Failure / Swervedriver

Sun Mar 17 2019

8:00 PM (Doors 7:00 PM)

The Basement East

917 Woodland St Nashville, TN 37206

$29.50 ADV / $33 DOS

Ages 21+

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Presale: Thursday, January 31st  10am
On-sale: Saturday, Feb 2nd @ 10am

Failure / Swervedriver

  • Failure

    Failure

    Progressive Rock

    FAILURE HEADQUARTERS, Calif., -- Failure release In The Future on March 30, marking the Los Angeles trio’s first new music since the 2015 album, The Heart Is A Monster.

    The self-released, four-song EP is the first of four new releases planned for the next year: three EPs culminating in the release of a full-length album this fall. The full-length release will be available both digitally and physically.

    “Living inside a screen seems like absolute freedom sometimes, but It’s more like a kind of psychic decapitation,” explains Greg Edwards. “We have made aliens of our bodies. We exist in an era where the most primitive structures in our brains are being rewarded and controlled, almost constantly, by extremely sophisticated, interconnected, and self-perpetuating technologies. There seems to be no imaginable way, or real desire, to moderate this. Artificial Intelligence may be creating itself right beneath our noses and using our bodies as unaware hosts. Everything is talking to everything else but there’s no communication anymore. Only divisions and their promotion. The surrogate reality of the internet sucks us out of our own bodies and puts us in a space where we can imagine we have less and less resemblance to the creatures we actually are. The forthcoming three eps and full-length album, explore the ambivalence inspired by this dislocation.”

    Pre-orders for the full series of releases are available at failurebandmerch.com. Special offerings and pre-sale bundles are available via pledgemusic.com/projects/failure-lp5.

    In the Future tracklist:​​​​​​​

    Dark Speed
    Paralytic Flow
    Pennies
    Segue 10
    The EP was produced by Failure and mixed by Ken Andrews.

    The band’s fourth album, The Heart Is A Monster, arrived in June 2015. The 18-track collection was hailed by fans and critics alike for “brilliantly picking up from where Fantastic Planet left off” (Rolling Stone) and serving as “a stark reminder of why the band have been so influential but it also underscores their status as modern trailblazers” (Alternative Press). Pitchfork dubbed it “a thrilling ride” while Entertainment Weekly described the album as “a jaw-dropping slab of throbbing, fuzzy, visceral space rock.”
  • Swervedriver

    Swervedriver

    Alternative Rock

    Adam Franklin (guitar, vocals)

    Jimmy Hartridge (guitar)

    Mikey Jones (drums)

    Mick Quinn (bass)

     

    “Space travel rock’n’roll” – that’s how the band initially self-identified their sound. This was back in the 1990s, before the aspirational dreams of the computer age collided with reality. Across the four-album arc of their first era – Raise (1991); Mezcal Head (1993); Ejector Seat Reservation (1995); 99th Dream (1997) – Swervedriver made music that was all about the journey: songs called For Seeking Heat, Planes Over The Skyline, Juggernaut Rides, 93 Million Miles From The Sun And Counting. Swervedriver simulated the thrill of propulsion, the euphoric arrival, the anticipation of going back again (or not)… of moving on.

        And move on they did. During 10 years in absentia, the band’s legend grew. Sages spoke mistily of these four desert rock horsemen of the apocalypse who came from Oxford and were shunned as exiles in their own land. In 2005, a two-disc anthology was compiled with the band’s involvement, and foretold a resurrection. Sure enough, the trip resumed in 2008, with Swervedriver encountering the acclaim they ought to have enjoyed a decade earlier. A fifth album, I Wasn’t Born To Lose You, emerged in 2015, a mere 17 years after its predecessor, and trumpeted some eternal Swervedriver virtues: the intricate, fissile guitar patterns of Adam Franklin and Jimmy Hartridge, baked hard then dispatched in giant monolithic waves by a tactile rhythm section including drummer Mikey Jones. As the opening song Autodidact had it: “Holy fuel forever spilled”.

        So much for the resurrection, now for the reckoning. The new Swervedriver album is titled Future Ruins, a two-word précis of its dread thrills. It opens with Mary Winter, a song narrated by a recognisable Swervedriver archetype: a traveler, hurtling away from this world. “Planet Earth long gone/And my feet won’t touch the ground.” But where is the traveler headed? And why? The second song, The Lonely Crowd Fades In The Air, offers some possible answers: “We’ve stumbled into the end of days/Where the future comes home to cry…”

        “There’s a lot of foreboding with regard to the future on this album,” agrees Adam Franklin. “Space is in there a lot too. In the first song, the character is a spaceman who’s trying to remember what life is really like. Also, it could be about somewhere in the world where winter isn’t like the winter here. A sunny place, but its December or January and you’re trying to remember winter. Something’s going on.”

