AMERICANAFEST: Langhorne Slim, Jill Andrews, Peter Bradley Adams, S.G. Goodman, Katie Toupin

Thu Sep 23 2021

7:00 PM (Doors 6:30 PM)

The Basement East

917 Woodland St Nashville, TN 37206

$20.00

Ages 21+

Share With Friends

Share
Tweet

SCHEDULE
7:00 PM Katie Toupin
8:00 PM S.G. Goodman
9:00 PM Peter Bradley Adams
10:00 PM Jill Andrews
11:00 PM Langhorne Slim

By purchasing tickets for this event, I confirm that at the time of the event I will have been fully vaccinated (14 days past final vaccination dose), OR will have received a negative Covid-19 test (PCR or antigen) within 48 hours prior to the event. Children under 12 years of age or fans not vaccinated will be required to present a COVID-19 test result in accordance with these guidelines. Security will check vax cards / test result documentation prior to entry into the venue. Mask wearing will be strongly encouraged.

Effective August 15, 2021 until future notice,  all patrons, artists and staff entering both venues are required to present either proof of a full course of COVID-19 vaccination, with their final dose at least fourteen days prior to the show or proof of a negative COVID-19 test taken in the prior 48 hours.  We will continually assess the information and recommendations provided by the CDC and update our policy as needed. For more info visit thebasementnashville.com

AMERICANAFEST: Langhorne Slim, Jill Andrews, Peter Bradley Adams, S.G. Goodman, Katie Toupin

  • Langhorne Slim

    Langhorne Slim

    Rock

    Sometimes, truth can’t be explained. But it can be felt, running wild through a song. “I don’t want to tame myself. I want to be wild,” says Langhorne Slim. “If I can continue to refine the wildness but never suffocate or tame it, then I’m on the right path. Because it is a path. I feel it.”

    The Spirit Moves is Langhorne’s newest artistic attempt to refine the wildness. The result is an effervescent collection of his now-signature, cinematic, joyful noise, rooted in folk, soul, and blues. Out on Dualtone Records on August 7th, 2015, the album marks his second with rock-solid band The Law, and the highly anticipated follow-up to 2012’s critically acclaimed The Way We Move.

    The Spirit Moves is a stunning portrait of Langhorne’s life in transition: the “born to be in motion and follow the sun” rambler found a home in Nashville, Tennessee. While he’s put down roots in a place, he’s unattached to a person, single for the first time in recent memory. The Spirit Moves is also the first album of his career written and recorded entirely sober. Together, the record’s beautiful glimpses of bold beginnings and risks taken create an ode not only to a better life, but to the vulnerability needed to live it.

    “I’m a strong believer that sensitivity and vulnerability are not weaknesses. They’re some of the greatest strengths of man and woman kind,” Langhorne says. “And that’s what a lot of the record is about.”

    Langhorne and The Law sought out engineer Andrija Tokic (Alabama Shakes, Hurray for the Riff Raff) and recorded The Spirit Moves at Tokic’s studio, the Bomb Shelter, in East Nashville. Producing duties were shouldered by Langhorne, the band, and trusted cohort Kenny Siegal, reuniting the family behind The Way We Move.

    “I went to battle with my demons, and I’m still doing it,” Langhorne says. “My brothers stood beside me and kicked ass on the record.” Three of his brothers are The Law: drummer Malachi DeLorenzo, bassist Jeff Ratner, and keys and banjo player David Moore. “My band is not a hired gun group of guys,” Langhorne says. “They are my band and they are uniquely spectacular.”

    And then, there’s brother Kenny Siegal. “In Kenny, I’ve found a musical brother,” he says. “We drive each other crazy, but the man understands me somehow in an energetic, spiritual sense, more than most anyone I’ve ever met.”

    Langhorne wasn’t looking for a co-writer, but that’s exactly what Siegal became for eight of the record’s songs, making The Spirit Moves the first time Langhorne has ever written with someone else for an album. For Langhorne, writing is often an arduous process.“I rarely write a complete song immediately,” he explains. “Every once in a while, one hits, but songs mostly come in pieces. Those pieces build up and start to taunt me as they swirl around in my head. Eventually, they make me feel like I’m going totally crazy. It’s like they’re gonna devour me––eat me alive.”

