Hot Water Music - 30th Anniversary Tour

Mon May 13 2024

8:00 PM (Doors 7:00 PM)

Howard Theatre

620 T Street NW Washington D.C., DC 20001

$35.00 - $139.00

All Ages

Share With Friends

Share
Tweet

Union Stage Presents:
Hot Water Music - 30th Anniversary Tour

  • Hot Water Music

    Hot Water Music

    Alternative Rock

    Hot Water Music Celebrates 30 Years of Music with an Epic Anniversary Tour + 10th Studio LP

    Hot Water Music, the legendary punk rock band hailing from Gainesville, Florida, is thrilled to announce their momentous 30-year anniversary and an electrifying anniversary tour to mark this incredible milestone.

    This three-decade celebration promises to be a landmark event for both the band and their devoted fanbase. With sets showcasing songs from all eras of their 30-year history, along with songs from their yet to be released 10th album, these shows will be unforgettable.

    From the band-- “We are humbled and thrilled to have reached this incredible milestone of 30 years together. Our fans have been with us through thick and thin, and this tour is our way of saying thank you for all the love and support over the years. We can’t wait to celebrate with you all!”

  • Quicksand

    Quicksand

    Alternative Rock

    One of the most remarkable aspects of Distant Populations—Quicksand’s first album since 2017’s Interiors—is how timely and prescient the themes running throughout its songs sound at this very moment. Thoughtful, driving, and powerful, like the long-lived band itself, the 11 tracks comprising Distant Populations have an emotional resonance that is only amplified by the events of the past stressed-out, locked-down year.

    If there is a recurring theme running throughout the new album, it might be this: “Everyone is on the one hand so connected with each other,” says Schreifels, “and on the other hand is so far apart, and so freaked out about everything.”

    That seeming contradiction may lie at the heart of what Distant Populations is all about. The title comes from a lyric from anarcho-crust punk band Nausea’s “Fallout (Of Our Being)” about “destitute populations”; because of the singer’s thick accent, Schreifels misheard it as “distant populations” and instantly connected with that concept.  “So we’re checking out each other’s social media and we know what everybody’s doing,” he says, pointing out a sad irony. “But when we’re sitting in the same room together, we’re looking at our phones.”

    That peculiar duality—our simultaneous existence in individual relationships and as part of mass society—is examined with power and surprising emotional impact throughout all of the tracks here.  Cutting and sharp lyrical passages pop out on tracks such as the throbbing “Colossus”:   “A new life/ We’re never meant to feel completed/As long as we’re here/It doesn’t matter what for”  And alienation—from whom or what often going unsaid—and loneliness are touched on regularly, whether subtly (“Sometimes it’s better just to keep on traveling” from “Phase 90”) or stated plainly (“Living just around the corner/Share the same existence/Doesn’t make a difference/Deconstructed, isolated” from the closing track “Rodan”). Combine those sentiments with the most sweeping, powerful music the band has ever created, and you’ve got a truly unforgettable, extremely timely listening experience.

    Distant Populations, just the fourth full-length album of Quicksand’s career, comes as a comparatively swift follow-up to Interiors--which itself came a full 22 years after its predecessor, 1995’s Manic Compression. Critically lauded and deemed very much worth the wait, Interiors succeeded in reestablishing the band as the powerful and contemporary entity they had always been. “Our only conscious challenge for that period, really,” says bassist Sergio Vega, “was that we felt like we needed to make a record that was worth waiting that long for.” Its success proved that they met that challenge, and, he adds, “galvanized by that, we felt like we know what we are today. We know what fits in our template. And we can build off that and expand on that.”

    And expand they did. Distant Populations has a punchier, more up-tempo sound than its predecessor; its 11 songs are concise, carved sonic jewels boasting not a single wasted note; and its raw power, its gripping lyricism, leaps out from the very first listening.  It is a striking step up for the band.

    The songwriting itself had been no minor process: Following the release of Interiors, the band successfully toured around the world, hitting the US, Europe, Japan, and South America, and in the process fully re-established their chemistry together. Looking forward to making the next album, the three of them—Schreifels, Vega, and drummer Alan Cage—had methodically recorded various soundchecks, improvisations, and show rehearsals, and compiled the results. “Eventually, when it came time to make a record,” Schreifels says, “we would just edit down to the ones that were most exciting to us all, and then refocus on them and see if we could recapture the magic from it.”

