Dark Horses feat. Adam Hood, Channing Wilson, Erik Dylan, Dave Kennedy

Sat Dec 9 2017

9:30 PM (Doors 8:30 PM)

Zydeco

2001 15th Ave. South Birmingham, AL 35205

Ages 18+

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RESERVED SECTION: Included seating at high top table with cocktail service. You must purchase 4 seats.

SEATED SECTION: First come seated chairs in the middle of the room.

GENERAL SECTION: Standing room only in the back of the room. 

Peachtree Entertainment Presents:
Dark Horses feat. Adam Hood, Channing Wilson, Erik Dylan, Dave Kennedy

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  • Adam Hood

    Adam Hood

    Nashville Sound

    Solo artist. Frontman. Behind-the-scenes songwriter. For more than a decade, Adam Hood has left his mark both onstage and in the writing room, carving out a southern sound that mixes equal parts country, soul and American roots music.

    It's a sound that began shape in Opelika, Alabama. Raised by working-class parents, Hood started playing hometown shows as a 16 year-old, landing a weekly residency at a local restaurant. He'd perform there every Friday and Saturday night, filling his set list with songs by John Hiatt, Hank Williams Jr, and Vince Gill. As the years progressed, the gigs continued — not only in his home state, but across the entire country. Eventually even landing himself a three-year nationwide tour opening for Leon Russell.

    These days, though, Hood is no longer just putting his own stamp on the songs of chart-topping country stars. Instead, many of those acts -- including Little Big Town, Miranda Lambert, Anderson East, Josh Abbott Band, Lee Ann Womack & Brent Cobb -- are playing his songs.

    In 2016, Hood signed a publishing deal with Warner/Chappell Nashville and GRAMMY Award-winning producer Dave Cobb’s Low Country Sound. All while remaining adamantly focused on his own career, playing around 100 shows annually promoting third solo release, Welcome to the Big World, and now his newest release, Somewhere in Between.

    A showcase for both his frontman abilities and songwriting chops, Somewhere in Between shines a light on Hood's strength as a live performer. He recorded most of the album live at Nashville's Sound Emporium Studios over two quick days. Teaming up with friend and producer Oran Thornton (Miranda Lambert's Revolution, Angaleena Presley's Wrangled) their goal was to create something that reflected the raw, real sound of his concerts, where overdubs and unlimited takes are never an option. The result is a record that reflects Hood's working-class roots, mixing the upbeat thrill of his roadhouse roots-rock songs with the contemplative, stripped-down sway of his country ballads.

    Joining him in the studio were guitarist Pat McLaughlin, bassist Lex Price, and drummer Jerry Roe. All of whom captured their parts in just a handful of live takes while Hood simultaneously tracked his vocals. Stripped free of studio trickery and lushly layered arrangements, Somewhere in Between is an honest, story-driven record. One that’s both relatable and deeply autobiographical, with Hood writing or co-writing ten of the record’s eleven tracks, alongside friends like McLaughlin, Brent Cobb -- who also appears on the electrified "She Don't Love Me" -- Josh Abbott, Jason Eady, and plenty of others.

    Somewhere in Between is an album that finally finds Hood telling his own story. A dedicated family man, he wrote "Locomotive" — a heartland anthem, full of Telecaster twang and sunny swagger — after watching his young daughter develop her motor skills while playing with a set of blocks. Balancing his life as a relentless road-warrior, Hood penned highway ballad "Downturn" about a life filled with wanderlust and long drives from gig to gig.

    As a blue-collar songwriter, Hood shines a light on everyday experiences — from family and friends to the thrill of Friday nights. Partly because he’s stuck to his roots. The native Alabaman still lives in the Yellowhammer State and celebrates America's rural pockets with songs like "Keeping Me Here" and "Real Small Town," two songs filled with images of main streets, open landscapes, hard times, and good people.

    "It's southern music," he says, grouping Somewhere in Between’s wide range of music under an appropriate banner. "That's what it represents: the soulful side of southern music, the country side of southern music, the genuineness of southern culture, and the way I grew up. One of the t-shirts I sell at every show simply says ‘Southern Songs,’ and It's a good summary of what I do. It's what I've always done."

