Knuckle Puck, Hot Mulligan, Meet Me @ The Altar, Anxious

Fri Feb 11 2022

7:30 PM (Doors 6:30 PM)

The Castle Theatre

209 E Washington St Bloomington, IL 61701

$23.00

All Ages

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The Castle Theatre will require all guests attending any of our Indoor Shows at the venue to show PROOF OF FULL VACCINATION — OR — A NEGATIVE COVID-19 TEST performed within 72-hours prior to entry. Patrons will be asked to show their valid vaccination card or test result (photocopies or digital copies are permissible) alongside a government-issued ID when they arrive at the door.

Per CDC guidelines we are also asking all guests to consider wearing a mask unless actively drinking, no matter your vaccination status.

See more information on The Castle Theatre’s COVID-19 Policy here.

Kickstand Productions Presents:
Knuckle Puck, Hot Mulligan, Meet Me @ The Altar, Anxious

  • Knuckle Puck

    Knuckle Puck

    Punk

    In early 2017, Knuckle Puck entered the studio to record the follow-up to Copacetic—their 2015 breakthrough that debuted in the Top 10 of five different Billboard charts, earned a nomination for Album of the Year at the 2016 Alternative Press Music Awards and launched them from the Chicago suburbs to a place among the most beloved acts of the modern pop-punk genre.

    But midway through the process, the band (vocalist Joe Taylor, guitarists Nick Casasanto and Kevin Maida, bassist Ryan Rumchaks and drummer John Siorek) realized they were on the wrong path. They weren’t only making the wrong album for Knuckle Puck—they were making the wrong album for themselves. They knew they had no choice but to start from scratch.

    “Having such a struggle and being so disconnected in the recording process felt wrong,” Casasanto explains. “It felt so wrong, and we were all afraid to talk about it. There was some denial when we realized what was unfolding.”

    Discouraged but undefeated, the band changed producers, eventually landing back with Copacetic producer Seth Henderson, and began rebuilding the songs they’d written from the ground up. Knuckle Puck’s first attempt would have produced a fine album, but their second created the right one.

    The result is Shapeshifter, due October 13 on Rise Records. Despite its title, the album isn’t a reinvention for the band; rather, it’s the sound of Knuckle Puck taking their best qualities and honing them to make them even sharper. The songwriting became tighter and more deliberate, the lyrics more introspective and urgent—without losing an ounce of the sweat-soaked authenticity and passion that made Copacetic so captivating. Above all, it’s an album that proves the band are unflinchingly unwilling to compromise when it comes to their art. That’s a sentiment reinforced throughout Shapeshifter’s main lyrical theme—the importance of identity—which was only magnified during their first studio session.

    “When you reach early adulthood and start to see your life take shape, it’s also important to shape your identity and break yourself free from anything that might be holding you down,” Casasanto says. “That was a glaring parallel between what was going on with the record and what we were writing about at the time. Although it was tumultuous, I truly think we wouldn’t have written the same record without going through what we did.”

    Throughout their struggle, Knuckle Puck grew stronger and more confident in themselves, something the band ultimately want listeners to take from Shapeshifter.

    “I hope the album instills a little bit of hope in people,” Casasanto says. “You look at politics and how fast the world is now, everything the internet is bringing to the world. It’s difficult to form an identity when there’s so much in your face. I hope people realize they should consume the things that really speak to them. Through that, I feel like it’s the most satisfying way to be who you want to be.” XX

  • Hot Mulligan

    Hot Mulligan

    Pop Punk

    Like many bands last year, Lansing, Michigan’s Hot Mulligan—the #1 Hot New Band per their Facebook page—put out an LP in 2020 that they didn’t get to tour. This year, they’ll release I Won’t Reach Out To You, a six-track EP that operates as a response to their 2020 full-length You’ll Be Fine. The EP is bookended on the first and last tracks by a resounding glance-back at a world that simply doesn’t exist anymore: “Stay home, stay home/You said it wouldn’t make a difference whether we could be together or not.”

    On opener “One For The Boy,” those words are a serene, mournful observation, but by “Please Don’t Cry, You Have Swag,” they’re a volatile explosion, a group-yelled diagnosis set to thundering guitars, bass, and drums. These facts also explain Hot Mulligan: a group of shitposting gamers from far reaches of Michigan (and one from Iowa) who became best friends at college and started making music that works through the endless weirdness of growing up in this moment. The result of these things is earnest, affecting emo punk, presented with a song title created by typing into autocorrect with eyes closed.

    “Nothing is black and white,” says rhythm guitarist and backing vocalist Chris Freeman. “I like to think that we challenge each other mentally and as friends to do better and grow together. We’re also just shitposters and trolls.”

