Dirty Honey & Mammoth WVH

Tue Feb 8 2022

7:30 PM (Doors 6:00 PM)

Marathon Music Works

1402 Clinton St Nashville, TN 37203

$29.00

All Ages

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Public Onsale: Friday, November 5th @ 10am CST
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This show currently has no COVID safety requirements for attendees. This is subject to change. If this changes we will be sure to update this page as well as notify all ticket buyers via email.

102.9 The Buzz Presents - Young Guns Tour
Dirty Honey & Mammoth WVH

  • Dirty Honey

    Dirty Honey

    Arena Rock

    Some musicians take a while to build an audience and connect with fans. For the Los Angeles-based quartet Dirty Honey, success came right out of the gate.  Released in March 2019, the band's debut single, "When I’m Gone," became the first song by an unsigned artist to reach No. 1 on Billboard's Mainstream Rock chart. Their second single, "Rolling 7s," went into the Top 5 and was still headed up when COVID changed everything.  That same year, Dirty Honey opened for The Who, Guns ’N Roses, Slash, and Alter Bridge and was the "do-not-miss-band" at major rock festivals such as Welcome to Rockville, Rocklahoma, Louder Than Life, Heavy MTL, and Epicenter.  On its first U.S. headline tour in January and February 2020, the band sold out every date.

    When it came time to record its self-titled full-length debut album, the band—vocalist Marc LaBelle, guitarist John Notto, bassist Justin Smolian, and drummer Corey Coverstone—wasn't about to mess with what was already working. Teaming up with producer Nick DiDia (Rage Against the Machine, Pearl Jam), who also produced the band's 2019 self-titled EP, Dirty Honey again captured the lightning-in-a-bottle dynamics and energy of their live sound.

    "As a guitarist, I'm always inspired by the everlasting pursuit of the perfect riff," says Notto. "I also wanted to extend the artistic statement that we had already made. We weren't looking to sound different, or prove our growth, necessarily. It was more about, 'Oh, you thought that was good? Hold my beer.'"

    "Because of the pandemic,” added drummer Coverstone, “we had a lot more time to write and prepare, which was great.  It meant that we were able to workshop the songs a lot more, and I think it really made a difference."

    Dirty Honey's album indeed builds on the band's output to date, with airtight songwriting that plays up their strengths:  sexy, bluesy, nasty rock'n'roll, melodic hard rock, and soulful 70s blues-rock.  On "The Wire," LaBelle reaffirms his status as one of contemporary rock’s best vocalists, while “Another Last Time” is a raunchy, timeless ballad about a toxic relationship that you just can’t stop saying goodbye to.  “Tied Up” and the album’s lead single “California Dreamin,’’ both feature smoking guitar solos bookended by massive riffs and hooks.

     “‘California Dreaming’ was the last song we wrote,” said bassist Justin Smolian.  “We finished it about two weeks before we recorded it, so the song was still so new, and we were trying out different things, so every take was a little different.  But there was that one where we just captured it, and it was magic."

    Although each band member started playing music as kids—at the age of eight, Notto's parents even bought him a red-and-white Stratocaster—each one brings eclectic influences to Dirty Honey's sound.  For example, drummer Coverstone has studied with jazz and L.A. session drummers but loves heavy metal; Notto grew up listening to ’70s funk and R&B as well as rock 'n' roll, and bassist Smolian has a bachelor of music in classical guitar and loves Tom Petty and The Beach Boys. 

    LaBelle meanwhile, takes cues from his songwriting idols (to name a few, Robert Plant, Steven Tyler, Mick Jagger, Chris Robinson, and the late Chris Cornell) when coming up with lyrics. As a result, the songs on the Dirty Honey album hint at life's ebbs and flows—shattering heartbreak, romantic connection, intense soul-searching—while giving listeners space to draw their own conclusions.  

    "Sometimes, if you just let lyrics pass behind your ears, they sound like cool shit is being said," LaBelle says. "And then once you dive in, you realize, 'Oh, that's really thoughtful.' But it still doesn't have a meaning that's easy to pinpoint. There's an overarching idea that is really cool, but it's not necessarily on-the-nose."

    Although the Dirty Honey album may sound effortless, its genesis had a bumpy start. The day before the band members were due to fly to Australia to track the album, Los Angeles entered lockdown due to the COVID-19 pandemic, and traveling was off the table. However, Dirty Honey was still eager to work with DiDia, so they devised a Plan B: recording the full-length in a Los Angeles studio with one of DiDia's long-time engineers, and the producer beamed into the proceedings via the magic of modern technology.

    "He was able to listen to what we were laying down in real-time, through this app," says LaBelle. It was like he was in the room with us. It was surprisingly seamless the way it all went down."

    Having to switch gears delayed the start of recording slightly, although this extra time ended up being a boon. Dirty Honey rented a rehearsal space and demoed the album's songs in advance, meaning the tracks were in good shape when DiDia came onboard. Notto mixed and recorded these workshopped tracks himself, which helped him rediscover one of Dirty Honey's biggest strengths: being well-rehearsed while not over polishing their work.

    "I've learned just a little bit more about what people might mean when they say, magic—you know, 'This one has the magic,'" he says. "We would do two and three different demos of a song, so there would be a few versions. On a few occasions, the version that people kept going back to was the sloppiest, if you look at it from a performance standpoint."

