alive Tonight” was the beginning of it.” Fittingly, “Alive Tonight” is Midnight’s lead single. Valentine was intrigued by Grace’s sonic experiments in her work-tapes, so much so that they formed the blueprint for a number of the arrangements that made the final cut. “Her demos had an incredible vibe that really captured a groove or mood that would immediately grab your attention,” he notes. “So it seemed like that was the way to chase down this record as an honest representation of what Grace wanted to say and how she wanted these tracks to feel—because she had done such a good job of laying it out herself.” “Hot to the Touch,” the aggressive, hook-heavy rocker that Grace chose to open the album, was the last song written for it. “When you’re making an album, you rarely have the opportunity to look at the whole thing and ask yourself what’s missing,” she points out. “And “Hot to the Touch” was the song that tied the whole thing together—the culmination of how I felt about making this entire record. It has a sexy, fiery, James Bond kind of vibe to it, and I came up with this snippy, edgy guitar part that fit really nicely. Lyrically, it’s about the tempestuous nature of love and attraction. That type of songwriting doesn’t happen very often when you’re making an album, so it felt like the cherry on top. “The song “Delirious” was the tipping point of the album in many ways. I was in a really prolific stage of the process. The heart of the record had really taken shape in my mind. I was desperate to get everything down on paper before it left my mind and sleep felt like a distraction - but strange things happen when you haven’t slept in days. I reached a moment where finally, all my pretensions, judgments and preconceived notions vanished. I’d had so many sleepless nights trying to crack the code that my defenses were down, my nerves numb and I needed a real-deal freak-out dance party - an implosion of all the walls I had built around myself.” Looking at some of Midnight’s other key songs, the stirring “Look What We’ve Become” began with a borrowed premise yet wound up as the album’s autobiographical centerpiece. “The label was really pushing me to do co-writes, which I’ve always tried to avoid, but Eric and I quickly developed a creative trust and symmetry that allowed me to feel more open to the possibilities…a few weeks later he set me up with a guy he’d worked with for years, who does a lot of co-writing, who played me a great demo,” she remembers. “When I heard the chorus, I knew I had to sing it—I found myself really attached to the melody and the message. I love the universality of it; everyone has been made to feel that they are unworthy in some way. So I wrote the verses and the bridge about my own experience with the music industry and the band. It turned out to be an excellent example of how co-writing can expand an artist’s field of play.” Grace undertook the writing of “Your Girl” with the aim of coming up with a new take on a classic love triangle on this 70’s tinged soul gem. “In one way or another, we’ve all gone through the struggle of wanting something we can’t have…but this particular cliché has been so overdone. If I wanted it to work, I needed a plot twist that was true to personal experience. Then we basically treated it a lot like a hip-hop track and just set it over an undeniable groove with some awesome quirky hooks,” she says. “In chasing down an originality in the confines of a heavily tread genre, Eric and I landed on one of my favorite sonic and lyrical moments of the album.” With its rippling guitar riff and gospel-choir payoff, “Empty Heart” is one of the catchiest songs on the album. “I wrote “Empty Heart” in the hotel room of a casino in the mid-west somewhere; bored out of my mind after a show. I had a crappy guitar with two broken strings and as I started banging away, hooting and howling, my neighbors one room over started BUMPING Usher... That’s when it hit me: ‘How cool would it be to put a super hi-fi urban beat against this jankytwangy acoustic sound?’ I never expected that it would become the feel-good song that it did…but it just goes to show that you never know where inspiration will come from – or where it will take you. You just gotta take the ride and hang on for dear life.” The release of “Alive Tonight” was shrouded in mystery, and word of Potter’s creative leap sans the Nocturnals hit the blogosphere quite suddenly causing many devoted fans to wonder if this record signaled the end of an era. Fans and friends had lots of questions, but Potter remained silent. “Yeah. People kinda freaked out, some in really good ways, some…not so much. I knew they would and I understood why; this is a bold new sound and for a hardcore fan, it’s a big deal. Loyalty has always been really important to me and so has evolution. It’s hard sometimes to understand that they don’t need to be at odds. The band is an extension of me. They are my family and a huge part of my life. I have no intention of burning bridges or leaving it in the dust. “I’ve been a Nocturnal for a decade….but I’ve been a musician forever. I’ve got a lot of different influences and creative impulses and I can’t always use my band as my springboard. Sure, I could’ve called this a GPN record, but why would I slap a sticker on an apple and call it an orange? Just to keep a few people from freaking out? Shit no! I have a responsibility to the legacy we built. It was hard. It was scary, but it was the right time to jump off with my own momentum – to open the door a little wider so the world can see another side, see what else turns me on. I’m mixing it up, doing something different…feels fucking awesome,” Potter says with a smile and a defiant shrug. “In many ways, Midnight feels like a new beginning, but really, it’s a continuation of my story. I’ve always taken chances and sharp turns. So here I am again wandering into completely uncharted waters—just laying it all out there because ‘why the fuck not?’ I have absolutely no control over how this music will be received, and that’s OK. The risk is mine, and I'm taking it with all my heart.”