    Freeman and lead vocalist Nathan “Tades” Sanville came up together playing in local punk bands in rural Michigan before moving to Lansing in search of greater opportunity, where they met lead guitarist Ryan “Spicy” Malicsi and drummer Brandon Blakeley. “When the music just becomes a reflection of life and growing up, then when we’re bonding over music, we’re bonding over our lives together,” says Freeman.

    That intimacy and interdependence works in extremes. “You see your friends in their lowest places,” says Freeman. “But you also see them when they’re doing everything they wanted to do.”

    The band recorded I Won’t Reach Out To You in Pilesgrove, New Jersey with producer Gary Cioni (Grayscale, Free Throw) at his Sound Acres Studio. Freeman, Cioni and Dash Williams shared engineering duties. The majority of the record was written in studio over the course of a two-week period.

    The EP details the first major dying-off of connections and relationships in a life. It’s an experience that’s familiar but always jarring. You spend your youth hearing your parents talk about friends they haven’t seen in years, and you think how ridiculous that sounds. Then suddenly, you’re 25, and realize you haven’t spoken with your old best pal since high school graduation. It happens fast, and it’s weird.

    “It’s not always about not reaching out to someone because they’re toxic,” says Freeman. “It’s just because people grow apart.”

    I Won’t Reach Out To You is an exploration of this process that constantly reproduces itself across our lives, which forces us to square two facts: those times and the people we knew were awesome, and they’re over now, forever. Freeman says it’s about “reminiscing on people you knew in the past, but acknowledging that the past is the past.”

    “One For The Boy” introduces this over a gentle wash of guitar and ghostly vocals as Sanville laments, “Hey, I feel us growing apart/Could we just talk or is it not the right time?” A snare drum rolls in the distance and goes quiet, and in bursts earworm pop punk blast “Featuring Mark Hoppus” on compressed, crunchy guitars and Sanville’s full-tilt belt: “I kinda miss you/Back in highschool/25 and I still think about your drawings that you made.”

    “Losing Days” follows with acoustic guitar and Sanville’s breathless vocals: “Losing days because it’s hard to reason leaving the bed/Debt’s been building since we got here/Staying the same/Forget it!” It’s a tight 90 seconds that give way to “Pop Shuvit (hall of meat, duh),” a perfect slice of pounding, Taking Back Sunday-style emo pop that tracks the tiring relentlessness of growing up while realizing that no one at the top is looking out for you.

    “Please Don’t Cry, You Have Swag” closes on nostalgia and a cruel coming-to-terms with the passage of time, as clear finger-picking broods and Sanville’s vocals long for a return to an impossible before: “You think I matter less than politics/When all I want is fresh paint, before we ever would’ve talked like this.” The final minute crescendos into a shattering breakdown while Sanville repeats the first song’s remarks to a backing chorus of, “Stay home, stay home.”

    Hot Mulligan are just as likely to write a beautiful, devastating treatise on growing apart—both literally and spiritually, from your friends and your old self—as they are to make a song and video about putting on sunglasses (which they have done). This is the Hot Mulligan way: life is serious and scary, but you just gotta make a meme about it with your buds.

  • Meet Me @ The Altar

    Meet Me @ The Altar

    Pop Punk

    Meet Me @ The Altar present a new musical and cultural paradigm for pop punk. The Florida-based trio— Edith Johnson [vocals], Téa Campbell [guitar], and Ada Juarez [drums]—write the kinds of anthems that you can scream along to at a festival, head-bang to in a club, or sit with while in your feelings at home. The women may have met via YouTube - in true modern-day fashion - but the band shares a classic mission. Flipping the script for rock music and its culture, they bring together elements of Warped Tour- era punk, 2010s pop, and easycore. At the same time, their 2021 EP, Model Citizen [Fueled By Ramen], projects a different kind of message loud and clear.

    “To me, Model Citizen is about acknowledging that you aren’t where you would like to be in life,” says Téa. “You’re experiencing those lows and highs that put everything into perspective and show you the steps you need to take. The idea of Model Citizen isn’t reality, because no one can be perfect. However, you can recognize the need to be better. If you’re on any kind of stage, you’re going to be a role model, whether you want to be or not. We’re honored to be in a position where people are listening, so we’re going to encourage them.”

    “You’re hearing this message directly from us,” adds Edith. “We’re writing everything. When you’re women of color in a band, it’s easy for everyone else to forget the most important thing...We’re not just brown women; we’re musicians.”

    Music initially bonded them. Orlando native Téa linked up with New Jersey-born Ada after she heard Ada’s cover of Twenty One Pilots’ “Holding On To You” on YouTube. The lineup solidified with the addition of Edith from Atlanta. Florida became their de facto home base as the three-piece made the most of every meet-up, practicing for hours on end and gigging. Upholding a D.I.Y. ethos, Téa took the reins and booked their first tour as the group got in a van and threw down at shows in support of the Changing States EP in 2018. In 2020, early champions such as Halsey, Alex Gaskarth of All Time Low, and Dan “Soupy” Campbell of The Wonder Years came forward as the trio inevitably inked a deal with Fueled By Ramen.

