Jerry Reed Tribute, Joshua Hedley, Brian Wright, Allen Thompson, Adam Chaffins, Brit Taylor, Boo Ray, Lauren Morrow, Nathan Kalish, Sophie Gault, Brooks Forsyth, Sean Thompson

Wed Feb 28 2024

7:30 PM (Doors 6:00 PM)

3rd and Lindsley

818 3rd Ave. S Nashville, TN 37210

$24.76

All Ages

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HOUSE BAND: 
Adam Meisterhans, David Guy, Jon Radford, Philip Sterk, Robbie Crowell, Emmanuel Echem, Keshia Bailey, Rachel Rodridguez, Justin Martin

Jerry Reed Tribute With Special Guests Joshua Hedley , Brian Wright , Allen Thompson , Adam Chaffins , Brit Taylor , Boo Ray , Lauren Morrow , Nathan Kalish , Sophie Gault , Brooks Forsyth & Sean Thompson

  • Jerry Reed Tribute

    Jerry Reed Tribute

    Music

  • Joshua Hedley

    Joshua Hedley

    Folk Rock

    Joshua Hedley is "a singing professor of country & western,” he declares on his new album, Neon Blue. As an ace fiddle player, a sharp guitarist, and a singer with a granite twang, Hedley has been a presence in Nashville for nearly twenty years; although you have to know where to find him. You have to brave the tourists on Broadway, bypass the three-story bars blasting Journey, and make your way to Robert’s Western World, a time-capsule honkytonk from a different era, an oasis in a town where twang is constantly being run down by pedal pubs. 
  • Brian Wright

    Brian Wright

    Country

    Brian Wright is an American singer-songwriter from Waco, Texas. His debut album, Dog Ears was released in 2006, quickly followed by a sophomore effort, Bluebird in 2007. After signing with Sugar Hill Records, an American Bluegrass and Americana record label, Wright has recorded two more albums.
  • Allen Thompson

    Allen Thompson

    Country

  • Adam Chaffins

    Adam Chaffins

    Country

    ADAM CHAFFINS, WITH HIS ROOTS FIRMLY EMBEDDED IN EASTERN KENTUCKY SOIL, IS A SINGER/SONGWRITER AND TALENTED INSTRUMENTALIST WHO NEVER FEARS BREAKING GENRE BARRIERS.

    Chaffins finds his inspiration in diverse musical styles and personal experiences.  Creating a new lane of country and Americana music laced with tinges of R&B and indie rock, his multi-genre sound is distinctive while being comfortably familiar.

    His debut solo album, Some Things Won’t Last, released February 2020, was born from the constant evolution of Chaffins’ music, honoring past experiences while always moving forward. Wide Open Country praised the nine-song album as “everything from fuzz-toned, drum-driven rockers to ballads laced with symphonic swells, not to mention a gorgeous cover of Keith Whitley's ‘I'm Over You’.”

    NPR named Chaffins one of “The Best New Artists Playing AmericanaFest” in 2019. His Whitley cover was recognized by Rolling Stone, as “cinematic … that prizes layers over dense heaps of sound.” NPR declared Chaffins “attuned to the potential sophistication of downhome forms – the jazzy complexity and expressive depth of bluegrass and country” with a “billowy, rhythmic unplugged rendition” that “artfully captures transparent denial and agonized pining.”

    The single release of “Her” followed, with a video premiere by Billboard. Videos for “I’m Over You” and “Her” spent months on the fan-voted CMT 12-Pack Countdown, with “Her” reaching the No. 1 spot on the same day his debut album, Some Things Won’t Last, was released.

    Chaffins is an indie artist who grew up along Kentucky’s famed Country Music Highway 23 fascinated by the 80’s and 90’s country music stars from there.  In his teen years, Chaffins’ ears were attracted to the hits on the radio, but by the end of high school, he had grown more interested in bluegrass and jazz.   He moved to Louisville to study, curiously enough, classical voice on scholarship at Bellarmine University. After less than a year, he was drawn back to eastern Kentucky and Morehead State University to explore what its Kentucky Center for Traditional Music had to offer and to refocus on jazz.  He moved to Middle Tennessee, but, after one year, graduate school was replaced with real life and real work as a musician.