  • Lee Fields & The Expressions

    Lee Fields & The Expressions

    R&B

    There aren't too many artists making soul music today who had a release in 1969, back when R&B was first beginning to give the drummer some. Lee Fields, however, is one such artist--or maybe he's better labeled a phenomenon. Since the late sixties, the North Carolina native has amassed a prolific catalog of albums and has toured and played with such legends as Kool and the Gang, Sammy Gordon and the Hip-Huggers, O.V Wright, Darrell Banks, and Little Royal. With a career spanning 43 years, releases on twelve different record labels, and having toured the world over with his raucous-yet-tender voice, it's mind-blowing that the music he's making today with Brooklyn's own Truth & Soul Records is the best of his career.

    With a catalogue that ranges from James Brown-style funk to lo-fi blues to contemporary Southern soul to collaborations with French house DJ/producer Martin Solveig, Lee Fields has done it all. Today, with The Expressions--Truth & Soul's house band, Lee Fields continues to evolve, enmeshed into the group's sweeping, string-laden, cinematic soul sound. Their first full-length together, My World, released in June 2009 on Truth & Soul, was called "one smoking mother of an old-sound soul record" and a "throwback done right" by Pitchfork.

    While drawing comparisons to groups like The Moments, The Delfonics, The Stylistics, and--of course--James Brown, My World has been able to create a space of it's own due to the group's desire to interpret and further the formulas of good soul music rather then parrot and imitate them. Chalk that up to Truth & Soul producers and co-owners Jeff Silverman and Leon Michels, as well as the high level of musicianship of everyone involved. These are the same individuals that wrote, produced, and played on Aloe Blacc's global smash hit LP Good Things for Stones Throw Records, and have provided the back drop for records by El Michels Affair, Adele, Liam Bailey, Ghostface Killah, and Jay-Z to name a few.

    "In a curious case of musical evolution, the older Fields becomes, the closer he gets to perfecting the sound of soul that he grew up with as a young man," so said music writer, scholar, and DJ Oliver Wang about Fields in a piece for NPR in July 2009. The latest LP from Lee Fields and The Expressions, titled Faithful Man, is the next step towards this perfection. A step that may find Fields, The Expressions, and Truth & Soul as a label, finally being bestowed the contemporary soul music crown.

  • Los Colognes

    Los Colognes

    Americana

    Nashville, Tennessee’s Los Colognes will release their second full-length, Dos, on September 4th, 2015, via theory eight records. The album follows their critically acclaimed 2013 debut, Working Together, and was recorded in the summer of 2014 at Bombshelter Studios in Nashville (Alabama Shakes, Hooray For The Riff Raff, Benjamin Booker).  Dos features Billy Bennett (MGMT, The Whigs, Drive-By Truckers) as engineer/mixer, was mastered by John Baldwin, and was self-produced by the band.

    About three seconds into opening track “Baby, You Can’t Have Both,” with its playful, dancing piano and guitar lines, Los Colognes announce the intention of Dos. Influences ranging from JJ Cale, the live Dead, and Dire Straits are all worn proudly, with its six members, and particularly the core songwriting duo of drummer Aaron “Mort” Mortenson and guitarist/vocalist Jay Rutherford, making jam music for fans of songwriters, classic rock for a younger generation.

    Los Colognes dates back some 15 years, to Chicago, where Mortenson, Rutherford, and bassist Gordon Persha began playing both together (and apart) in a series of “church bands, punk bands, high school bands, and any other kind of band,” learning the language of playing music with other people from a young age.  Mortenson and Rutherford eventually departed from Chicago to Nashville, in search of an atmosphere that supported spontaneous music creation, where oppressive weather and overpopulation wouldn’t make it difficult to get musicians in the same room on a regular basis.

    “Jay and I decided to make the move to Nashville in 2010 in search of like-minded musicians,” Mortenson says. “The fact that we are big JJ Cale fans played into it. We were intrigued by his history here, and Emmylou Harris’, and John Prine’s. We figured there had to be ghosts still floating around here, their stories, and maybe players from those sessions.”

    In Nashville, the rest of the band took shape, with keys player Micah Hulscher recruited in a piano boogie bar and Persha moving down from Chicago to join the group. The band’s history of playing in rotating bands proved useful as a number of Nashville singer-songwriters needed temporary backing bands for local gigs and tours, making Los Colognes “working musicians,” having graced the stage with the likes of Caitlin Rose, Nikki Lane, Kevin Gordon, Johnny Fritz and RayLand Baxter. With Rose, the band spent half of 2014 touring with her as both backing band and support, allowing them to showcase their original material to Rose’s dedicated audience.