    On the heels of singles “Garden” and “Hit Like A Girl,” widespread tastemaker praise followed. The FADER christened them “One of the most exciting young pop bands in the United States,while Rolling Stone hailed them as “One of 2021’s most exciting new rock acts.Vulture predicted, “Meet Me @ The Altar make a convincing case that the future of pop-punk is Black, Latina, and female.Meanwhile, Nylon summed it up succinctly, “Meet Me @ The Altar is the future of pop-punk.

    While amassing critical acclaim, they tirelessly wrote and recorded music, maintaining an impressive standard of perfectionism.

    “In March 2021, we had a whole EP written, and we scrapped it,” admits Edith. “We wrote Hit Like A Girl, and something had changed. Before that, the music was a little more relaxed. Hit Like A Girlwas so

    energetic and hard-hitting. We wanted everything to feel cohesive and flow. The evolution had to make sense.”

    Days before entering the studio, the band wrote an entirely new EP. They decamped to Indiana with frequent collaborator Roye Robley, stayed in a “semi-shady hotel,” and recorded Model Citizen. Musically, it struck a balance between influences as diverse as Ke$ha, P!nk, and Chunk! No, Captain Chunk!. Nothing was off the table—from towering vocal runs to a double bass barrage. The group introduced the EP with “Feel A Thing.” Video game-style synths give way to a chugging riff as Edith’s confessional lyrics bleed into a chanting refrain punctuated by a harmonic swell.

    “When I wrote it, life felt really weird,” reveals Téa. “There was a sense of numbness. It’s okay to not be positive all of the time, because life isn’t positive all of the time. Especially through COVID-19, it was hard to find a purpose when you’re isolated by yourself. You don’t know where you’re headed and feel a little lost. By acknowledging you’re searching for purpose, you get closer to happiness.”

    “Mapped Out” alternates between upbeat instrumentation, lyrical introspection, and vocal ad-libs. Trumpeting a clarion call, Edith admits, “I’ve gotta keep searching,” as her voice dips in and out of a distorted breakdown. Propelled by a pummeling beat and punchy guitar, “Brighter Days (Are Before Us)” signals the sunshine on the horizon with an affirmation. “It’s about feeling sad, but realizing there are better days ahead,” says Edit.

    Then, there’s the riff-heavy “Never Gonna Change,” which Téa describes as “about accountability and admitting you’re the reason for your problems.” The EP culminates on the thundering groove of “Wake Up” where one final onslaught ends with a reminder “Stop freaking, freaking out”—and a lot of laughter.

    “After taking accountability, you’re like, ‘Okay, what am I going to do about this?’,” explains Téa. “So, you realize, ‘I’m not alright. I need to wake up. I need to do something. I don’t want to be like this’. It ties into the theme of Model Citizen and trying to become who you want to be in your head.”

    “When we grew up listening to this kind of music, nobody looked like us,” Ada leaves off. “Since we didn’t have anyone to look up to, we knew we had to give the next generation of girls a band to look up to. We want to influence people. We want to be those role models. We want to lead the revolution of looking like us and making music. It’s weird it hasn’t happened sooner.”

    “It’s happening now,” adds Téa.

    BOILER

    Meet Me @ The Altar present a new musical and cultural paradigm for pop punk. The Florida-based trio— Edith Johnson [vocals], Téa Campbell [guitar], and Ada Juarez [drums]—write the kinds of anthems that you can scream along to at a festival, head-bang to in a club, or sit with while in your feelings at home. The women may have met via YouTube - in true modern-day fashion - but the band shares a classic mission. Flipping the script for rock music and its culture, they bring together elements of Warped Tour- era punk, 2010s pop, and easycore. In 2020, early champions such as Halsey, Alex Gaskarth of All Time Low and Dan “Soupy” Campbell of The Wonder Years came forward as the trio inevitably inked a deal with Fueled By Ramen. On the heels of singles “Garden” and “Hit Like A Girl,” widespread tastemaker praise

    followed from The FADER, Rolling Stone, Nylon, and Stereogum. Meanwhile, Vulture predicted, “Meet Me @ The Altar make a convincing case that the future of pop-punk is Black, Latina, and female.While amassing critical acclaim, they tirelessly wrote and recorded what would become their 2021 EP Model Citizen [Fueled By Ramen], set for arrival on August 13th. 

  • Anxious

    Anxious

    Pop Punk

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Terms & Conditions

COVID-19 POLICIES
For the love of live music and in order to keep our shows as safe as possible for audiences, performers, and venue staff alike, each venue has developed its own policies to mitigate the spread of COVID-19. Some of these policies include masking and showing proof of vaccination and/or a negative COVID test result. Stay up to date with each venue's COVID-related public health policies at by visiting the venue website for the most current information prior to attending the show. Policies are subject to change at any time.

