Lyrics Born w/ Vocab Kompany

Sat Oct 28 2017

9:00 PM (Doors 8:00 PM)

Star Theater

13 NW Sixth Avenue Portland, OR 97209

$17.00

Ages 21+

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The first thing you remember is the voice: that low, molasses-slow baritone that stretches into a long, humid Cajun drawl. Imagine that voice requesting a Mac Dre and a Main Source song. That voice asking to give a shout-out to a mythic crew called the Han Bodda Han Posse (proper spelling never confirmed), which definitively places that voice as yes, Bay Area. Finally, that voice giving you the name of the obscure sample the Geto Boys flipped for "My Mind's Playing Tricks On Me." And thereby winning the fifth on-air contest you've had in five weeks.

Something had to be done about that voice. "Man, stop calling already," you tell the voice. "You're disqualified. You can't win every time. Somebody else has to have a chance." And then the laugh--that high-pitched semi- automatic ratatat, heh-heh-heh-heh-heh! "Just come by the studio and hang out," you say, 'cause you're thinking it's actually a bit lonely broadcasting an after-midnight radio show into the darkness of the floodplain from Vacaville to Folsom prisons and all the suburban homes in between, and plus, who is this fool anyway? So the second thing you remember is the dude showing up to claim his Grand Daddy I.U. single: NorthFace jacket, oversized white T, Girbaud jeans hanging past plaid boxers, Air Maxes. Wait. This dude is Japanese? With curly Sicilian hair? Walking with a John Wayne horse-lope swagger? Everything about him was outside the box. This dude was born to break molds and move people.

Since then, that dude, now b/k/a Lyrics Born, has released 9 albums, 8 mixtapes, done countless guest tracks and collaborations, and become one of the most successful touring acts in the rap game. He's done it all indie. Some of that has been by default--the culture industry is still reluctant can and sell entertainers who look like LB. But his success has been all by design.

Tom Shimura was one of a star-crossed group of freshmen who arrived at the University of California, Davis in the fall of 1990, including the artists who would come to be known as DJ Shadow and Chief Xcel. I was lucky enough to be the college radio guy, and so I fell in with a crew (dubbed SoleSides after an Art Farmer song) that expanded to include the Gift of Gab, Lateef the Truth Speaker, Mack B-Dog, the filmmaker Joseph Patel, and others. He had come up in Berkeley, California in the 1980s, where the stereotype was still of patchouli hippies passing out flowers and acid, but where the reality was kids burning police cars during annual spring riots, demonstrators in shantytowns protesting South African apartheid, crackheads and dealers all across the southwest side, and as he recalls it, "homeless guys fluent in 20 languages, blowing bubbles on the corner, painted in polka dots." Hip-hop was the new Bay Area counterculture. We knew because the hippies hated it. But it was inescapable.

On weekends, graffiti crews did battle on middle-school walls two blocks from police headquarters. Telegraph Avenue was jammed with cars pumping trunk- smashing 808 bass tones. Ciphers of rappers, b-boys, and b-girls clogged the corner at Durant. Shimura learned all the words to "Rapper's Delight" in the schoolyard before he heard the song on the radio. It was the sound of the future, and he was already living in that future.

Soul'd Out & Engine Driver Proudly Present
Lyrics Born w/ Vocab Kompany

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  •   Lyrics Born

    Lyrics Born

    Music

    Amongst the dusty records of UC Davis' KDVS college radio station, Tom Shimura, who currently makes records as Lyrics Born, found too much to love. Sandwiched between gatefold LPs, 12-inch singles, dub versions and white-labels was a reservoir of inspiration that he would draw on for the following decades. That was then. This is now. Since his college days, Bay Area-native Lyrics Born's raw, authentic talent has been polished to a gleaming beacon of originality in a time when it's needed most, and it's release marks a new era of label relations. "The old model is dead, you cant just put it out and expect people to get it", explains LB, and the statement could easily be applied to his sound or his approach to marketing the finished product.

    Lyrics Born has gone about the creation of his latest effort, As U Were, in a less-than-conventional manner. One defining characteristic of his sound thus far has been that it can be described as unequivocally fun, and this remains true of As U Were. However, LB does routinely peel back the gregarious exterior to reveal a contemplative everyman, and it's times like this that his true artistry is apparent. "It's at the point in my career where I've been through a lot, fun and not so fun. I think I'm dealing with a lot issues that are more mature than the last few albums, from abandonment to betrayal to incredible joy". He voices these sentiments prominently on the lead single "Lies x 3", a driving, heartfelt plead for truth.