    2013’s debut LP, Working Together, saw success on a measured scale. “It was all this random shit that just kept happening,” Rutherford jokes. “Rob Thomas of Matchbox 20 tweeted out that "Working Together" was his song of the day, which was hilarious, and six of the songs were featured in nationwide Starbucks shops multiple times a day for a year."  The band also played ACL and Hangout Fest, and garnered radio attention from Whisperin' Bob Harris at BBC Radio London and Greg Vandy at KEXP Radio Seattle.

    With Dos, the band doesn’t shift gears away from the Cale and Prine songwriting they have idolized, but, rather, try to refine their skills, develop their sound, and further incorporate influences that include the live incarnation of The Grateful Dead. “We aren’t trying to reinvent the wheel,” Mortenson says, “we are just trying to get really good at our version of it.”

    Still, the album does sound refreshing, and part of that is the retro sound and unabashed display of music that scoffs at ideas of trends or hipness. Instead, Los Colognes make music for the barrooms, for dusty music halls, and for the road. It isn’t a coincidence that song titles pull from these concepts, with “Backseat Driver,” “Drive Me Mad,” and “One Direction” reflective of their greater sound.

    Rounded out by second keyboardist Chuck Foster, whom the group describes as an encyclopedia of Southern rock, and Wojtek Krupka on guitar, Dos finds Los Colognes coming full-circle, “skirting the line of what a jam band has been and can be.” Whether sentimental on “Hard to Remember” and “One Direction” or mischievous on “Golden Dragon Hut” and “All That You Know,” moods on Dos are not fleeting, and strike universal reference points that satisfy on both casual and close listens.

    “So many jam bands I encountered in high school were just stoner rock,” Rutherford says, “but there weren’t any songs there, and the lyrics were garbage. Give me Dylan any day. But now, taking these sort of Cale-like arrangements and opening up the songs live, not playing the same eight songs the same way every night... it is just having fun and not necessarily jamming for the sake of jamming.”

    By putting songwriting at the forefront of their band, Los Colognes have put this philosophy into practice on Dos, making their upbeat anthem “Take It” almost self-referential when they sing “it takes a time or two… you better take it, before it takes you.” 

  • SIZWE THE DJ

    SIZWE THE DJ

    Music

    Rob Sizwe has developed an addiction to making, finding and sharing the best music around. A firm believer in diversity, Sizwe has a habit of making people move without sticking to any particular genre of music. Not many DJs can find a common thread between Bloc Party, Lil' Wayne, Rage Against the Machine and Camp Lo–and make it work, but he handles that challenge with ease. One of the most unpredictable DJs around, Sizwe has a captivating and unique style, and you’ll rarely catch him without a smile on his face. Outside of DJing, Rob is a pro recording engineer and producer whose credits include Azealia Banks, James Brown, Aretha Franklin, Pitch Perfect 2, Straight Outta Compton and more. He currently holds a residency at The Room Hollywood in Los Angeles, CA.

  • Al Scorch

    Al Scorch

    Roots Rock

    “Stormy, husky, brawling, City of Big Shoulders.” – from “Chicago” by Carl Sandburg

    Al Scorch grew up in Chicago, with its storied history of corrupt power at the top and righteous fighters and big dreamers at the bottom. From the town that gave the world characters like Studs Terkel, Upton Sinclair, and the anarchists in Bughouse Square, Scorch adds his voice to the choir with the enthusiasm and charisma of a Maxwell Street preacher. He eyes the prize of that ever-elusive promised land that’s worth scrapping for, wherever or whatever it may be. With a stentorian bullhorn of a voice, he exhorts, not with a holy book in his hand, but a banjo and guitar. He’s a messenger and a conduit, a believer that a soul-stirring song will march you forward.

    Balanced on wedges of punk, old-time string band, American and European folk, and soulful balladry, Al is an entertainer, road warrior, storyteller, and one helluva musician. His second album and Bloodshot debut Circle Round the Signs is built on a sonic framework sharing an intersection with the Bad Livers’ lawless next-gen take on traditional country & bluegrass, and Black Flag’s burn-it-all-down revolt and breakneck tempos. From the train-hopping tale of “Pennsylvania Turnpike” – updating steel rails to concrete ribbons – to the shout-along, late-night lament of “Insomnia” (“I toss and I turn in my bed every night/ I’m sober but my mind’s as high as a kite”), the aural dexterity is thrilling.

    Woody Guthrie’s “Slipknot” gets a complex, Western swing cum prog-grass treatment, led by the angular fiddling of Felipe Tobar, that would make acoustic thrash godfathers Split Lip Rayfield grin demonically. And “Want One” blazes down the dirt track with a Stanley Brothers fireball energy driven by Scorch’s clawhammer banjoing, and the it’s-safe-to-laugh-now adventure of meeting an intensely inebriated fan while busking across the country.