We remain committed to providing a safe and enjoyable atmosphere for all performers, staff and patrons and thank you for your support.

For more information on COVID-19, vaccines & resources please visit CDC.gov & vaccines.gov

COVID-19 DISCLAIMER - This ticket is a revocable license and may be taken up and admission refused upon refunding the purchase price appearing hereon and is grounds for seizure and cancellation without compensation. Holder of this ticket (“Holder”) voluntarily assumes all risks and danger incidental to the game or event for which this ticket is issued whether occurring prior to, during, or after same, including, but not limited to, contracting, and/or spreading the COVID-19 virus, and agrees that the organization, venue, presenter, agents, participants, or players are not responsible or liable for any injuries, sickness, or death resulting from such causes. Holder acknowledges that the COVID-19 pandemic remains a threat to individual and public health, COVID-19 is a highly contagious disease transmitted through human contact and respiratory droplets (including through the air and via common surfaces) and it is possible that Holder may contract COVID-19 while at the game or event for which this ticket is issued. Holder agrees by use of this ticket not to transmit or aid in transmitting any description, account, picture, or reproduction of the game or event to which this ticket is issued. Breach of the foregoing will automatically terminate this license. Holder agrees that the license comprised by this ticket may be removed and Holder may be ejected from the game or event for which this ticket is issued in the event that Holder violates any law, ordinance, or venue regulation. Holder grants permission to the organization sponsoring the game or event for which this ticket is issued to utilize Holder’s image or likeness in connection with any video or other transmission or reproduction of the event to which this ticket relates.
Kickstand Productions Presents:

Knuckle Puck, Hot Mulligan, Meet Me @ The Altar, Anxious

Fri Feb 11 2022 7:30 PM

(Doors 6:30 PM)

The Castle Theatre Bloomington IL
Knuckle Puck, Hot Mulligan, Meet Me @ The Altar, Anxious

$23.00 All Ages

The Castle Theatre will require all guests attending any of our Indoor Shows at the venue to show PROOF OF FULL VACCINATION — OR — A NEGATIVE COVID-19 TEST performed within 72-hours prior to entry. Patrons will be asked to show their valid vaccination card or test result (photocopies or digital copies are permissible) alongside a government-issued ID when they arrive at the door.

Per CDC guidelines we are also asking all guests to consider wearing a mask unless actively drinking, no matter your vaccination status.

See more information on The Castle Theatre’s COVID-19 Policy here.

Please correct the information below.

Select ticket quantity.

Complete the security check.

Select Tickets

All Ages
limit 4 per person
General Admission
$23.00

Delivery Method

ticketFast

Terms & Conditions

COVID-19 POLICIES
For the love of live music and in order to keep our shows as safe as possible for audiences, performers, and venue staff alike, each venue has developed its own policies to mitigate the spread of COVID-19. Some of these policies include masking and showing proof of vaccination and/or a negative COVID test result. Stay up to date with each venue's COVID-related public health policies at by visiting the venue website for the most current information prior to attending the show. Policies are subject to change at any time.

We remain committed to providing a safe and enjoyable atmosphere for all performers, staff and patrons and thank you for your support.

For more information on COVID-19, vaccines & resources please visit CDC.gov & vaccines.gov

COVID-19 DISCLAIMER - This ticket is a revocable license and may be taken up and admission refused upon refunding the purchase price appearing hereon and is grounds for seizure and cancellation without compensation. Holder of this ticket (“Holder”) voluntarily assumes all risks and danger incidental to the game or event for which this ticket is issued whether occurring prior to, during, or after same, including, but not limited to, contracting, and/or spreading the COVID-19 virus, and agrees that the organization, venue, presenter, agents, participants, or players are not responsible or liable for any injuries, sickness, or death resulting from such causes. Holder acknowledges that the COVID-19 pandemic remains a threat to individual and public health, COVID-19 is a highly contagious disease transmitted through human contact and respiratory droplets (including through the air and via common surfaces) and it is possible that Holder may contract COVID-19 while at the game or event for which this ticket is issued. Holder agrees by use of this ticket not to transmit or aid in transmitting any description, account, picture, or reproduction of the game or event to which this ticket is issued. Breach of the foregoing will automatically terminate this license. Holder agrees that the license comprised by this ticket may be removed and Holder may be ejected from the game or event for which this ticket is issued in the event that Holder violates any law, ordinance, or venue regulation. Holder grants permission to the organization sponsoring the game or event for which this ticket is issued to utilize Holder’s image or likeness in connection with any video or other transmission or reproduction of the event to which this ticket relates.