Friday Music Fest Pass

Fri May 5 2017

8:00 PM - 11:55 PM (Doors 7:00 PM)

Uptown Theater

3700 Broadway Rd Kansas City, MO 64111

All Ages

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All patrons must have a ticket which is redeemed for fest wristband regardless of age. Tickets and Wristbands are good for the dates specified only at all Venues on specified date

VIP Ticket is good for first five rows in the balcony or access to front of stage area at Uptown Theater with guaranteed entry

A photo I.D. is required for Will-Call

No Refunds, rain checks or exchanges. Tickets are only good for the dates specified only

Admission to the Music fest is first-come, first-served. The goal of the festival is to bring quality entertainment to Kansas City. If there is a certain band that you want to see be sure to get there early. Your pass only gains you access to the venues and does not guarantee the ability to see every show. Each venue is limited to the capacity. We will not oversell the availability of the venues so there should always be something that you should have access to.

Re-entry procedure. You can exit and re-enter the venues with wristband, however if venue is at capacity re-entry is not possible.

Friday Music Fest Pass

  • Sorry, you missed this event.
  • Check out other similar events on TicketWeb.
  • Jason Isbell

    Jason Isbell

    Alternative Roots

    Every once in a while, and not that often, a popular musician comes along whose work is both profoundly personal and evocative of the larger moment, merging the specifics of lived experience in a particular time and place to the realities of our shared journey as a community, a people. The work of such artists as Bob Dylan, Neil Young, Bruce Springsteen, and Kurt Cobain – and now Jason Isbell, I would argue, with his new album Something More Than Free – spreads irresistibly outward from the soul, that private well of vision and emotion, into the broader realm of cultural history, sharpening our ability to see, expanding our ability to feel, and restoring our sense that we belong not only to ourselves but to an extended spiritual family. The songs create a space to be together, and closer together than we were before.

    To fans and the music press, the personal story surrounding Isbell's last, breakthrough album, Southeastern, is widely known and easily reprised. A troubled young troubadour, newly married, stepped away from the darkness of addiction into a new, uncertain life of clarity and commitment, reflecting ruefully on his hard won victories and the price he paid attaining them. It was an album of aching elegance, marked by the sort of lyrical precision that brought to mind certain literary masters of the melancholy American scene, from Flannery O'Connor to Raymond Carver. By avoiding the hairy-chested bombast of arena country music while crafting music with solid melodic contours Isbell created an album, and a sound, of memorably infectious empathy.

    With Something More Than Free, he stretches himself further, greatly expanding the boundaries of Isbell country, that territory of the heart and mind where people strive against their imperfections, and simultaneously against their circumstances, in a landscape that's often unfriendly to their hopes. As always, he starts with the subjects he knows best: the dignity of work, the difficulty of love, the friction between the present and the past. "I found myself going back," he says, explaining the direction he chose to take, "to family and close personal relations." The opening cut, "It Takes a Lifetime", so loose and summery and optimistic, invites us into this circle of kindred souls, instantly making us feel at home. And while Isbell may be singing about himself or someone else whose inner life he's privy to when he mentions fighting 'the urge to live inside my telephone,' isn't that everyone's challenge nowadays?

    Once you've cleaned up your act, what should your next action be, and your next? That's one of the questions handled in "24 Frames", the album's bracing second cut, whose narrator seems to be managing life deliberately, step by step, with peril all around. "You thought God was an architect. Now you know/ He's something like a pipe bomb ready to blow." The danger of self-destruction is always near, and the way to defeat it seems to be putting self-seeking and vanity aside and taking the next right action, however simple. "After you've looked your fears in the eye," Isbell tells me on the phone, "What's important now?" Maybe he knows and maybe he's still learning – this isn't an album of easy certainties – but what makes his songwriting so rich and gripping, besides its observational precision, is the honesty of his inquiries. He doesn't flinch. He doesn't cheat.

    The album – and it is an album, a unified musical document, not a grab bag of would-be singles ("I don't write songs to be played at sporting events," Isbell cracks) – relaxes and deepens as it goes along, offering some of the pleasures of a fine novel, including a collection of sharp vignettes that stick in the mind, impossible to shake. "Flagship", a spare and haunting meditation on the fragility of long-term love, ranges around a faded, old hotel for images of passion that has cooled. "The lights down in the lobby, they don't shine/ They just flicker while the elevator whines." "Children of Children", a masterful creation that floods the ears with bold and rolling soundscapes reminiscent of CSNY, finds the singer examining old family photos and dwelling on his own unwitting influence on his mother's interrupted youth. "I was riding on my mother's hip/she was shorter than the corn. And all the years you took from her/just by being born." That last line is as devastating as they come, a thought that, once voiced, can't be forgotten – and that we're surprised wasn't voiced before. Isbell's songwriting is like that, at its most poetic when it's most plainspoken. His lines and his lyrics fall into place like the tumblers of a lock.