     

    But Scorch is far more than lightning for lightning’s sake. Through 10 songs of high wire musicianship, debilitating despair, wild-eyed hope, and sharpelbowed views of social (in)justice, he deftly maintains a balance of precise touch and texture, pop catchiness and frenetic intensity. That Minutemen inspired “jam econo” vibe embracing the freedom of art and community as long as you’re working hard and bringing your friends along for the ride?… Yeah, that’s here too.

    He shows a keen ear for the Mekons’ trans-Atlantic roots and marries it to the Avett Brothers’ big stage sound on “Lost At Sea.” Likewise, there is depth in the song’s lyrics during the cliffhanging, reallife narrative of a best friend almost dying when the HMS Bounty sank in Hurricane Sandy:

    “When I heard of the wreck my heart left my chest/ tears came rolling down/ the same sun shone through the window/ I thought of a world without you around”

    DIY show shakedowns parallel a down-and-out-on-Clout-Street message (“Every bossman is on another bossman’s take/ There ain’t no free man except the one you make”) on the vaudeville-via-Eastern European klezmer door-kicker “Everybody Out.” With its bittersweet imagery and mournful harmonies, “Lonesome Low” goes beyond the blue grass and into the deep woods. While the elegiac french horn in “Poverty Draft” wouldn’t sound out of place if it was played in a WWI trench, nor would its message of the poor being the tools of war (“The fight for freedom pays more than minimum wage”).

    A punk rock banjo-wielding John Prine or Billy Bragg, Al Scorch writes for the everyperson. Through his acrobatically poetic politics, hopeful tales of love lost (“Love After Death”), or cathartic takes on urban chaos (“City Lullaby”), he pens rowdy campfire stories, calls for action, and draws the epic from the ordinary. Celebrate, right a wrong, or find your path and go for it. It’s heavy shit, but so is life.

  • The Cringe

    The Cringe

    Music

    The Cringe – fronted by singer and songwriter John Cusimano, whose members include lead guitarist James Rotondi (Air, Mr. Bungle), bassist Jonny Blaze (Crash Moderns, Alice Smith) and drummer Shawn Pelton (Sheryl Crow, SNL Band, Bruce Springsteen) – have been lauded both for their incendiary live performances and top-flight musicianship, reveling in rough-hewn textures, bold instrumental turns, and aggressive grooves. The band’s fifth and most recent studio album “Blind Spot” was produced and mixed by the legendary Don Gilmore (Linkin Park, Train). Over the last decade, the Lower Manhattan-based band has made a name for itself by opening incredibly explosive live shows for bands like Motley Crüe, Alice Cooper, California Breed, The New York Dolls, Steel Panther, Trapt, Alter Bridge, and Fuel. 

Rachael Ray's FEEDBACK feat. Grace Potter

Sat Jun 25 2016 6:00 PM

(Doors 6:00 PM)

Lincoln Park Zoo Chicago Chicago IL
Rachael Ray's FEEDBACK feat. Grace Potter
  • Sorry, you missed this event.
  • Check out other similar events on TicketWeb.

$49.50 - $299.00 All Ages

The Lowdown
Rachael Ray’s Feedback in Chicago is a celebration of two of her favorite things: music and food – inspired by her beloved festival during SXSW in Austin. Taking place June 25, 2016 at Chicago’s iconic Lincoln Park Zoo, Feedback will feature some of Rachael’s favorite musicians as well as food creations + beer & wine pairings curated by Rachael herself. Join us for Rachael’s signature event and experience the one-of-a-kind venue that is the Lincoln Park Zoo!

You’ve got three ticket choices for Feedback Chicago:

Tier #1 – The General: $49.50

  • Includes two “Welcome To Feedback” tasting items
  • General admission access to the event
  • Access to musical performances + the food & beverage areas

Tier #2 – The Bundle: $69.50

  • Includes two “Welcome To Feedback” tasting items
  • General admission access to the event
  • Access to musical performances + the food & beverage areas
  • Custom laminate available at check-in
  • Express entry to the event
  • 2 food + 2 beverage items

Tier #3 – The Big Ticket $299 (extremely limited quantities available!)

  • Includes two “Welcome To Feedback” tasting items
  • General admission access to the event
  • Access to musical performances + the food & beverage areas
  • Custom laminate, available at check-in
  • Express entry to the event
  • Unlimited food  & beverage
  • “Skip the Line” access to all food & beverage
  • Private rooftop viewing deck overlooking the stage with a private bar

A message from the Lincoln Park Zoo: “We ask that you refrain from smoking for the health and safety of our animals and visitors.”

For more information, visit: FEEDBACKCHICAGO.COM