      Chaffins quickly found his traction as an award-winning songwriter and an in-demand bassist.  He was being recruited regularly for session work, including with renowned producers such as Buddy Miller and Dave Brainard. He spent years performing in bluegrass bands, including as bassist for Town Mountain and as vocalist and bassist for Rounder Records' The Deadly Gentlemen.

    Chaffins was ready to craft his own sound. His first solo album, born from the constant advancement of his music by honoring past experiences while always moving forward, created a new palate of sound that might not have existed before and invited diverse audiences that might not have come together before.

    Chaffins, who prides himself on embracing every kind of style from country and folk to pop and rock, makes a genuine effort to never limit his songwriting or his music. Today, he transforms the dichotomy of his experiences into a melodic, moody mix that highlights his assertive, soulful baritone and his command over a band’s energy. Whether his musical ingenuity is an evolution or revolution, Chaffins continues to transport listeners to a place where unity and freedom can be realized.

     
     
  • Brit Taylor

    Brit Taylor

    Country

    In a town known for dealing hard knocks, country singer/songwriter Brit Taylor hasn’t flinched.  After a decade “of playing by the rules”, she broke out on her own and did it her way. Her hard work and determination are paying off. Today, she is quickly becoming known for her loyalty to tradition while embracing a uniquely modern sound, for her unwaveringly honest and relatable lyrics, and for her sultry yet powerful alto. Her highly acclaimed debut album Real Me (opening after just 10 days as the highest-ranking debut album on the AMA/CDX Radio Chart at No. 37 and receiving positive reviews from American Songwriter, Rolling Stone, NPR’s World Cafe and others) was a self-reflective journey to self-awareness from the depths of despair. Next up was her break-out year sophomore album, Kentucky Blue, a happier, more upbeat record that is feisty, funky and pure country.  Produced by the legendary duo of Sturgill Simpson and David Ferguson, the album debuted at No. 4 on the Bluegrass albums Billboard chart and stationed itself on the Americana chart for weeks in the Top 20.  Her Kentucky Blue tour took her from Maine to San Diego and from Key West to Seattle, including 14 headliner shows on the West Coast, as well as solo performances at major music festivals including CMA Fest, Railbird, Key West, Laurel Cove, Master Musicians, and multiple stages at Americanafest.  Recognized repeatedly as one of country music’s emerging artists, the Kentucky native had a song on the TV hit show “Tulsa King” and has supported musicians across the country including Dwight Yoakum, Margo Price, Brent Cobb, Blackberry Smoke, Turnpike Troubadours, Kelsey Waldon, Charles Wesley Godwin, Dayton Farley and others. 

    Born where the famed Country Music Highway 23 slices through the Kentucky mountains, she grew up with family and music – and idols she loved – Chris Stapleton, Loretta Lynn, Tyler Childers, Dwight Yoakum, Patty Loveless, Ricky Skaggs and so many more.  Life was good for the singer who spent her childhood years on the Kentucky Opry, followed by a move to Nashville, a college degree, a music deal, marriage, and a mini-farm.  All that was good suddenly went bad. A husband gone AWOL, a band that dissolved, a beloved dog that died, a car that just quit, a music deal gone sour and a bank that wanted her home made for a winter of despair.  After a brief wallow in self-pity, Brit went to work, determined to make her music her way.

    Sick, tired and broken hearted from the “new Nashville” and the type of songs she was expected to write, she boldly walked away from her song writing deal. Brit cleaned houses to pay the bills and successfully turned her side hustle into a bona-fide small business.  At the same time, she served as “general contractor” for her self-financed first album, pulling together a cast of professionals to write with her, play with her and market her, all while recording on her own, newly-created record label, Cut A Shine Records. Her acclaimed second album of original music soon followed, and, as she proudly said on the Grand Ole Opry stage, “I am not too proud to clean toilets” if it makes it possible for me to make music that I love and am proud to share.  What could have broken her only strengthened her; instead she is thankful for the hardships that shaped her into the person she is and led her to the life she enjoys. 

    It is why the power of her songwriting and music is that they are refreshingly simple yet surprisingly complex.  She gifts listeners with songs that offer a background for life’s laughter or a shoulder to lean on for life’s tears. Authentically true in her life, in her music and in her songs, Brit Taylor is the real deal.

