Joyce Manor / Jeff Rosenstock w/ Remember Sports

Sun Feb 3 2019

8:00 PM (Doors 7:00 PM)

The Basement East

917 Woodland St Nashville, TN 37206

$20 ADV /$23 DOS

Ages 18+

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Music City Booking Presents:
Joyce Manor / Jeff Rosenstock w/ Remember Sports

  • Joyce Manor

    Joyce Manor

    Pop Punk

    Let’s start the story of Joyce Manor’s Million Dollars To Kill Me at the end of Million Dollars To Kill Me—at the last not-even two minutes of “Wildflowers,” a song about light and beauty and wonder that ends the record like a sunrise after a long exhausting night. It’s not a sing-along single or a bleaked-out slow-burner. It's brief, understated, and simple but sophisticated as it says what it needs to say in seven sharp lines. And it ends the album with a question instead of an answer, because on an album like this, questions are more honest. If 2016’s Cody was about growing up, then Kill Me is about what happens next—the reckonings with love, money, doubt and confusion, and the hope that persists despite it all. That’s where “Wildflowers” comes in. Says Barry Johnson, band co-founder/guitarist/vocalist: “‘Wildflowers’ is my favorite song on the record—maybe my favorite song I’ve ever written. It’s about how something can be so beautiful it breaks your heart.”  

                That’s Million Dollars To Kill Me: an album that glides across that tension between two perfectly opposite feelings. That’s even how the guitars fit together. It’s in the way co-founding guitarist Chase Knobbe can somehow make a song sound sadder and tougher at the same time, says Johnson, or the way Johnson mixes minor and major chords to invoke a precise kind of overpowering melancholy. (“I like when songs have a feeling of yearning,” says Johnson. “It just feels good to me. Makes you wanna cry.”) It’s even in the way the album was made because it didn’t start as a Joyce Manor album at all.

                After Cody, Johnson contacted Impossibles’ guitarist/vocalist Rory Phillips—“One of my musical heroes,” he says—to produce the next Joyce Manor album. Phillips couldn’t fit the commitment between work and family, but another idea materialized: what if Johnson and Phillips made a new band together? Over email, of course, since they were thousands of miles apart? So Johnson would send his half, and Phillips would send a whole song back, and it worked well. (“It was just really exciting to mail away for a song,” says Johnson.) Then it worked too well. When Johnson asked Knobbe to add some guitar—on the original “Wildflowers,” actually—he understood what was happening. What he’d thought of as “weird songs that were created with fake drums between two guys who were never in the same room with each other” were revealing themselves as the start of a new Joyce Manor record. 

                So they made a new Joyce Manor record. With Knobbe, new drummer Pat Ware—“Awesome new drummer,” adds Johnson—and longtime bassist Matt Ebert, they wrote enough songs to fill a full-length, and then worked to get the ones lifted from emails to match the ones written at full volume. (“Bedroom charm versus live rock band,” Johnson explains.) Their next step was a new step: their first time recording outside their L.A. hometown, at Converge’s Kurt Ballou’s GodCity studio in Salem, Massachusetts. They recorded daily 10-to-6 so Ballou could spend dad time with his kids at night, and then slept right upstairs in bunk beds: “Kinda felt like camp,” says Johnson. “It was a pleasure—I would recommend it to anyone.” 