    While touching on newer subjects, he also reached out to artists that he felt removed himself from his comfort zone. "The new record is more synth-oriented. I made an effort to work with younger artists: Trackademicks, Francis and The Lights, and Sam Sparro, namely". The bay-swagger is in full effect on "Funky Hit Records", and while the new guests add a new dimension to the sound, Tom Shimura isn't one to lose sight of his roots. Gift of Gab drops a requisite, thought-provoking verse on the critical "Pills" and the classic Latyrx tag-team makes it look way too easy on "Pushed Aside, Pulled Apart", one of the album's standout cuts. As U Were may well be LB's greatest achievement, but it's been a long time coming.

    Lyrics Born had been a music obsessive since his youth, and in 1993 freestyles among a group of UC Davis classmates that occupied the same cramped radio quarters began to find their way onto paper, and suddenly LB had written "Send Them". It became the first single on the newly minted Solesides Records, a collaborative venture between himself and his accomplices who would later go on to be known internationally as Blackalicious (comprised of MC Gift of Gab and producer Chief Xcel), DJ Shadow and Lateef The Truthspeaker, an East Oakland rapper with whom he found a shared affinity for the rapid-fire lyrical volleys that would define the next step. As Latyrx (a combination of their working names) the two MCs released The Album, in 1997. The LP would go on to become a certified classic, selling 100,000 copies, yet would prove to be the tip of an even larger iceberg.

    Solesides was re-imagined as Quannum Projects in 1999. As co-owner, LB used Quannum as a conduit through which he delivered his most realized project to date, 2003's Later That Day. The album yielded his biggest commercial success to date, "Callin' Out", which charted nationally and was featured in several major motion pictures, EA Sports games as well as a Diet Coke spot featuring Adrian Brody. The remix LP, Same !@#$ Different Day was released shortly after, showcasing the talents of his closest associates and as well as new material. Meanwhile, Lyrics Born began to explore different means of engaging listeners. He kept fans abreast of his work by peppering the internet with The Lyrics Born Variety Show mixtape series which he released himself through his website. The mixtapes, as well as ceaseless touring and the creation of his own internet media outlets Lyrics Born TV and LBFM, were elements of a new formula.

    Since the release of Later That Day, Lyrics Born has averaged over 150 shows a year, and his explosive live energy was captured on the disc Overnite Encore, a compilation of live performances with live musicians from the Australian leg of his 2006 world tour. He followed up in 2008 with Everywhere At Once, a varied studio disk that signaled a departure from the sample-based pieces he had become known for, supplementing the sound with a full band and a healthy dose of synthesizers. Hence, he has arrived at well-rounded sound that is classic and yet futuristic. Tom Shimura hasn't forgotten how he got here, but he's never been afraid to look to the future, either.         

  • Vocab Kompany

    Vocab Kompany

    Alternative

    "A sound whose genre goes something like; hip-hop, soul, electro, funk. You have two Emcee's who charge sped-up lyrical flows; made to sound effortless...impressive and seamless synergy with their voices and their lyrics are playfully vivacious and positive." -Sam Dorman, NBC

    Vokab Kompany was started by Rob Hurt in 2006. His debut album Liquid Language featured Killer Priest of Wu-Tang Clan. This album featured Burkey on two tracks - "40Thieves" and "Soul Sista", which served as the start of the collaboration between the two. Burkey's accomplishments include opening for poet Maya Angelou with his band Native Root and featuring on MTV Thailand and Bakery Music hip hop compilation T Hop with the band The Golden Triangle.

    The band has most recently been releasing a number of acclaimed singles to keep the airwaves rocking. Their recent single "Turn Me Out" was released by Gravitas Records and featured Lyrics Born. Their single "Warm in the Light" from their collaborative EP with 9 theory titled "Beneath The Shallows" was featured by Forbes.[1]

    Their most recent LP, The Good Kompany Album, was released on January 20, 2016 to critical acclaim and includes guest features from Gift of Gab (rapper), Mitchy Slick, and more. The release was followed up by a headlining West Coast tour that featured special appearances by friends and fellow collaborators on the album.

    Vokab Kompany released V-Sides Vol. 1 (Kollabs and Remixes), a collection of collaborations, remixes and original songs, on New Kong Records December 17, 2013. It included features from The Polish Ambassador, The Grouch, Knight Riderz, Love and Light, Stephan Jacobs and an official Zion I remix.

