Livingston Taylor, Rebecca Loebe

Wed Dec 4 2019

8:00 PM (Doors 7:00 PM)

The 20th Century Theater

3021 Madison Road Cincinnati, OH 45209

$30.00 - $35.00

All Ages

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Livingston Taylor’s career as a professional musician has spanned 50 years, encompassing performance, songwriting, and teaching. Described as "equal parts Mark Twain, college professor, and musical icon, Livingston maintains a performance schedule of more than a hundred shows a year, delighting audiences with his charm and vast repertoire of his 15 albums and popular classics. Livingston has written top-40 hits recorded by his brother James Taylor and has appeared with Joni Mitchell, Linda Ronstadt, Fleetwood Mac, and Jimmy Buffet. He is equally at home with a range of musical genres - folk, pop, gospel, jazz - and from upbeat storytelling and touching ballads to full orchestra performances. In addition to his performance schedule, Livingston is a professor at Berklee College of Music, passing on the extensive knowledge gained from his long career on the road to the next generation of musicians.

JBM Promotions Presents
Livingston Taylor with Rebecca Loebe

  • Livingston Taylor

    Livingston Taylor

    Folk Jazz

    Livingston Taylor picked up his first guitar at the age of 13, which began a 50-year career that has encompassed performance, songwriting, and teaching. Born in Boston and raised in North Carolina, Livingston is the fourth child in a very musical family that includes Alex, James, Kate, and Hugh. Livingston recorded his first record at the age of 18 and has continued to create well crafted, introspective, and original songs that have earned him listeners worldwide.

    From top-40 hits “I Will Be in Love with You” and “I’ll Come Running,” to “I Can Dream of You” and “Boatman,” the last two recorded by his brother James, Livingston’s creative output has continued unabated. His musical knowledge has inspired a varied repertoire, and he is equally at home with a range of musical genres—folk, pop, gospel, jazz—and from upbeat storytelling and touching ballads to full orchestra performances.

    Livingston has never stopped performing since those early coffeehouse days, shared the stage with major artists such as Joni Mitchell, Linda Ronstadt, Fleetwood Mac, Jimmy Buffett, and Jethro Tull, and he maintains a busy concert schedule, touring internationally. He is a natural performer, peppering his shows with personal stories, anecdotes and ineffable warmth that connect him to his fans. His relaxed on-stage presence belies the depth of his musical knowledge, and fans might just as often be treated to a classic Gershwin or something from the best of Broadway.

    Livingston is a full professor at Berklee College of Music, where he has taught a Stage Performance course since 1989. He teaches young artists invaluable lessons learned over the course of an extensive career on the road; the course is consistently voted the most popular at the College. Former students include Charlie Puth, Liz Longley, and Gavin DeGraw. His book, Stage Performance, released in 2011 offers those lessons to anyone who is interested in elevating their presentation standards to professional standards.

    Livingston's 50th year of making music was celebrated by Boston Mayor Marty Walsh and Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker, both declaring January 18, 2017 "Livingston Taylor Day". A documentary film entitled "Livingston Taylor: Life is Good" was released in 2018 at national and international film festivals. It has garnered many awards, nominations, and accolades, including The Van Gogh Award for the Feature Documentary category at the Amsterdam International Film Festival. The film is currently available to the public on Amazon. Click here to watch the trailer.

    In February 2019, Livingston released "The Best of LIVe - 50 Years of Livingston Taylor Live". This album features 11 song selections from his upcoming "LIVe - Livingston Taylor Live" Box Set. Upon release, the was ranked in the top 10 and his song "Good Friends" was #2 on the Folk DJ chart. All recordings are from live shows from 1969 through 2016 and have never before been released. The box set is set to be released in July 2019. In March 2019, the American Public Television special "Livingston Taylor Live from Sellersville: Songs and Stories" began broadcasting on PBS stations across the country. Click here to to watch the trailer.
     