  • Boo Ray

    Boo Ray

    Country

  • Lauren Morrow

    Lauren Morrow

    Singer-Songwriter

    People Talk is the album Lauren Morrow was born to create. The Nashville-based, Atlanta-raised singer-songwriter has spent the better part of the last fifteen years cultivating her sound, pouring in a variety of influences, and honing her live show until the sound felt unabashedly her own. After spending more than a decade as the frontwoman of popular Americana band The Whiskey Gentry, Lauren stepped out with a 2018 self-titled debut EP and received widespread acclaim. She landed on many Best Of year end lists from Rolling Stone to Garden & Gun, filmed an episode for PBS’ “Bluegrass Underground” and toured the US playing festivals such as Pickathon and Bristol Rhythm & Roots. However, there were so many parts of her that remained creatively silent through the years. Sure, with her soprano voice and vulnerable vibrato, she could belt a country tune with the best of them. And yes, she could write a fast-paced, witty, Americana banger with the bands she fronted before. But what about all of the influences and truths she knew were untapped? The years of obsessing over 90s Alternative, BritPop and 80s New Wave bands with moody, brutally honest lyrical content and rock n roll attitudes that she so deeply loved? With the encouragement of her husband and business/creative partner, Jason, she mined those memories and dug into the root of who she is, pulling the pieces together to forge sincerity and vulnerability into an uninhibited creative work.  

    When it came time to write the songs for her first full-length record, Lauren knew she had to find those around her who could pull her out of the Americana rut and inspire her to tap into parts unknown. After moving to Nashville in 2017, both Lauren and Jason found the community they so desperately wanted, including a mental/songwriting guru in producer Parker Cason. “It was the best decision we’ve made. We decided in July 2017 to move and we sold our house, packed our bags, and moved here less than two months later. We met Parker almost immediately, and it felt so kindred to me. I’d finally found someone who understood all of my influences and could really see the vision beyond what I’d done in my prior career.” They began writing and recording the songs for People Talk in 2019. Lauren found herself finally writing the songs she always knew were within her, and together they created a soundscape that reflects her eclectic well of influences and songwriting growth since moving to Nashville.“I used to write stories, made up things about others I’d imagined in my head, but this record is all true to me. There’s not a single lyric that hasn’t happened to me in some shape or form, and I think it’s taken me to this point in my life to be able to articulate it and confidently stand behind the vulnerability of it all, which isn’t easy for me. I didn’t want to be defined anymore by my past musical experiences or feel like I was ‘enough,’ because my past bands didn’t quite ‘make it.’ In my head I was thinking, ‘Geez, she’s in her 30s and releasing a debut record? Shouldn’t she hang it up already? Her time is running out.’ But in reality, I had to silence that negative voice, and let myself show through these songs, and it’s taken all of this time and these experiences to really shape who I am as a human. I feel like I’m just now figuring that out, and now I finally have something to say.”   

    While recording for People Talk began at Sound Emporium in November 2019, the pandemic put an immediate stop to the record production, forcing Lauren to surrender to the uncontrollable (not an easy task for her) and learn to trust the cosmic alignment that awaited her debut record. It also fully committed Lauren and Jason to their craft - they knew they had a great set of songs and now they had the extra time to fully plan its wealth of soundscapes and its release. They truly learned the meaning behind the word “Hustle,” just like Track 7 on People Talk, implies - they painted houses to make ends meet when touring stopped, took out a second mortgage on their East Nashville home to self fund the release, and even sold a little “Mary Jane” to pay for players on the record and studio time. Determined to never give up on this dream, they made use of every resource and every free minute - they transmuted all of that angst and uncertainty into the originality of this record.   

    You’ll find even more of these universal truths on People Talk: arguing with a loved one and just wanting the fight to be over (“I’m Sorry”) or doing whatever it takes to live your dreams (“Hustle”) and trying to find whatever brings you peace when you’re having anxiety attacks (“Only Nice When I’m High”) or having to claw your way through self doubt (“Nobody But Me”). “I just want the stories on this record to feel relatable and real. We’re constantly fed a fake narrative through social media and reality TV, etc, and I just want to come across as the person I am. Flaws and all.”  