    Vokab Kompany and Crush Effect released VKCE (a self-titled album) on New Kong Records December 18, 2012. The album featured 10 Hip Hop / Electronic tracks with 4 singles featured in national commercials / television shows. Most recently, VKCE has landed the song "World Wide" as the anthem for the new (Sacha Baron Cohen "The Brothers Grimsby" movie) as well as a spot on Ja Rule's MTV reality show. "Taking You Places" was picked up by Starz movie channel in (2014 STARZ trailer), "Back to the Past" (2013 Kia Optima "Blake Griffin Time Travels - 2006 Bench Press" commercial) and "Burn It Down" (Southern Comfort "Fiery Pepper" commercial). "Back to the Past" was also featured on the television show Franklin and Bash. VKCE debuted at #47 on the Itunes Hip Hop charts behind only major-label releases from T.I and Chief Keef among hip-hop albums released that week. Most recently VKCE has landed sync placements with MTV.

    Vokab Kompany's Single "So Bright" from the Album "Quit Sleep" has been featured in Kia Motors Summer Sales Event commercial (2010), NBC's hit The Today Show on January 14, 2011, and was the featured anthem in both 2014 & 2015 in South Lake Tahoe's tourism commercials.        

Soul'd Out & Engine Driver Proudly Present

Lyrics Born w/ Vocab Kompany

Sat Oct 28 2017 9:00 PM

(Doors 8:00 PM)

Star Theater Portland OR
Lyrics Born w/ Vocab Kompany
  • Sorry, you missed this event.
  • Check out other similar events on TicketWeb.

$17.00 Ages 21+

The first thing you remember is the voice: that low, molasses-slow baritone that stretches into a long, humid Cajun drawl. Imagine that voice requesting a Mac Dre and a Main Source song. That voice asking to give a shout-out to a mythic crew called the Han Bodda Han Posse (proper spelling never confirmed), which definitively places that voice as yes, Bay Area. Finally, that voice giving you the name of the obscure sample the Geto Boys flipped for "My Mind's Playing Tricks On Me." And thereby winning the fifth on-air contest you've had in five weeks.

Something had to be done about that voice. "Man, stop calling already," you tell the voice. "You're disqualified. You can't win every time. Somebody else has to have a chance." And then the laugh--that high-pitched semi- automatic ratatat, heh-heh-heh-heh-heh! "Just come by the studio and hang out," you say, 'cause you're thinking it's actually a bit lonely broadcasting an after-midnight radio show into the darkness of the floodplain from Vacaville to Folsom prisons and all the suburban homes in between, and plus, who is this fool anyway? So the second thing you remember is the dude showing up to claim his Grand Daddy I.U. single: NorthFace jacket, oversized white T, Girbaud jeans hanging past plaid boxers, Air Maxes. Wait. This dude is Japanese? With curly Sicilian hair? Walking with a John Wayne horse-lope swagger? Everything about him was outside the box. This dude was born to break molds and move people.

Since then, that dude, now b/k/a Lyrics Born, has released 9 albums, 8 mixtapes, done countless guest tracks and collaborations, and become one of the most successful touring acts in the rap game. He's done it all indie. Some of that has been by default--the culture industry is still reluctant can and sell entertainers who look like LB. But his success has been all by design.

Tom Shimura was one of a star-crossed group of freshmen who arrived at the University of California, Davis in the fall of 1990, including the artists who would come to be known as DJ Shadow and Chief Xcel. I was lucky enough to be the college radio guy, and so I fell in with a crew (dubbed SoleSides after an Art Farmer song) that expanded to include the Gift of Gab, Lateef the Truth Speaker, Mack B-Dog, the filmmaker Joseph Patel, and others. He had come up in Berkeley, California in the 1980s, where the stereotype was still of patchouli hippies passing out flowers and acid, but where the reality was kids burning police cars during annual spring riots, demonstrators in shantytowns protesting South African apartheid, crackheads and dealers all across the southwest side, and as he recalls it, "homeless guys fluent in 20 languages, blowing bubbles on the corner, painted in polka dots." Hip-hop was the new Bay Area counterculture. We knew because the hippies hated it. But it was inescapable.

On weekends, graffiti crews did battle on middle-school walls two blocks from police headquarters. Telegraph Avenue was jammed with cars pumping trunk- smashing 808 bass tones. Ciphers of rappers, b-boys, and b-girls clogged the corner at Durant. Shimura learned all the words to "Rapper's Delight" in the schoolyard before he heard the song on the radio. It was the sound of the future, and he was already living in that future.