  • Rebecca Loebe

    Rebecca Loebe

    Folk

    • She calls herself a singer-songwriter, but as soon as Rebecca Loebe leans into the first notes of Give Up Your Ghosts, her first release for Blue Corn Music (Feb. 8, 2019), that definition starts to seem woefully inadequate. 
    • 
Loebe is not just another talent. She’s a talent — a sophisticated, mature writer with a relevant point of view and an assured, nuanced voice that’s both elegant and earthy, powerful and delicate, with a range and depth she hints at more than flashes. When the moment’s right, however, she’ll glide up a scale like Norah Jones, or drop right into a crag in Fiona Apple’s sidewalk.
    • But timing and delivery alone don’t make an artist. There’s got to be substance as well, and Loebe fearlessly probes the rawest corners of her psyche to find it. “There's a lot of me talking to myself,” she says. “I’m writing a lot of empowerment jams these days, and I think it's because it's what I need. I've written albums full of what I needed to say, but this album is full of songs I need to hear.”


    •  
    • And now she’s on a guerrilla mission to share messages others need to hear as well. “I like to write catchy songs about topics that are meaningful to me, but use fun hooks to put words in people's mouths,” Loebe admits. “My favorite thing is to get people singing along before they even realize they're singing about women's equality or their own self-worth.”


    •  
    • Inventively marrying elements of folk, pop, rock, blues and jazz, Loebe takes vocal left turns when you think she’ll go right, or shifts from breezy to profound in a single phrase. And each surprising twist makes her music that much more entrancing.
    • 

Blue Corn’s Denby Auble was so enthralled by her 2017 album, Blink, he immediately invited her to join his Houston-based label (home to three-time Grammy nominee Ruthie Foster). By then, she’d already cast her spell over Kerrville Folk Festival New Folk Competition judges, who made her a winner in 2009, and talent scouts for The Voice, who asked her to audition for the show’s debut season. (Her version of Nirvana’s “Come as You Are” charted worldwide and landed on the show’s first compilation album.) Two years later, Alternate Root magazine ranked her ninth on its list of America’s top female vocalists. 


    • Turns out Loebe made the right choice when she decided she’d rather sing her own songs than work in a studio recording others’.
    • 

Born in Arlington, Virginia and raised in Atlanta, Georgia, Loebe was always musical. She picked up a guitar at 11 and honed her vocals in high school (where she also joined the wrestling team). After graduating at 16, she became the second-youngest member of her class at Berklee College of Music, and one of too few women studying audio engineering. But when a mentor encouraged her stay creative, she realized she wanted to sing the songs she’d secretly written for years. She took a job in a Boston studio, but snuck in after hours to record the demos that became her first album. 


    • Returning to Atlanta so she could tour without paying Boston rents, she hooked up with studio owner and producer Will Robertson, who’d helped birth that album and a follow-up EP. Bartering studio work for recording time, she recorded 2010’s Mystery Prize, which spent 2½ months on the Americana Music Association’s airplay chart and made its yearend top 100.


    • Amid constant touring, Loebe spent so much time in Austin, she finally moved west in 2011. That year, she also released a B-sides-and-outtakes EP, and watched herself singing to 12 million viewers on The Voice. She spent the next two years opening for Ellis Paul on her first national tour, and performing in Europe and Japan. She also started inviting songwriter friends over for weekly potluck dinners. They shared dishes, then tunes. 


    • “For my last couple of records, almost every song has gone through the filter of that group,” Loebe says. “It's not just the feedback that's important — in fact, that’s not as helpful as having to think critically about everyone else’s songs each week, for months on end, because it gets me thinking critically about what resonates with me; what expresses an idea most impactfully.”
    • 
When she was ready to record Give Up Your Ghosts, she called Robertson first. “We’re very comfortable together,” she says. “We trust each other and have a longstanding agreement not to shoot down ideas. We try each other’s suggestions and then communicate honestly about how they’re working.”
    • 

They returned to Austin’s ChurchHouse Studio, where she’d recorded Blink. “I just love that space,” Loebe says. “There's something really vibey about it. It has a lot of cool old analog equipment. Everything works well, but not too well. It's not pristine or clinical; it's just a very warm and inviting space.”
    • 
She also used the same players, originally recruited to capitalize on existing musical relationships because she didn’t yet have a gig-tightened band. 