    That “realness” came early to Lauren as a child. On the surface, she had a fairly conventional childhood, riding her bike around her suburban Atlanta neighborhood and stealing her older brother Kris’s alternative rock albums. From there she fell into a world of U2, Oasis, David Bowie, The Beatles, Jeff Buckley, Outkast, The Cure, Depeche Mode, Nine Inch Nails, Alanis Morrisette, and Tori Amos. She gravitated towards lyrics that made her feel deeply and allowed a form of escape. Her homelife turned tumultuous - her parents’ constant fighting ultimately led to a divorce, and her mother fell into addiction which drove Lauren to further retreat into her room and into her headphones. Never the “popular girl” but always oddly confident in her nerdy quirkiness, she bought her first guitar at 15 and realized she possessed a tool to express herself through song and also escape the chaos around her. That same year, she won a radio contest that allowed her to sing with Butch Walker in front of 90,000 fans and ultimately changed the trajectory of her life - she knew she wanted to play music forever.   

    As Lauren moved further into adulthood, she was still rattled by adolescent trauma and ultimately felt trapped in Georgia. “I wanted to get away as far as possible, and by doing so, I was able to disconnect from that baggage, responsibility, and codependency I’d felt for my mom as a teen and really spread my own wings and discover myself.” She moved to Newcastle, England and dug more into her songwriting and eventually found the confidence to perform in front of others. Up until then, she only sang in front of a very small group of trusted friends. Moving to the UK changed Lauren in a way she didn’t fully understand until she came back home to the states. As much as she wanted to get away, she missed the South. She returned home self-assured and with the initial building blocks of her sound.  

    At Georgia State University, Lauren majored in English and started her first band, where she was lead singer, songwriter, and guitarist. She met Jason shortly thereafter. They fell in love, broke each other's hearts, but ultimately settled into their destiny together where they have been creating music and a life ever since. Lauren credits Jason with pushing her to fullest potential. “He was the person who always had my back as soon as he heard me sing. He’s always believed in me even when I didn’t - whether it was in The Whiskey Gentry, or now as a solo artist, we’ve been on the journey together, and it’s really special.”   

    A firm believer in timing and synchronicities, Lauren knows that every moment in her life thus far has led her to make People Talk. The untapped musical influences, the move to Nashville, the people in her life, her childhood, and decades of touring, writing, and fronting bands has all melded within her to explode in the form of ten songs that express a woman fully formed. “I couldn’t be more proud of anything in my life. It’s real, and it’s me. Finally.”   

    People Talk will be released on March 31, 2023 via Lauren & Jason’s own label Big Kitty Records. 

  • Nathan Kalish

    Nathan Kalish

    Americana

    Nathan Kalish is a multi-instrumentalist, producer, engineer, and wandering storyteller. Born in Milwaukee, WI, to missionary parents, he was moved around for most of his formative years. By the time Kalish had graduated high school, he had already lived all over the Midwest, as well as Western Europe and directly after the wall fell in Eastern Europe.” He then spent over a decade performing music across both, playing bars and Honky-Tonks for 200+ shows a year. Now he lives and creates in Nashville, TN.

    On his latest full-length album, Great Big Motel Bed in the Sky, Nathan explores Loss and Love while being accompanied by his band The Derechos. It’s an imperfect lyrical balance between Sincerity and Absurdity, with a sonic mix of Harmony and Grit. Produced by Kalish, this Is a 10- song effort tracked in 3 days at Trace Horse Studio and mixed by Kalish at the Maroon Lagoon. It is inspired by Psychedelic Folk-Rock, and Cosmic Country sounds from the United States of Americana and beyond.

    Nathan’s extensive back catalog of independent releases and hard-touring work ethic has landed him on stages with Lucinda Williams, Black Rebel Motorcycle Club, Lucero and many other current and legacy acts. As a result, he’s earned accolades from Rolling Stone CountryBillboard, American Songwriter, Saving Country Music, and several other international press outlets. In addition, his writing has been compared to Tom Petty, John Prine, Gram Parsons, and Paul Westerberg.

    Even with unexpected curves and bumps in the past two years, Nathan Kalish’s committed relationship with the road is one that still has many more miles to go with a busy 2022 planned. Great Big Motel Bed in the Sky will mark an important chapter in Kalish’s creative journey, which is constantly in transit.