                Kill Me kicks off with “Fighting Kangaroo,” part Jawbreaker wit and part Jawbreaker grit, while follow-up “Think I’m Still In Love With You” digs deep into that pit between pleasant memory and unpleasant present. (Or is that what “Friends We Met Online” does?”) There’s the instantly catchy “Silly Games,” the deadpan blue album Weezer-style pop song where Johnson and Phillips started everything, and the Britpop-py (or Teenage Fanclub-by) title track, with a final line that lands like a boulder toppling off a cliff. There’s the acoustic “I’m Not The One,” with equal connections to Big Star, Billy Bragg and San Pedro hometown hero Todd Congelliere, who could make a sing-song playground melody sound profound. There’s a little studio-inspired experimentation: e-bow on “I’m Not The One” and glockenspiel on “Silly Games,” both Joyce Manor firsts. (“I never once suggested putting glockenspiel on anything but I think it works!” says Johnson.) And finally there’s “Wildflowers,” that unexpected inspiration for turning weird songs with fake drums into real songs with real drums and real everything, really. That’s how Kill Me began, and that’s how it ends—clear, honest, direct and true. Which is about all you could ask for, whether you’re starting a record or finishing it. Or listening to it. 

  • Jeff Rosenstock

    Jeff Rosenstock

    Ska Punk

    Jeff Rosenstock is a musician from Brooklyn via Long Island (which I guess is like saying Long Island via Long Island) who has sang and written songs for Bomb the Music Industry!, Kudrow and The Arrogant Sons of Bitches.

  • Remember Sports

    Remember Sports

    Punk Revival

    Basement rock band, Remember Sports has reunited in Philadelphia, after completing college in the place where it all started for them — Gambier, Ohio. Forming in 2012, the band’s first official recordings began as a collection of demo songs recorded for Kenyon College radio station, WKCO. The demos were late redone to become their first official album, Sunchokes which was released in the spring of 2014. 

    After a period of touring beyond the Buckeye State, Remember Sports went on to release their second album, All of Something in the fall of 2015 on Father/Daughter Records. The release was recorded in Philadelphia alongside noted DIY producer and musician Kyle Gilbride (Waxahatchee, Girlpool, Swearin’), and featured a fuller sound for the band. The album received critical acclaim, with Rolling Stone calling it “full of sharp, sweet insight and heart-tugging hooks.” 

    Nearly two years since the release of All of Something and Remember Sports is making their return with a 7” split alongside Father/Daughter label mates, PLUSH, out on Oct. 20. The split features members Carmen Perry (vocals and guitar), Jack Washburn (guitar and vocals), Catherine Dwyer (bass) and Benji Dossetter (drums). Singles, “Making It Right” and “Calling Out” are punched up, energetic moments of sincerity, with Remember Sports taking the innermost emotions that others are keen to keep rolling about in their heads and hearts and putting them to song. Fuzzy, earnest and declarative, these singles are the perfect way to hold fans over as Remember Sports continues work on future new material.

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We do not accept tickets from 3rd party sites.
BACKPACKS are not allowed inside the venue.
Most shows are standing room only.
Handicap accommodations can be arranged.

ALL 18 AND OVER SHOWS ARE NO RE-ENTRY. If you leave the venue, you will not be allowed back in. Thanks!

Music City Booking Presents:

Joyce Manor / Jeff Rosenstock w/ Remember Sports

Sun Feb 3 2019 8:00 PM

(Doors 7:00 PM)

The Basement East Nashville TN
Joyce Manor / Jeff Rosenstock w/ Remember Sports

$20 ADV /$23 DOS Ages 18+

Please correct the information below.

Select ticket quantity.

Complete the security check.

Select Tickets

Ages 18+
limit 4 per person
G.A
$20.00

Delivery Method

ticketFast
Mail
UPS
Will Call

Terms & Conditions

This event is 18 and over. Any Ticket holder unable to present valid identification indicating that they are at least 18 years of age will not be admitted to this event, and will not be eligible for a refund.

No Backpacks allowed in the venue.
ALL PATRONS MUST BRING A VALID FORM OF IDENTIFICATION.
The name on your ID must match the name on your ticket.
We do not accept tickets from 3rd party sites.
BACKPACKS are not allowed inside the venue.
Most shows are standing room only.
Handicap accommodations can be arranged.

ALL 18 AND OVER SHOWS ARE NO RE-ENTRY. If you leave the venue, you will not be allowed back in. Thanks!