Jordan Mackampa w/ Babeheaven

Wed Apr 1 2020

8:00 PM (Doors 7:00 PM)

Tractor

5213 Ballard Avenue NW Seattle, WA 98107

Ages 21+

Share With Friends

Share
Tweet

Like the soul greats he grew up with and the grime artists he adores, Jordan Mackampa makes music to tells truths as much as entertain. His searing songs are documents of his life as an outsider, his sound a melting pot of cultures that stretch from his birthplace in the Republic of Congo to a hip hop-obsessed childhood in north London to teen years spent immersed in indie-rock in Coventry.

 

From his breakthrough in 2017 with the protest song "Battlecry" to this autumn’s acclaimed "What Am I", hailed a modern take on Marvin Gaye’s "What’s Going On", Jordan’s powerful message music has grown rapidly in scope and scale, soaking up new influences and becoming more complex.

A debut album due in March, produced by Dani Castelar, best known for his work with Paolo Nutini, sees Jordan scaling fresh heights, adding sumptuous strings, gospel backing vocals and grime influences on his contemporary soul fused with his Congolese roots.

“You’ll hear the Congolese influence across the album,” says Jordan. “It’s there in the rhythms, in the swing and syncopation that ties the tracks together. It’s a sound I’ve heard at home for as long as I can remember.

Featuring Nutini’s regular string players and a bevvy of brilliant backing vocalists, the album addresses subjects including Jordan’s upbringing, his struggles with his faith and, on Foreigner, a ballad that builds in to an epic immigration anthem, the racism he faced on moving to Britain from the war-torn Republic of Congo at the age of one, leaving his father and six half-siblings behind.

“My whole life I’ve never felt like I fitted in,” says Jordan. “Growing there were very few black families. I didn’t look like anyone else. I wasn’t allowed to play with the other kids.

“At school no one understood me because French was my first language. I learnt English very quickly, but if I spoke in English at home, my mum would tell me that I was losing touch with my culture. I felt torn between two worlds.”

Follow us on Twitter @tractortavern
Jordan Mackampa w/ Babeheaven

  • Event Cancelled.
  • Jordan Mackampa

    Jordan Mackampa

    Pop-Soul

    The Coventry raised, London based singer is the perfect combination of his Congolese roots and midlands upbringing. His soul soaked, deeply personal tracks swim in the sounds and stories of the cities he’s inhabited over the years. Inspired by his mother’s love of the great soul singers, Marvin Gaye, Bill Withers and Curtis Mayfield, Jordan combines his timeless vocal with catchy melodies and heart felt lyrics to create a soulful sound which will enchant and uplift in equal measure.

    Jordan has previously been supported by the likes of NME, Wonderland, Clash, Mahogany & The Line of Best Fit; built up over 30M streams across previous releases & has sold out 4 headline shows in London, played support slots at Village Underground, Shepherd’s Bush Empire and Hyde Park’s British Summertime.

    New Music will be coming soon and will firmly position him as one of the best up and coming British male soul singers.
  • Babeheaven

    Babeheaven

    Indie Pop

Follow us on Twitter @tractortavern

Jordan Mackampa w/ Babeheaven

Wed Apr 1 2020 8:00 PM

(Doors 7:00 PM)

Tractor Seattle WA
Jordan Mackampa w/ Babeheaven
  • Event Cancelled.

Ages 21+

Like the soul greats he grew up with and the grime artists he adores, Jordan Mackampa makes music to tells truths as much as entertain. His searing songs are documents of his life as an outsider, his sound a melting pot of cultures that stretch from his birthplace in the Republic of Congo to a hip hop-obsessed childhood in north London to teen years spent immersed in indie-rock in Coventry.

 

From his breakthrough in 2017 with the protest song "Battlecry" to this autumn’s acclaimed "What Am I", hailed a modern take on Marvin Gaye’s "What’s Going On", Jordan’s powerful message music has grown rapidly in scope and scale, soaking up new influences and becoming more complex.

A debut album due in March, produced by Dani Castelar, best known for his work with Paolo Nutini, sees Jordan scaling fresh heights, adding sumptuous strings, gospel backing vocals and grime influences on his contemporary soul fused with his Congolese roots.

“You’ll hear the Congolese influence across the album,” says Jordan. “It’s there in the rhythms, in the swing and syncopation that ties the tracks together. It’s a sound I’ve heard at home for as long as I can remember.

Featuring Nutini’s regular string players and a bevvy of brilliant backing vocalists, the album addresses subjects including Jordan’s upbringing, his struggles with his faith and, on Foreigner, a ballad that builds in to an epic immigration anthem, the racism he faced on moving to Britain from the war-torn Republic of Congo at the age of one, leaving his father and six half-siblings behind.

“My whole life I’ve never felt like I fitted in,” says Jordan. “Growing there were very few black families. I didn’t look like anyone else. I wasn’t allowed to play with the other kids.

“At school no one understood me because French was my first language. I learnt English very quickly, but if I spoke in English at home, my mum would tell me that I was losing touch with my culture. I felt torn between two worlds.”