Marc Ribot & Buddy Miller w/ Minton Sparks

Thu Mar 31 2016

8:00 PM (Doors 7:30 PM)

The Basement East

917 Woodland St Nashville, TN 37206

$15 ADV / $20 DOORS

Ages 21+

Share With Friends

"Buddy Miller mixes gutsy roots-rock with country and folk and gospel such that the result is both brilliantly crafted and genuine...he shuffles or reconciles different styles like a post-modernist, but sounds utterly sincere and grounded...Which is another way of saying:  Buddy Miller is a first-class musical alchemist." - PopMatters

Guitarist Marc Ribot helped Tom Waits refine a new, weird Americana on 1985's “Rain Dogs”, and since then he's become the go-to guitar guy for all kinds of roots-music adventurers: Robert Plant and Alison Krauss, Elvis Costello, John Mellencamp.”  - Rolling Stones

In 2011, Buddy Miller, Marc Ribot, Bill Frisell and Greg Leisz came together to record under the moniker Majestic Silver Strings (New West Records). A rare meeting of these guitar greats, they spent five days in Buddy's studio and came up with a program of classic country songs and a couple of originals, enlisting a myriad of guest vocalists Patty Griffin, Julie Miller, Shawn Colvin, Emmylou Harris, Lee Ann WomackAnn McCrary, Chocolate Genius and the rhythm section of drummer Jay Bellerose and bassist Dennis Crouch to create "an intoxicating mix of roots music including atmospheric country ballads...[and} noir-ish, tangled ravers..." (Boston Globe)

At this years Americana Music Awards ceremony in September, Buddy as music director invited Marc to join him onstage to trade licks on the Hank Williams classic "Cold, Cold Heart" (broadcasted on Austin City Limits). The two later performed a full set for the Americana Music Festival, revisiting some of their Majestic Silver Strings material where ""Ribot’s acerbic, R&B-influenced licks added bite to the material, and Miller matched him lick for lick. It was a great hour of music — Ribot took Americana in new directions, while Miller provided a link to the music’s past" (Paste Magazine). 

Reviews of Buddy Miller & Marc Ribot at AMA Festival
-How Americana Music Fest Celebrates A Genre's History While Paving The Way For Its Future - Paste Magazine
-Best of Americana Fest 2015 - Nashville Scene

Marc Ribot & Buddy Miller w/ Minton Sparks

  • Sorry, you missed this event.
  • Check out other similar events on TicketWeb.
  • Marc Ribot

    Marc Ribot

    Jazz

    Marc Ribot (pronounced REE-bow) was born in Newark, New Jersey in 1954. As a teen, he played guitar in various garage bands while studying with his mentor, Haitian classical guitarist and composer Frantz Casseus. In 1978, Ribot crossed the river to New York City, where he served as sideman for such musicians as jazz organist Jack McDuff and legendary soul shouter Wilson Pickett. Ribot began his five-year stint as a member of the Lounge Lizards (John Lurie's innovative and influential Downtown jazz ensemble) in 1984. At the time, Marc's playing, which blended elements of classic Blues guitar with the ironic No Wave/Knitting Factory aesthetic, caught the ear of a number of artists who were also interested in amalgamating and disrupting disparate musical traditions. Ribot performed on some of these singer/songwriter's finest records, including Elvis Costello's SPIKE, MIGHTY LIKE A ROSE, and KOJAK VARIETY; Marianne Faithful's BLAZING AWAY; and Tom Waits' RAIN DOGS, BIG TIME, FRANK'S WILD YEARS, MULE VARIATIONS, and the recently released REAL GONE.

     All the while, the increasingly in-demand guitarist continued to explore the ever-changing terrain of New York's New Music scene, working with musicians such as Arto Lindsay, Don Byron, Anthony Coleman, T-Bone Burnett, the Jazz Passengers, Evan Lurie, the Sun Ra Arkestra, Chocolate Genius, Bill Frisell, Medeski Martin & Wood, and John Zorn in any number of incarnations.

     Ribot also composed and recorded his own brand of Downtown soul music with his bands, Rootless Cosmopolitans and Shrek. In 1996 his recording DON'T BLAME ME, a solo reinvention of American standards, received praise from the Village Voice as "a record filled with savory and unlikely amusements." In 1998 Atlantic Records released the critically acclaimed MARC RIBOT Y LOS CUBANOS POSTIZOS, featuring Ribot's beautifully slanted interpretations of material by the great Cuban songwriter Arsenio Rodriguez. In 2001, Atlantic released SAINTS, a solo work where Marc turned well known tunes such as The Beatles "Happiness is a Warm Gun" and Leonard Bernstein's "Somewhere" into left of center spacey sound collages.