  • Sophie Gault

    Sophie Gault

    Music

    “Nashville can be a place where you lose yourself a little bit,” says singer-songwriter Sophie Gault, while reminiscing about her move to Music City back in 2014. Gault understands this two-sided sentiment more than most, after getting caught up in her own moment serendipitously meeting Americana icon, Julie Miller, at local haunt Bobby's Idle Hour – an experience meaningful enough for Gault to honor Miller’s song “Broken Things” through the name of her earnest alt-country band Sophie & the Broken Things.

    And indeed, while the frenetic energy of Nashville can leave some musicians lost after launch, Sophie & the Broken Things have only continued to evolve since the release of an eponymous EP in January 2020 – even during the lost year of live music that would soon follow. Now with the reemergence of real world connection, Gault's notion has flipped from being lost in the crowd, to joyously losing yourself in the palpable energy of a live show and a vivid story, a feeling that's easy to embrace when listening to Sophie & the Broken Things' forthcoming debut album, Delusions of Grandeur

    While tracking the new songs, Gault caught the attention of another Nashville legend: GRAMMY Award-winning producer Ray Kennedy, who is known for his own country hits from the early ‘90s, as well as his work with artists such as Steve Earle, Rodney Crowell, and Lucinda Williams. Serving as an unofficial advisor throughout the recording process and then mixing and mastering the resulting 10-song set, Kennedy has fostered a special interest in the project, saying, “Sophie’s songs have a cozy familiarity with a feeling reminiscent of some of my favorite records from the ’70s: timeless yet new, with an emotional delivery I don’t hear in other contemporary records. The lyrics combine visual storytelling with melodies that make me want to sing along, and the band electrifies the many moods with textural tones of nostalgia to full-on rock ’n’ roll.”

     

    The nostalgic, timeless feel of Gault’s songwriting and guitar skill is fueled by early years spent living on a Maryland farm – cultivated through many afternoons listening to and imitating the likes of Freddie King and Keith Richards, as well as a musical bond Gault shared with her father since childhood. 

    “My dad was big into music and he was really big into blues and early 60s rock and stuff like that,” Gault says. So that’s what he always played and we would play together. I [channel] a lot of his riffs that he taught me so it always will come out in my playing and my singing like, ‘Ooo, that’s from back home, definitely from back home’.” 

    Right from the unfurling of opener “Golden Rule,” the atmosphere of a memory begins to descend, as a delicate finger-style hook from Gault's acoustic guitar and the hazy reverberations of notes from an electric fill the room with a contemplative energy, preparing the listener for the grippingly relatable stories to come. 

    Gault’s duet with Logan Ledger in “Trouble,” echoes far more bold recollections. Still, bold feelings don’t always mean clear stances, as the song’s metaphor-driven reflections reveal quite the internal contradiction while the pair insist they just don’t work as a couple: Baby, we fit like the pieces of a jigsaw puzzle / Like thunder and lightning / bad luck and some broken things / Some dirt and a shovel / You, me & trouble. Meanwhile, “Dashboard's” tale of emotional avoidance in the face of rejection is delivered with the kind of candour anyone slow to start their day, or possibly hungover while working through their own heartache, can see themselves in: I got up and pulled on last week’s clothes / Wrinkled in a pile on the floor / Poured some coffee, it was black and cold / I drank it and walked out the door. 

    Though the straightforwardly titled “Churches and Bars” seems to describe parts of Nashville, Gault unveils the song's original ties to her home in Oneonta, New York. “I put the finishing touches on 'Churches and Bars' after I moved to Nashville but it's really about Oneonta,” says Gault. “There are so many churches and I don't know if this is still true but I think this was true at some point: that Oneonta had the most bars per square mile of any town in upstate New York.”

    While parts of Delusions of Grandeur's sonic skeleton – with its 12-string guitar, resonator, pedal steel, and dobro – evoke the bold rootsy styles of artists like Margo Price, Sturgill Simpson, and Lucinda Williams, Gault's modest but deeply emotive vocal vibrato also calls to mind the rivetingly vulnerable performances of Jewel Kilcher's early music. Gault's endings to words, verses, and choruses both pierce the air and float about – their messages imparted with stronger fervor from an extra moment's sustain. “Far Away's” minimalist three-part arrangement lets the emotional impact of Gault's voice shine in this way, as a blend of astonishment and audible pain ring out in her exclamations to a beloved figure who abandons her. 