    LaBelle agrees. "It's just about getting the performance right and not thinking about it too much. I never like to be perfect in the studio. None of the stuff that I really liked as a kid was. I don't really see myself getting away from that too much in the future just because I think you lose the soul if you do it too many times, if it's too perfect."

    Notto also admits that the creative process isn't necessarily always all fun and games. But for him and the rest of Dirty Honey, pushing through those tough times and coming out stronger on the other side is worth it. "When you finally come through on those moments, that's where the real magic comes in," he says. "What makes all of our songs fun to play and listen to is we don't allow ourselves to stop short of getting the best possible results out of each one of them."

  • Mammoth WVH

    Mammoth WVH

    Alternative Rock

    First impressions last a lifetime. Wolfgang Van Halen has prepared a lifetime to make his first impression. The songwriter, vocalist, and multi-instrumentalist worked tirelessly towards the introduction of MAMMOTH [Explorer1], his self-titled 2021 debut album. Playing every instrument and singing each and every note, his music presents a personal and powerful perspective, balancing memorable hooks and tight technicality. As many times as audiences have experienced his talent alongside the likes of Tremonti, Clint Lowery, and of course, Van Halen, they meet Wolf as an individual for the very first time now.

    “You only have one chance to make a first impression, and I wanted to do so to the best of my abilities,” he affirms. “Throughout the whole process, I was finding who I am musically and by the end, I got a pretty good handle on a sound I can claim for myself.”

    His father often played guitar against his mother’s pregnant belly, and Wolf absorbed those vibrations from the womb. At the age of 10, his Pop gave him a drum kit for his birthday. To this day, Wolf considers himself “a drummer before anything else.” As he developed as a musician, he learned how to play guitar in order to perform “316” — which his father penned for him — at a 6th-grade talent show.

    It may come as a surprise, but outside of his father teaching him one drumbeat from an AC/DC song, Wolfgang taught himself every instrument.  “My dad wasn’t the best teacher,” he laughs. “I would ask him to play something, and then he would just proceed to be Eddie Van Halen. He would look at me and say, ‘Do that.’ to which I would laugh and sarcastically reply, ‘Sure thing, no problem.’”

    In the summer of 2006 when he was 15 years old, Wolf grabbed a bass and began noodling. While at the legendary 5150 Studios, his impromptu woodshedding inspired Eddie and Uncle Alex. Endless family jam sessions followed. By summer’s end, Wolfgang phoned David Lee Roth’s manager and by winter Roth showed up for rehearsal. They rocked “On Fire,” and “That’s how the 2007 tour began,” says Wolf.

    Not only did Wolf canvas the world with Van Halen while in high school, but he also held down the low end on 2012’s A Different Kind of Truth—which debuted at #2 on the Billboard Top 200. When not on tour with Van Halen, he cut bass for Tremonti’s critically acclaimed Cauterize [2015] and Dust [2016] in addition to joining the band on the road. In 2019, Wolf handled drums and also played bass on half of the 10 songs for Clint Lowery’s solo debut, God Bless The Renegades.

    In the midst of all this, at the beginning of 2015, Wolf broke ground on what would become MAMMOTH with producer Michael “Elvis” Baskette [Alter Bridge, Slash] behind the board. Wolf began to embrace his voice, inspired by everyone from his father, to bands like AC/DC, Foo Fighters, Nine Inch Nails, TOOL, and Jimmy Eat World. “I’ve been singing my whole life, but it wasn’t until MAMMOTH that I really found my voice. Elvis was great, and he helped me gain the confidence to become a lead vocalist.”

    “The name Mammoth is really special to me.” says Wolf. “Not only was it the name of Van Halen before it became Van Halen, but my father was also the lead singer. Ever since my dad told me this, I always thought that when I grew up, I’d call my own band Mammoth, because I loved the name so much. I’m so thankful that my father was able to listen to, and enjoy the music I made. I’m really proud of the work I’ve done and nothing made me happier than seeing how proud he was that I was continuing the family legacy.”

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limit 8 per person
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Terms & Conditions

Absolutely no refunds - no exceptions. Lineups and times are subject to change. Any ticket suspected of being purchased for the sole purpose of reselling can be canceled at the discretion of Marathon Music Works and/or Ticketweb. Valid government-issued photo ID required for entry to age-restricted events. Tickets available at the door (if not sold out). No re-entry. Physical tickets available at the box office.
102.9 The Buzz Presents - Young Guns Tour

Dirty Honey & Mammoth WVH

Tue Feb 8 2022 7:30 PM

(Doors 6:00 PM)

Marathon Music Works Nashville TN
Dirty Honey & Mammoth WVH

$29.00 All Ages

Public Onsale: Friday, November 5th @ 10am CST
--
This show currently has no COVID safety requirements for attendees. This is subject to change. If this changes we will be sure to update this page as well as notify all ticket buyers via email.

Please correct the information below.

Select ticket quantity.

Complete the security check.

Select Tickets

All Ages
limit 8 per person
Floor
General Admission - Standing Room Only
Floor - Regular
$29.00

Delivery Method

ticketFast
Will Call

Terms & Conditions

Absolutely no refunds - no exceptions. Lineups and times are subject to change. Any ticket suspected of being purchased for the sole purpose of reselling can be canceled at the discretion of Marathon Music Works and/or Ticketweb. Valid government-issued photo ID required for entry to age-restricted events. Tickets available at the door (if not sold out). No re-entry. Physical tickets available at the box office.