    The title track, which he tells me on the phone was inspired by his father -- a hard-working man who won't let up -- is more than a tribute to a beloved parent; it speaks to the outlook of a generation that has seen, in Isbell's words, "The American dream go from the light at the end of a tunnel to all tunnel." As usual, Isbell travels outward from the specific case to a more comprehensive human perspective. "I start with an individual, he says, "and then I try to write for everybody." The song nails its subject from the moment it begins. "When I get home from work, I'll call up all my friends/ and we'll bust up something beautiful we'll have to build again." The man in question, a born provider who finds himself on Sunday "too tired to go to church," is politically conscious of his situation ("The hammer needs the nail, and the poor man's up for sale") but grateful for what he's able to bring home. In this, he's like Isbell, who told me that in his writing he tries "to be angry without being bitter and emotional without being maudlin." He probably doesn't have to try too hard. For all the darkness that leaks into his songs (only because it exists out in the world) Isbell's fundamental orientation is still toward the light, even when it's fast receding. His humanity has an almost uncanny feel, as though he's lived three lives for everybody else's one. He believes in the basic power of his vocation as a writer, singer, player, and artist to conjure wholeness from a world of fragments. He's the musician we need now, and whom we've waited for: candid, vulnerable, outraged, literate, and just romantic enough to carry on in a period of rising disenchantment. His time has come, and so has ours. Listening to Isbell we also hear ourselves.

  • Strand of Oaks

    Strand of Oaks

    Indie Rock

    In 2003, Tim Showalter’s house burned down, his fiancée left him, and he resorted to writing songs on an acoustic guitar while living on park benches in suburban Philadelphia. Those events informed the entirety of his arresting debut, Leave Ruin , an album about loss and brokenness and lack of faith. But as affecting as it was, Showalter is leery of being stuck in the past. After all, the first word of that record’s title is “leave,” and one of the first thing he asks when contacted for this interview is, “Can we kind of re-do my bio? I don’t want to keep being the sad sack whose house burned down.” 

    These days, Showalter is happily married and comfortably settled in Philadelphia, and he’s staring down the release of his second record, Pope Killdragon, an album that’s even stranger and more singular. Where Ruin was stark and autobiographical, Killdragon — which features odd, laser-beam synthesizers and one bona fide stoner metal track — is wild and fantastical. Showalter either invents characters whole cloth, or takes an approach to history so liberal even Tarantino would give pause (John F. Kennedy authors a fable about a knight; Dan Aykroyd carries out a revenge killing for the death of John Belushi). It’s a bold, eerie, mighty work — though the man responsible for it couldn’t be more affable or good natured.~ last.fm

  • Run River North

    Run River North

    Pop

    On February 26, LA-based Run River North will release Drinking From A Salt Pond, the follow up LP to their 2014 self-titled debut.  Working with producer Lars Stalfors (Cold War Kids, Deap Vally, HEALTH, Matt and Kim), the band leave behind its familiar folksy roots to craft an ambitious rock album.  During the writing of Drinking From A Salt Pond, the band admits to flaring tempers and tense operations as they worked to redefine their sound, goals and relationships. Embracing their natural growth, Run River North lean on each other and learn to trust themselves along the way in order to make something brutally honest, lasting and truly beautiful. Produced by Phil Ek (Built To Spill, The Shins, Father John Misty), the debut album landed at #3 on the Billboard Heatseekers chart. With heaps of praise from fans and critics alike, NPR writes, “Run River North stays the course – and finds success,” and Esquire hails, “because modern folk this richly layered has a high degree of difficulty…and [Run River North] nail the landing.” With a nearly sold-out debut North American headline tour, the band has performed on Jimmy Kimmel Live!, VH-1 “Big Morning Buzz,” CMT “Concrete Country,” Last Call With Carson Daly, and Emmy-winning PBS series Artbound.  All this follows features with The Wall Street Journal, NPR Weekend Edition, NPR Here & Now, Entertainment Weekly, American Songwriter, Daytrotter, American Way, KPCC 89.3 and TeamCoco, the official website of Conan. Run River North is Alex Hwang (lead vocals, guitars), Daniel Chae (vocals, strings), Jennifer Rim (strings), Joe Chun (bass, vocals), John Chong (drums, vocals) and Sally Kang (vocals, keyboards).

  • Cobi

    Cobi

    Indie Pop

Friday Music Fest Pass

Fri May 5 2017 8:00 PM - 11:55 PM

(Doors 7:00 PM)

Uptown Theater Kansas City MO
Friday Music Fest Pass
  • Sorry, you missed this event.
  • Check out other similar events on TicketWeb.

All Ages

All patrons must have a ticket which is redeemed for fest wristband regardless of age. Tickets and Wristbands are good for the dates specified only at all Venues on specified date

VIP Ticket is good for first five rows in the balcony or access to front of stage area at Uptown Theater with guaranteed entry

A photo I.D. is required for Will-Call

No Refunds, rain checks or exchanges. Tickets are only good for the dates specified only

Admission to the Music fest is first-come, first-served. The goal of the festival is to bring quality entertainment to Kansas City. If there is a certain band that you want to see be sure to get there early. Your pass only gains you access to the venues and does not guarantee the ability to see every show. Each venue is limited to the capacity. We will not oversell the availability of the venues so there should always be something that you should have access to.

Re-entry procedure. You can exit and re-enter the venues with wristband, however if venue is at capacity re-entry is not possible.