    Greatly aiding in the process was producer Will Yip, whose masterful work on Interiors had been much appreciated by the band.

    “Will has a very organized, systematic mindset,” says Schreifels, “but with that, the perfect complement of that is that he is very open-minded and giving. He's like super down for whatever you want to pursue, and not begrudgingly. And he’s also a great musician. So everyone within our little organization respects his opinion musically, and especially with the three of us, having that extra opinion that we all respect is really helpful.”

    The artfulness at work on Distant Populations is evident from its pounding opening track, “Inversion,” which may encapsulate all that is distinctive about Quicksand’s current music. The lyrics work on a variety of levels, for which Vega credits the “meticulousness” of Schreifels’ lyric writing. “They’re so open to interpretation, and they kind of hit you on a lot of levels,” he says. “I like those kind of lyrics best.”

    And, like the lyrics, the music itself pounds.

    “That was one of the last songs we came up with,” says Schreifels. “And it was just very primal sounding and very basic, you know, just like two parts. Especially in contrast to Interiors or even our earlier work, you know, where we would tend toward the more complex, I think. I thought it was really cool that we were in a place where we could step back from that, and didn't have to bells-and-whistles it all out. We kind of did something pretty basic. And I think the lyrics set the tone nicely for the record.”

    Another personal favorite of Schreifels’ here is “Missile Command,” a song that, significantly, emerged from a rehearsal jam, he recalls. “It really kind of focuses on Sergio’s whole motif in a very simple way. He and Alan just have this really kind of trademark groove, and I think that really sings on that one to me. I just felt like it's a kind of song that is very us, but we hadn't written it yet. So I'm really proud of that one.”

    There are a total of 11 tracks on Distant Populations, and not one hits the four-minute mark. But you wouldn’t know it. The album is deep, brimming with substance, and thematically about as contemporary as it gets.

    “Sonically, I think this album has a real urgency,” says Vega. “Something in the way that it was mixed. Partly it's the mix that increased the urgency. But when I look at the song tracking, a lot of songs are under three minutes, right? And that creates a real sense of urgency as well.”

    Appropriately, the urgency Vega speaks of reaches its crescendo in Distant Populations’ final track, “Rodan.” A throbbing, monolithic piece much in keeping with the album’s overall emotional landscape—and it is a gripping album closer—the track takes its name from the flying monster of late ’50s Japanese horror film fame.

    “If you watch the news right now, it's essentially a whole bunch of things that are going to scare the crap out of you,” says Schreifels. “And that's the point of it. You know what I mean? Until they think of the new thing that's going to scare the crap out of you. If Rodan beats his wings, you know, houses fall down and people die and get all crushed--but Rodan might have just saved you from some other shittier monster that’s really trying to do you harm.

    “So it’s trying to capture that feeling that I was feeling--not only in the macro of our modern time, that we live in right now, but also how it plays itself in your own lived experience, and how you're affected by it in different ways, you know? And those were the feelings and concepts that were driving me--without wanting to be polemic about it, or getting into the nitty-gritty of, well, ‘Fuck Donald Trump.’ You know what I mean? These kind of issues. There's a lot of people’s lives are being driven by these fears and, you know, I'm no exception.”

    There may be a final irony in the title of Distant Populations. Practically speaking, that’s precisely whom Quicksand recorded it for: Listeners very far away. Not a single one of these songs has ever been played live onstage. The band has dates on hold for the fall, notes Schreifels, and fingers are crossed Quicksand will be out there performing very soon.  They will likely be the most memorable shows of the band’s career.

    “Meanwhile,” he adds, “we're happy at this stage of the game.  We're excited for this record. And we want people to know.”