     Musical scores by Marc Ribot include Yoshiko Chuma's ALTOGETHER DIFFERENT dance piece, a documentary film by Greg Feldman titled JOE SCHMOE, a feature film by director Joe Brewster titled THE KILLING ZONE, and IN AS MUCH AS LIFE IS BORROWED, a dance piece by famed Belgian choreographer, Wim Vanderkeybus.

     Marc's talents have also been showcased with a full symphony orchestra. Composer Stewart Wallace wrote a guitar concerto with orchestra specifically for Marc. The piece was premiered by the National Symphony Orchestra in Washington DC in July of 2004 and also appeared at The Cabrillo Festival in Santa Cruz, CA in August of 2005.

     Marc's free jazz group SPIRITUAL UNITY recently released an album on Pi Recordings, offering their unique take on the works of Albert Ayler. Marc and Spiritual Unity continue to perform, completing a European tour in the Fall of 2006. Ribot has also been focusing on his new project CERAMIC DOG, a guitar and composition heavy, rocking trio featuring Ches Smith on drums and Shahzad Ismaily on bass. The trio is currently recording material for an album and will perform live in Europe in the Spring of 2007 and indefinitely throughout New York and North America.

     Marc continues to be an active studio musician, prominently featured on Tom Waits' latest release "Real Gone," Medeski Martin and Wood's "End of the World Party," a solo record by T Bone Burnett and scores for "Walk the Line," "Everything is Illuminated," based on the best selling novel and "The Departed," Martin Scorsese's latest. Marc has also recently composed original scores for the PBS documentary "Revolucion: Cinco Miradas," and the film "Drunkboat," starring John Malkovich and John Goodman.

  • Buddy Miller

    Buddy Miller

    Country

    Pop stardom has, for many years, attuned listeners to the arrival of shining new faces filled with vital new ideas, to which attention must be paid. Instantly. Briefly, for the most part.

    It says here that there is another path, at least if what one cares about is music, and not celebrity. The steady lines in Buddy Miller’s face, the passions which abide within his voice, and the effortless inflection of his guitar…all matched against words given shape by and with his wife, Julie, her writing and singing voice twining against his…they speak, as well, to the arrival of genius. Just not clothed in the baggage of youth.

    It works like this: Malcolm Gladwell (the brilliant and best-selling synthesist of the varied research which seeks to explain how our brains work) recently summarized the research of a University of Chicago economist named David Galenson, who has been studying the age at which genius presents itself to the world. Two paradigms emerge. The precocious Pablo Picasso arrived as daunting and fertile talent in his early 20s, while the meticulous Paul Cézanne did not have an exhibition of his paintings until he was 57. Gladwell has also been advancing the thesis that it takes 10,000 hours to acquire mastery of any given skill.

    This explains the slow, steady career arc of Buddy and Julie Miller.

    Buddy will be 56 when Written in Chalk hits stores, though his work has been on regular exhibit since his wife, Julie (who is somewhat younger), began recording in 1990, and more so since he finally started making his own records in 1995. If his genius has not yet been widely recognized, no matter; the other musicians, they know. (There was a reason the final print edition of No Depression magazine proclaimed him to be artist of the decade, and it was not simply the mercurial humor of the magazine’s two editors. It was the music.)

    He has been a singer, and the successful writer and co-writer of songs other people sang, many of them country stars, including the Dixie Chicks, Lee Ann Womack, and Brooks & Dunn. He has been a multi-instrumentalist and harmony singer for a succession of acclaimed performers, beginning with Julie, and then in prompt succession Emmylou Harris, Steve Earle, Lucinda Williams. And, most recently, Alison Krauss and Robert Plant. And he has produced records – in the studio he built in their home — released separately under his name and Julie’s, and bearing their names together (as with Written in Chalk). That same living space has produced acclaimed albums by Solomon Burke, Allison Moorer, and Jimmie Dale Gilmore.

    For some years it was Julie who stood center stage, first back in Austin, Texas, where they met (she didn’t want the band to hire him), then in New York, San Francisco, Los Angeles, and, finally, Nashville, where they settled in 1993, a short drive from Music Row. Along the way the Millers became close friends and supporters of Shawn Colvin, Jim Lauderdale, Peter Case and Victoria Williams, played in bands with guitarists Larry Campbell and Gurf Morlix, and drummer Don Heffington.