  • Channing Wilson

    Channing Wilson

    Honky Tonk

    "God could you throw this dog a bone. Let me turn the corner and be home. I'm tired of being on this road alone." Real lyrics are what Channing Wilson is all about. 
    From a small town in Northwest Georgia, Channing learned about real life American good times and hardships. He's not afraid to tell you about it either. From his songs like "Poor Man's Cocaine" referring to methamphetamines taking over rural America, to songs like "Crazy Over You" which is a throwback love song to the era of Waylon Jennings and Merle Haggard, Channing's voice along with his lyrics stand alone in a time of mass produced "throwaway" singers and songwriters.
          Brought up on the real side of the tracks by two hard working "dirt collar" parents, he had plenty of opportunities to learn real life at an early age. Channing says "I didn't have a musical family. My mother is a pretty good singer, but an even better worker. So, I found music later than most artists." Finding music later for Channing didn't slow down his passion for it. Learning guitar at 17 and starting writing shortly after. "I came across a book of short poems my mother had written before I was born, and after reading them I was so inspired to explore my own creative side." 
          By age 25, he had flunked out of college and quit more jobs than he applied for. "I never could accept the idea that I was supposed to work every day for someone else. I expected more than a paycheck. After a friend turned me on to Guy Clark and Steve Earle, I knew 2 things. I never wanted to punch a clock again, and I had to become a better writer and musician." That's exactly what he did at 26 years old, he started his first band and quickly learned the ropes as a very successful regional act. That venture lasted 6 years until he became a father and knew he had to step up his game if he was going to turn a dream into a way of life. 
          Selling a fishing boat and a decent guitar collection to finance trips from north Georgia to Nashville every week paid off in October of 2010 he was approached by EMI Music Publishing after playing a Tuesday night showcase called Alabama Line. After meeting with EMI a few times he was offered his first publishing deal. "I didn't know what I had to offer such a big corporate publishing company, but when I looked on the roster and saw Guy Clark I knew I was in." It didn't take long before he was in the room with his teacher. Learning from the master himself. "Just knowing Guy has made me a better man, but getting to share ideas and stories is a dream come true."
          Channing got his first cut with a song titled "Living With The Blues." Sony recording artist Tyler Farr cut the song the same way he heard the demo. Acoustic and raw. Channing even played the guitar track on Tyler's upcoming album. He has been writing with some of Nashville's best writers such as Guy Clark, Ashley Monroe, Drake White, Dave Kennedy and more. All the while pursuing artist acknowledgment. When asked if he wanted to be an artist he replied "If you can't tell I'm an artist by listening to my songs, you're not listening."
          He has shared bills with so many of his heroes such as Billy Joe Shaver, Steve Earle, Robert Earl Keen, Tony Joe White, Chris Knight, Dale Watson, and many more including getting invited to be on the 2012 Country Throwdown Tour. 
          Channing's love for country music history and the future of country music is second to none. "I came to Nashville to make a difference and I'll always work hard to earn respect from my peers. I owe them that at least. Hell, I've played their songs so many times for free." 

  • Erik Dylan

    Erik Dylan

    Country

  • Dave Kennedy

    Dave Kennedy

    Honky Tonk

    After years of paying dues everywhere from dives to theaters, Dave Kennedy has descended on Nashville like whirlwind.  With a voice big enough to grab your attention and songs great enough to hold it, the singer-songwriter and East Tennessee native has spent years developing his craft both as a performer and prolific writer all around the Southeast, and is determined to take his place among the new wave of Americana and more traditional country music artists.  His songs are equal parts heartbreak, redemption, whiskey and truth, which is why he’s quickly becoming a favorite of music fans, songwriters, and artists alike.  Dave has spent the last 7 years tirelessly playing and writing in search of the voice and statement he wants to bring to the music he loves.  With ear and heart ever faithful to the country traditions and journeys of those who came before him, his ability to connect with an audience through both his words and performance is a testament to both his traditional roots and his soulful voice, which resonates with or without a microphone.

Peachtree Entertainment Presents:

Dark Horses feat. Adam Hood, Channing Wilson, Erik Dylan, Dave Kennedy

Sat Dec 9 2017 9:30 PM

(Doors 8:30 PM)

Zydeco Birmingham AL
Dark Horses feat. Adam Hood, Channing Wilson, Erik Dylan, Dave Kennedy
  • Sorry, you missed this event.
  • Check out other similar events on TicketWeb.

Ages 18+

RESERVED SECTION: Included seating at high top table with cocktail service. You must purchase 4 seats.

SEATED SECTION: First come seated chairs in the middle of the room.

GENERAL SECTION: Standing room only in the back of the room.