    • “I thought I'd take a shortcut and get a rhythm section that had years of chemistry,” Loebe explains. She started with longtime friend Andrew Pressman on bass. He called his jamming buddy since fourth grade, drummer Robin MacMillan. Then came Christopher Cox, another Pressman pal, on keyboards; Raina Rose, Loebe’s neighbor, touring partner and bestie, on harmonies; and another longtime friend, guitarist and harmony singer Anthony DaCosta, now a rising star in Nashville.
    • 

Loebe says their bonds were critical, not only because they had fun, but because they wanted to do their best to support or impress one another. The only players added for Give Up Your Ghosts were pedal steel player Gary Newcomb and vocalist Heather Mae, who contributed more harmonies. 


    • But despite that familiarity, making this album was quite different from her previous experiences, Loebe says.


    • “Typically, I'd spend years writing songs, then pull 10 or 12 that felt like they fit together,” she notes. “In this case, I just went through this writing spree and had all of these songs swell up inside me at once. They were written within a three- or four-month period — one organic moment in time.”

    • That’s partly why the album seems to have a loose theme. Several songs examine struggles to fit in or overcome painful chapters, as in the wistful “Tattoo,” originally written for a character on a TV show. The same exercise produced the sexy, dramatic “Got Away,” which really showcases Loebe’s vocal range. 


    •  
    • “Growing Up,” the opening track, addresses the challenges women face, starting in childhood, in what is still a man’s world. 


    • Loebe wrote it during a songwriting retreat, but it wasn’t shaping up the way she wanted, so she took a break — and wound up having the pop ballad “Ghosts” jump into her head almost whole, in one stream-of-consciousness thread. It starts with the striking line, Have you ever tried to fall asleep, twisted in a stranger’s sheets.
    • 

In the chorus, Loebe sings, Give up all your ghosts, at least the ones you love the most, they’re never holding you as close as you are holding them.
    

“This line is the mission statement of the record, and practically my whole life right now,” Loebe says. “I’m trying to encourage everyone to let go of what no longer serves us. To stand taller, walk lighter. We can’t outrun our pasts, but we get to decide who we are and what we will let define us.”

Please correct the information below.

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Select Tickets

limit 10 per person
Orchestra Section

Seated in the section closet to the stage

$35.00
Main Floor

Seating behind the orchestra section

$30.00

Delivery Method

Mail
Will Call
JBM Promotions Presents

Livingston Taylor with Rebecca Loebe

Wed Dec 4 2019 8:00 PM

(Doors 7:00 PM)

The 20th Century Theater Cincinnati OH
Livingston Taylor, Rebecca Loebe

$30.00 - $35.00 All Ages

Livingston Taylor’s career as a professional musician has spanned 50 years, encompassing performance, songwriting, and teaching. Described as "equal parts Mark Twain, college professor, and musical icon, Livingston maintains a performance schedule of more than a hundred shows a year, delighting audiences with his charm and vast repertoire of his 15 albums and popular classics. Livingston has written top-40 hits recorded by his brother James Taylor and has appeared with Joni Mitchell, Linda Ronstadt, Fleetwood Mac, and Jimmy Buffet. He is equally at home with a range of musical genres - folk, pop, gospel, jazz - and from upbeat storytelling and touching ballads to full orchestra performances. In addition to his performance schedule, Livingston is a professor at Berklee College of Music, passing on the extensive knowledge gained from his long career on the road to the next generation of musicians.

Please correct the information below.

Select ticket quantity.

Complete the security check.

Select Tickets

All Ages
limit 10 per person
Orchestra Section
Seated in the section closet to the stage
$35.00
Main Floor
Seating behind the orchestra section
$30.00

Delivery Method

Mail
Will Call