    Worked on their art, slowly, surely. Perhaps uncertainly, but working, always. Beginning in 1990 Julie released four albums within the Christian market, and then two on the now shuttered roots label HighTone. Her last one, Broken Things, came out in 1999. Buddy has so far made five proper long players under his own name, though Julie’s singing and writing voice is ever-present throughout. And then, at last, in 2001, they finally, formally released an album under both names.

    Eight years later, one of the most respected creative teams in Nashville — and beyond — has returned with a new suite of songs.

    All things being equal, it’s a remarkable accomplishment. Both the album, and its making. Julie has had a tough time of it. Some years back she was diagnosed with fibromylgia (which is characterized by muscular pain, fatigue, and sleep deprivation), and so has had to cope with the ravages of a chronic illness. Five years ago her brother, Jeff Griffin, was struck by lightning while mowing their parents’ yard. She is a woman who feels deeply, and there is a careful emotional raggedness to many of the songs she unveils here. (And an unexpected helping of humor and joy, and abiding faith, too.)

    And Buddy…he’s just been busy. In the two weeks he had set aside to finish this album last spring — originally simply to have been another Buddy Miller album — he was also trying to learn several dozens of songs he would be playing on tour with Robert Plant and Alison Krauss. And to remember how to play the steel guitar he’d agreed to bring along for that gig. In between lining up production gigs, and the like.

    It didn’t get done. Or, rather, Written in Chalk didn’t get finished during that particular two-week slot, though he tried. But instead of simply meeting a deadline and turning in what he had finished, Buddy set the album aside and went back onto the road. This left time and room for a duet with Robert Plant (which they played publicly for the first time as part of the Americana Music Association’s 2008 Honors & Awards last September), and the additional gestation time seems to have emboldened Julie to become a full partner in the process. (Indeed, Buddy has only one co-write, and the balance of the album, save his well-chosen covers, comes from Julie’s pen.)
    Buddy was born near Dayton, Ohio, to an Air Force family, and mostly raised in Princeton, New Jersey. Julie Griffin was born and raised in Waxahachie, Texas. They met, in 1975, in Austin, when he auditioned for a band she was in. She didn’t take to him right off, but they’ve been married a long time.

    Only a couple of such confidence and competence could chance the emotional honesty of Written in Chalk. Only musicians of such renown could round up collaborators like Larry Campbell (who has played with Dylan, Levon Helm, and one or two others), keyboard player John Deaderick (Dixie Chicks, Mindy Smith), drummer Brady Blades (Emmylou Harris, Steve Earle), and singers like Patty Griffin, Emmylou Harris, and that guy who used to be in Led Zeppelin.

    But, in the end, only Buddy and Julie Miller could make a record this good.

    –written by Grant Alden

     

  • Minton Sparks

    Minton Sparks

    Music

    In the South, there are certain figures that take on a mythological air. They’re the folks that only have one name below the Mason-Dixon—the Dollys, the Garths, the Rebas of the world. They feel like family even though you’ve never met them; they make you rethink your patch of ground by telling you about theirs; they conjure some old storm inside you that you didn’t even know was brewing.

    Nashville speaker-songwriter Minton Sparks follows in the tradition of these legends—but on her own terms. She recently made her debut on the Grand Ole Opry at the Ryman Auditorium.

    Though her spoken word/honky-tonk hybrid performances elicit whoops, hollers, and general hell-raising from beer-swilling good ole boys and latte-sipping intellectuals alike; and though she’s been dubbed everything from the lovechild of Flannery O’Connor and Hank Williams to a backwoods Lucinda Williams, no one knows exactly what or who Minton Sparks really is.

    On the one hand, she’s a decorated poet, playwright, and author that’s been invited to prestigious events like the Geraldine R. Dodge Poetry Festival and Berry College’s Southern Women Writer’s Conference (alongside Maya Angelou and Kaye Gibbons). On the other hand, she’s a blue-collar troubadour that’s performed in the American Songbook Series at the Lincoln Center, appeared at the venerable Old Towne School of Folk Music, and served as teller-in-residence at the Jonesborough National Storytelling Festival.

    Whatever she is and whatever she’s doing, it’s working: Minton’s been featured on NPR’s All Things Considered, BBC’s Bob Harris Show, and WoodSong’s Old-Time Radio. This past year, she was selected as a Fellow at the Vanderbilt Curb Center for Art, Enterprise, and Public Policy. This year, she will be an artist in residence at the Banff Performing Arts Center. She’s also shared the stage with country and folk heavyweights like Rodney Crowell, John Prine, Nanci Griffith, and Punch Brothers.