  • Off With Their Heads

    Off With Their Heads

    Punk

    Everything's deceiving

    DIY is a term now too pretentious and deliberately dripped like slobber from the mouths of PR writers to be taken seriously and probably isn’t the exact term I’m looking for to describe a band on Epitaph Records, but it’s close. Off With Their Heads, who started in 2002 in Minneapolis, have become an all-encompassing enterprise, partly out of the relentless drive which pushes Ryan Young and in turn OWTH forward, and partly; it’s just that thing with the music industry (or any industry) where if you’ve been in it long enough you realize if you want something done right (or the way you want it) you have to do it yourself. Classifying them as DIY works for Off With Their Heads - they make their own merch, run their own online store, book their own tours, and put out their own records; but I prefer a different term - which is a rare and deserved compliment. To me, Off With Their Heads are “a band’s band”. They do what they want the way they want to do it and without some weird air or attitude like it’s a thing to be commended for. Their mission is honest in its cynicism and that makes them stand out in an industry full of bands and brands and people pretending so hard to not care.

    Since 2002 Off With Their Heads have released 7 LPs and a litany of lineup changes. Ryan Young is the only thread weaved across all releases. They have toured. They’ve broken up. They’ve gone on hiatus and then toured more. Their latest LP ‘Calm/Collected’ is a reimagined collection of previous songs released by Young’s label, Anxious and Angry. 

    Now based in Chicago, OWTH has had a somewhat stable lineup featuring Kyle Manning on drums. Together the duo toured across America as the world opened back up, before recruiting Kevin Rotter on bass to support the 10-year anniversary of the beloved record “Home” all across North America and the UK  through 2023. The band is Kyle and Ryan but they act within a collective of other musicians who keep things fresh and interesting. OWTH have grown a wide and ambitious fanbase due mostly to Young’s wit and lyrics. Often pinned as a ‘punk band’, Young’s reach exceeds any specific genera. His influences are stretched and varied and in some ways unpredictable. OWTH have been cornered into a genera they painted themselves into, but that’s not wholly who they are. They are a band’s band, pushed forward by a remarkable drive that most musicians I know wish they had - and enough experience to know if they want something done right they better do it themselves.    

    - Andrew Thomson / Single Mothers / The Drew Thomson Foundation

Please correct the information below.

Select ticket quantity.

Complete the security check.

Select Tickets

limit 6 per person
General Admission

First come, first served standing section in front of the stage.

$35.00
Premier Balcony Row Seat

First come, first served seating at the front of the balcony.

$60.00
Balcony Bar Seat

First come, first served bar seating at the back of the balcony.

$60.00
Premier Balcony Booth for 4

Booths are preassigned and your party will be directed to your booth at arrival. You must buy the entire booth and the price listed is per seat.Booths are preassigned. Venue staff will assist you with finding your seats. You must buy the entire booth

$60.00
Premier Balcony Booth for 6

Booths are preassigned. Venue staff will assist you with finding your seats. You must buy the entire booth and the price listed is per seat.

$60.00
Hot Water Music 30th Anniversary Package

Includes 1 GA ticket, early entry, 2 song preshow acoustic performance, autographed set list, limited edition enamel pin, die struck HWM bottle opener keychain, specially designed tote bag, commemorative laminate & priority merch shopping. Ltd avail.

$139.00

Delivery Method

ticketFast
Union Stage Presents:

Hot Water Music - 30th Anniversary Tour

Mon May 13 2024 8:00 PM

(Doors 7:00 PM)

Howard Theatre Washington D.C. DC
Hot Water Music - 30th Anniversary Tour

$35.00 - $139.00 All Ages

Please correct the information below.

Select ticket quantity.

Complete the security check.

Select Tickets

All Ages
limit 6 per person
General Admission info
First come, first served standing section in front of the stage.
$35.00
Premier Balcony Row Seat info
First come, first served seating at the front of the balcony.
$60.00
Balcony Bar Seat info
First come, first served bar seating at the back of the balcony.
$60.00
Premier Balcony Booth for 4 info
Booths are preassigned and your party will be directed to your booth at arrival. You must buy the entire booth and the price listed is per seat.Booths are preassigned. Venue staff will assist you with finding your seats. You must buy the entire booth
$60.00
Premier Balcony Booth for 6 info
Booths are preassigned. Venue staff will assist you with finding your seats. You must buy the entire booth and the price listed is per seat.
$60.00
Hot Water Music 30th Anniversary Package info
Includes 1 GA ticket, early entry, 2 song preshow acoustic performance, autographed set list, limited edition enamel pin, die struck HWM bottle opener keychain, specially designed tote bag, commemorative laminate & priority merch shopping. Ltd avail.
$139.00

Delivery Method

ticketFast