    In making Delusions of Grandeur, Gault recognized just how much having an in-person connection shapes her music and that remained a key aspect of the album's development process, even as the resources and people available to the band grew and changed from the previous release. 

    "When we went in to record, it was very natural and organic,” says Gault. “It was like a small group of people  – [engineer] Ryon (Westover), Twon, and Lemmy – just kind of sitting in Ryon's house, throwing ideas back and forth, seeing what works.” 

    During a brainstorming session for “Churches and Bars,” Gault even found herself caught up in her own grand reverie of sorts, transported to a place, and given the feelings of her younger self, as she worked out a solo with the band.

    “Jules had already laid out this great guitar solo but I wanted to try adding something so, I plug in my electric guitar and play this little solo on the second half of the song. We ended up keeping it – it's kind of like a dueling solo. It was fun; I felt like a teenager in my room, playing along to this great band.”

    There's an immersive richness in the way Gault describes different facets of the human experience, whether in her songs or from the vantage point of the stage. “I've always enjoyed playing shows where people are having fun, laughing, and talking,” Gault says. “You know, the lighting is low, you can hear glasses clinking…” 

    And though the past two years have brought lots of unforeseen and unwelcome change, Gault is confident that this album can help bring genuine feelings of goodness back to the world – and that's no delusion of grandeur. 

    “Two years ago I didn't know if there was going to be a place for the music I do. Now I think there's a place for what we do and people are going to gravitate towards that. Genre doesn't really play that big of a role anymore. It's more about vibe, and grooves, and people like what they like.”

  • Brooks Forsyth

    Brooks Forsyth

    Country

    Hailing from the mountains of North Carolina, Brooks Forsyth is a musician of Appalachia and beyond. He began busking on street corners in his hometown of Boone, NC and has since become a Nashville recording artist.  Encompassing a variety of sounds within Americana, he has a large repertoire of original songs, and a versatile guitar style consisting of both flatpicking and fingerpicking techniques.  

     

    Throughout the last seventeen years, Brooks has performed solo and with a variation of musical ensembles across the U.S.A. He has played alongside artists such as Doc Watson and Sierra Ferrell, and opened for Cristina Vane, Town Mountain, and Willi Carlisle.  He has also worked with producer Buzz Cason, and film director Nigel Dick. Additionally, Brooks was the lead songwriter, vocalist, and guitarist for the band The Major Sevens.

     

    Brooks’ latest record Black Zipper was recorded at The Brass Clip in Nashville, TN with producer Parker Cason. Brooks currently has five solo albums available: Black Zipper (2023), Live at Sunbanks (2022), So Much Beyond Us (2018), On The Lam And Lonesome (2016) and Back In Cackalacky (2015), and one album with The Major Sevens Goodbye Baby (2008).

     
     
     
  • Sean Thompson

    Sean Thompson

    Music

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Jerry Reed Tribute With Special Guests Joshua Hedley , Brian Wright , Allen Thompson , Adam Chaffins , Brit Taylor , Boo Ray , Lauren Morrow , Nathan Kalish , Sophie Gault , Brooks Forsyth & Sean Thompson

Wed Feb 28 2024 7:30 PM

(Doors 6:00 PM)

3rd and Lindsley Nashville TN
Jerry Reed Tribute, Joshua Hedley, Brian Wright, Allen Thompson, Adam Chaffins, Brit Taylor, Boo Ray, Lauren Morrow, Nathan Kalish, Sophie Gault, Brooks Forsyth, Sean Thompson

$24.76 All Ages

HOUSE BAND: 
Adam Meisterhans, David Guy, Jon Radford, Philip Sterk, Robbie Crowell, Emmanuel Echem, Keshia Bailey, Rachel Rodridguez, Justin Martin

Please correct the information below.

Select ticket quantity.

Complete the security check.

Select Tickets

All Ages
limit 10 per person

Prices include all fees. Any applicable taxes will be added at checkout.

GA info
$24.76

Delivery Method

Will Call

Terms & Conditions

Tickets are non-refundable and non-transferrable.

WE ONLY ACCEPT TICKETWEB TICKETS.

Seating for each show are different.

Handicap accommodations can be arranged. Please contact the venue ahead of time.