Dead Fingers, The Pollies, Adam Faucett

Fri May 11 2018

9:00 PM (Doors 8:30 PM)

The Basement

1604 Eighth Ave South Nashville, TN 37203

$8 ADV/ $10 DOS

Ages 21+

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Dead Fingers, The Pollies, Adam Faucett

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  • Dead Fingers

    Dead Fingers

    Country

  • The Pollies

    The Pollies

    Alternative

    “NOT HERE” IS THE NEW FULL-LENGTH LP FROM THE POLLIES, A BAND THAT HAS BEEN DEFYING GENRES AND STEPPING OVER BOUNDARIES SINCE THEIR FIRST RELEASE IN 2012. 

    It’s their first release for Florence, AL’s Single Lock Records, and it shows the band shedding their alt-country skin in favor of experimental noise and unadulterated risk. 

    "Not Here" is how I felt when I wrote the majority of the songs for this record,” lead singer and songwriter Jay Burgess says. “I was almost living parallel to myself. I’m watching myself react to what some people probably view as "normal life occurrences", but for me, someone who’s never been through these "normal life occurrences", it was very difficult.”

    Burgess is the songwriter behind The Pollies, and on “Not Here”, he hits on all the familiar topics— love, loss, triumph and regret— with an edge and ferocity that shows up on tracks like “Lost” and “Jackson”. Simply put, these are compelling stories—and Burgess has stepped into his own as a gifted storyteller.


    “Love lost is what drives the record lyrically,” Burgess says. “Some of these songs started as musical ideas—where I’d record something on my phone and then go back 3-4 times and make sense of the words—and other songs were just there without a lot of work.”

    “Lost”, the record’s lead single, started as one phrase and a host of different musical ideas.


    “It was a song that I had sitting around with unfinished and unrealized lyrics,” Burgess says. “I’d do multiple recordings of it with different lyrics. One phrase I kept coming back to was “I wish I was lost”. For weeks, that one line stayed on my notepad. Soon after that, a friend of mine found out his marriage was falling apart. I was someone for him to talk to, and after one of our conversations one night, the words for “Lost” just fell into place.”

    Another standout track, “Jackson”, came together in a much quicker fashion—with a far different focus.

    “I’ve always been into revolutions—more specifically thinking about what things would be like if they hadn’t happened,” Burgess says. “Obviously, a major movement in this country’s history was the Civil Rights movement. I think about how long that effort took and how great the risk was and it’s amazing to me. I thought I had heard all of the stories that went along with the movement until I heard the story of Jimmie Lee Jackson.”

    “At the time, there was no movie explaining him and his involvement with the Selma story. He’s pretty much the reason Dr. King came to Selma, and I found his story inspiring in many different ways. I had to write something about him, and frankly, I could’ve probably done an entire record on him.”

    The subject matter changes, but the themes remain: love, loss, triumph and regret. It’s clear that Burgess is the kind of songwriter that throws a lot of curveballs. Accompanied by a deft and accomplished band, “Not Here” is the kind of statement that signals the arrival of a great American band.

  • Adam Faucett

    Adam Faucett

    Singer-Songwriter

    Hailing from Little Rock, Arkansas, and possessing a voice that the Onion A.V. Club warns “knocks your brain into the back of your skull”, Adam Faucett has drawn comparisons from Tim Buckley to Cat Power to Otis Redding.

    Called “one of the greatest, most thoughtful lyricists the state has to offer.” (Arkansas Times) Faucett has again pushed the borders of his “part folk, part blues, part elemental rock stomp, part unidentifiable cosmic holler” (Arkansas Democrat Gazette) with the release Blind Water Finds Blind Water, a record of his most arresting and beautiful songs to date.

    Faucett began performing solo in 2006 when the demise of Russellville, AR band Taught the Rabbits pushed him toward Chicago. He returned to Arkansas in 2007 to record his first solo album The Great Basking Shark, and began touring nationally. 2008’s Show Me Magic, Show Me Out followed, featuring Faucett’s band, The Tall Grass. A relentless touring schedule has led to shows with Jason Isbell, Damien Jurado, Chuck Ragan, and Lucero.

    For the past two years, Adam has toured nationally and internationally in support of his third acclaimed release, More Like A Temple, which received praise from outlets including American Songwriter, Paste Magazine, No Depression and Uprooted Music Review. Temple also gained overseas support, landing at #14 on the EuroAmericana chart and receiving 5 stars from Altcountry.NL, bringing him to Europe for the first time.

    From the opening note of the first track of Faucett’s new release Blind Water Finds Blind Water (Last Chance Records - 2014), it becomes clear that there is no holding back on this album. The emotionally raw “Day Drinker” sets the tone for a tour of unearthly themes set against the workaday backdrops of rural and suburban Arkansas. Sublime melodies mix tensely with characters who live in unsavory and haunted spaces. A Staten Island killer, an abusive ex-husband, and the 20th century "sleeping prophet" Edgar Cayce, all make appearances. Faucett, who says he “identifies more with the flood than the victims”, explains “the tunes of Blind Water take full responsibility for the irreversible damage.”

    “Benton” and “Sparkman” reference two of the Arkansas towns where Adam spent his childhood, with the treatment of these stomping grounds blending reality and fiction to create Faucett’s own Arkansas Gothic vision. Deeply personal moments "Opossum", "Poet Song", and "Walking Home Late" are, according to Faucett, “all almost word for word true autobiographical accounts of my life in the not-so-Southern, not-so-Midwestern bastard state of mind that is Central Arkansas. This record, written on the run physically and emotionally, is a mapping of a moment guided by the whim and mercy of others. Water, blind and helpless moves not where it wants but where it’s allowed.”

Dead Fingers, The Pollies, Adam Faucett

Fri May 11 2018 9:00 PM

(Doors 8:30 PM)

The Basement Nashville TN
Dead Fingers, The Pollies, Adam Faucett
  • Sorry, you missed this event.
  • Check out other similar events on TicketWeb.

$8 ADV/ $10 DOS Ages 21+