        That something began in October 2017, with a two-week stint of tracking at MAKE Records Studio in Los Angeles. Having made I Wasn’t Born To Lose You hard on the heels of an Australian tour, the band decided to repeat the process and bottle the momentum of a just-completed US tour performing both Raise and Mezcal Head in their entirety. “That’s a good way to record,” says Adam, “because you’ve literally just seen the whites of the audience’s eyes and you’re thinking, ‘If that audience from last night were here now…’ You can’t get too mellow. We came home with 30 different songs.”

        Stoking the creative energies was engineer TJ Doherty. A Grammy winner for his work on Wilco’s A Ghost Is Born, his diverse credit list also includes Lou Reed and Steely Dan, Stephen Malkmus and Joanna Newsom, Sonic Youth and Selfish Cunt. But the band knew him in a previous life, from their first decade of existence. “He was a fan,” says Adam. “We first met because he was down the front at all the gigs in New York and New Jersey a long lost time ago. He ended up going to engineering school and worked on all these cool records.”

        The final 10 tracks were then mixed in spring 2018, as the band toured Europe – again, infusing the recordings with road-slick fumes. Future Ruins exhibits Swervedriver’s fabled widescreen escapism, but with a tension that echoes a sleeve image of Coney Island in skeletal monochrome, like a post mortem photograph of a failed utopia. The title song offers a grim assessment of humanity’s current condition: “We are ruled by fools/These are future ruins/That the king is insane/Is now old news.”

        “That was an early lyric, I sang that one in LA, one of about three or four that I sang there,” notes Adam. “It just came out. A rage at the state of the world.”

        There’s more where that came from. Drone Lover, a song that predates the last album, is a comment on the depersonalised nature of 21st century techno-warfare. For all its melody’s humming mood elevation, The Lonely Crowd Fades In The Air feels like an elegy, with one crushing couplet after another: “Choose your colours wisely/Because things ain’t the same as in days gone by.” That song’s title – “it has a resonance that fits with these times,” says Adam – evokes the alienation wrought by the mass embrace of so-called ‘social’ media; a perspective on our contemporary malaise that’s also echoed in Everybody’s Going Somewhere And No-One’s Going Anywhere, a spoken word dreamscape.

        “Everybody’s got the same amount of time on the planet,” explains Adam. “There might be a couple in Italy, 90 years old, they’ve been married for 70, they’ve never left the country, and they might possibly have had a better life than the person running around who gets a heart attack at 40 after earning 2 million dollars.”

         The trip ends with Radio-Silent’s ghostly seven-minute afterburn, its lyric comprising just 26 words: “We’re all so alone/And we all have to live as one/And we all must exist as one/And we all must resist as one.” The track ends with police sirens and an electronic snap. “It’s loud, but it’s impotent rage,” says Adam. “Everything is completely fucked up. There’s no coming back from that one.”

        So the journey’s over, and yet Swervedriver ride on. Just as there was never any thought of I Wasn’t Born To Lose You being a last hurrah for old time’s sake, Future Ruins presents a band moving with real time/real life vitality. It showcases new tricks and classic hallmarks: pop songs which don’t have choruses, like Mary Winter; odd arrangements and weird contrasts, like Spiked Flower’s rock’n’roll grind breaking out to acknowledge English landscape painter John Constable; and a lyric that references Echo & The Bunnymen. See if you can spot that one…

        So space travel rock’n’roll: it still applies.

        “Sometimes I think we’re deceptively complicated, which is better than being the other way around!” Adam laughs. “I love being back in this band. We’re playing places that we’ve either not played in a long time, or new places like Singapore, where there were 20 year old kids there and they’re singing the words to the *new songs… We don’t want to be the band that just plays the old albums. We’re glad to have a whole bunch of new songs. We’re on it again.”

     

    Written by Keith Cameron, October 2018

        

            

        

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We do not accept tickets from 3rd party sites.
BACKPACKS are not allowed inside the venue.
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Handicap accommodations can be arranged.

ALL 18 AND OVER SHOWS ARE NO RE-ENTRY. If you leave the venue, you will not be allowed back in. Thanks!

Failure / Swervedriver

Sun Mar 17 2019 8:00 PM

(Doors 7:00 PM)

The Basement East Nashville TN
Failure / Swervedriver

$29.50 ADV / $33 DOS Ages 21+

Presale: Thursday, January 31st  10am
On-sale: Saturday, Feb 2nd @ 10am

Please correct the information below.

Select ticket quantity.

Complete the security check.

Select Tickets

Ages 21+
limit 4 per person
G.A.
$29.50

Delivery Method

ticketFast
Mail
UPS
Will Call

Terms & Conditions

This event is 21 and over. Any Ticket holder unable to present valid identification indicating that they are at least 21 years of age will not be admitted to this event, and will not be eligible for a refund.

No Backpacks allowed in the venue.
ALL PATRONS MUST BRING A VALID FORM OF IDENTIFICATION.
The name on your ID must match the name on your ticket.
We do not accept tickets from 3rd party sites.
BACKPACKS are not allowed inside the venue.
Most shows are standing room only.
Handicap accommodations can be arranged.

ALL 18 AND OVER SHOWS ARE NO RE-ENTRY. If you leave the venue, you will not be allowed back in. Thanks!