    A Tennessee native, former social worker, divinity school dropout, first-ever Spoken Word Award recipient at the Conference on Southern Literature, and founder of The Nashville Writing and Performance Institute, Minton established herself as Nashville’s first non-singing country singer with the release of 2001’s Middlin’ Sisters, where she had a chance to collaborate with the legendary Waylon Jennings.

    Since then, she’s released two studio follow-ups—This Dress (2003), featuring a blues cut with Keb’ Mo. and Sin Sick (2005), where the Punch Brother’s Chris Thile haunted her words with his otherworldly mandolin—and a live record cut at Nashville’s Vahalla of bluegrass, The Station Inn.

    On her first three efforts, Minton tells the hilarious, humble, and heartbreaking tales of characters like Giddy Up Gibson and Wicked Widow Pots over earnest finger-picking and gospel piano. They’re vienna sausage vignettes that not only speak to Minton’s storytelling, but to her authenticity as a true southerner as well. As John Prine aptly put it, “Minton Sparks is a great storyteller—humanity with humidity, all told humorously with humility.”

    On her fifth release, Gold Digger, Minton breaks new (swampy) ground without losing an ounce of the hands-on-hip attitude of her earlier releases—and she’s enlisted legendary talent to help.

    Side A sees longtime Minton bandleader and guitarist John Jackson—a seasoned road warrior who has played with the likes of Bob Dylan, Lucinda Williams, Shelby Lynne, and Tom Jones—channeling Muddy Waters and John Fogerty instead of his usual Chet Atkins and Carl Perkins. If Jackson was picking and grinning on Minton’s previous releases, he’s grunting and moaning on Gold Digger. When paired with Minton, he completes the duo’s country-fried Mick and-Keith dynamic.

    Gold Digger’s first half might take you to the Delta, but Side B takes you on an airboat up to Nola. Guitarist Joe McMahan’s soulful Dixieland licks are accompanied by David Jaques (upright bass), and Shad Cobb (fiddle and banjo), making for what Nashville Scene andRolling Stone Country contributor Jewly Hight describes as a “sinewy swing.”

    Combine both halves of Gold Digger with production from the late, great Brian Harrison and stories about silicon-enhanced sugar-daddy hunters, and you’ve got a regular rural based opus. Just consider it another chapter in the already vibrant mythology of Minton Sparks.

Marc Ribot & Buddy Miller w/ Minton Sparks

Thu Mar 31 2016 8:00 PM

(Doors 7:30 PM)

The Basement East Nashville TN
Marc Ribot & Buddy Miller w/ Minton Sparks
  • Sorry, you missed this event.
  • Check out other similar events on TicketWeb.

$15 ADV / $20 DOORS Ages 21+

"Buddy Miller mixes gutsy roots-rock with country and folk and gospel such that the result is both brilliantly crafted and genuine...he shuffles or reconciles different styles like a post-modernist, but sounds utterly sincere and grounded...Which is another way of saying:  Buddy Miller is a first-class musical alchemist." - PopMatters

Guitarist Marc Ribot helped Tom Waits refine a new, weird Americana on 1985's “Rain Dogs”, and since then he's become the go-to guitar guy for all kinds of roots-music adventurers: Robert Plant and Alison Krauss, Elvis Costello, John Mellencamp.”  - Rolling Stones

In 2011, Buddy Miller, Marc Ribot, Bill Frisell and Greg Leisz came together to record under the moniker Majestic Silver Strings (New West Records). A rare meeting of these guitar greats, they spent five days in Buddy's studio and came up with a program of classic country songs and a couple of originals, enlisting a myriad of guest vocalists Patty Griffin, Julie Miller, Shawn Colvin, Emmylou Harris, Lee Ann WomackAnn McCrary, Chocolate Genius and the rhythm section of drummer Jay Bellerose and bassist Dennis Crouch to create "an intoxicating mix of roots music including atmospheric country ballads...[and} noir-ish, tangled ravers..." (Boston Globe)

At this years Americana Music Awards ceremony in September, Buddy as music director invited Marc to join him onstage to trade licks on the Hank Williams classic "Cold, Cold Heart" (broadcasted on Austin City Limits). The two later performed a full set for the Americana Music Festival, revisiting some of their Majestic Silver Strings material where ""Ribot’s acerbic, R&B-influenced licks added bite to the material, and Miller matched him lick for lick. It was a great hour of music — Ribot took Americana in new directions, while Miller provided a link to the music’s past" (Paste Magazine). 

Reviews of Buddy Miller & Marc Ribot at AMA Festival
-How Americana Music Fest Celebrates A Genre's History While Paving The Way For Its Future - Paste Magazine
-Best of Americana Fest 2015 - Nashville Scene