    He pushed through alone to pen some of the tracks, chasing each song’s individual truth. In creating others, Siegal helped him put the pieces together.

    What emerged is a record that delights in contradiction: freewheeling but purposeful; celebratory but confessional; looking to light even when it’s dark. Langhorne’s voice––an arresting howl sublimely at home in a Mississippi roadhouse or on a Newport stage––has never sounded better.

    He wrote the title track just weeks before entering the studio, “terrified that I didn’t have enough and what I had wasn’t good enough.” The song is no mere reflection, but a manifestation of unbridled joy, and a celebration of opening up oneself to the supernatural that surrounds us.

    “Changes” is an intimate look at a soul being reborn, but Langhorne hopes each listener can hear something of their own in it. “When I’m writing, it’s coming from a heart or soul kind of place, not the mental zone of ‘Well, I moved to Nashville and I got sober and I’m single and I’m going through changes, so let’s write a song about it,’” he says. He calls infectious garage-pop growler “Put it Together” “the most painful song I’ve ever written,” not because of the subject matter, but because of the process. He found the opening lines and crunchy chords while seeking relief after his beloved 1977 Mercury Comet was stolen. But then, the song took months to complete. “I’ve never worked that hard to get a song,” he says.

    The refusal to let a heart harden helped bring about “Life’s a Bell,” a dreamy call-to-action that nods to 50s rock-and-roll and Sly and the Family Stone. “A lot of my music is celebration of light,” he says. “It’s a horrible thing to shield our hearts and not be vulnerable.”

    “Wolves,” based on a James Kavanaugh poem, tackles similar subject matter, and Langhorne feels it’s the “truest expression of myself that I’ve put into a song.” “I’m tough enough to run with the bulls, and I’m too gentle to live amongst wolves,” he sings, his soul-shouting subdued to a hush that’s just as powerful.

    The rollicking “Southern Bells” pulses with the optimism of a new day, while “Strongman” and its piano pay tribute to perseverance and seizing the moment. “Whisperin’” captures another kind of breakthrough, relatable and intense, while “Strangers” is classic Langhorne Slim, and begs to be danced to, uninhibited and free.

    “Airplane” is a poignant example of his ability to capture the redemptive hope in desperation. Part meditation, part urging of an unnamed co-conspirator, the song puts his defiantly tender vocals front and center, hugged by a rotating cast of instruments that kicks off with stark guitar and piano, swells into lush strings and percussion, then ebbs back into its stripped-down beginning––like the waves of confidence and doubt that make up faith itself.

    The song is undoubtedly a career standout for Langhorne, and creating it was a long road. Three key “muses”––his Grandma Ruth, dear friend Joel Sadler, and another confidant––gave him encouragement along the way. “I kept going for ‘Airplane’ because it made sense to me and there were people around me who were moved very deeply by it,” he says. “It’s one of my favorite songs I’ve ever written.”

    With a new home and a clear head, Langhorne is exhilarated thanks to the realization of what he knew was possible. “I had a problem with drugs and alcohol from the time I was 15 until I quit last year on my 33rd birthday,” Langhorne says. “I was hitting my head against the ceiling. I knew all I had to do was quit, and my head would burst through that ceiling. I didn’t really know what would be there, but I knew it’d be something greater.”

    For Langhorne, something greater includes making the best music of his life.

    “By opening myself, I’m vulnerable and I’m fearful, but I start to get real. And in that realness, there is immense strength that I wish for everybody,” Langhorne says. “Maybe everybody’s scared to be a freak. But when you live as a freak––” he laughs––“it’s so much more fulfilling.”

    – Elisabeth Dawson, 2015

  • Jill Andrews

    Jill Andrews

    Americana

  • Peter Bradley Adams

    Peter Bradley Adams

    Alternative

    "Adams is fast developing as a songwriter who both inspires and questions"
    - Nic Harcourt / Los Angeles Times Magazine - Jan 2010

    "...one of the 21st-century writers whose songs are worth exploring.”
    - Wall Street Journal - 2009

    "…one of the most consistently eloquent and pleasing singer / songwriters on the scene. Indeed, his brand of musical melancholy is so specific and evocative that, sometimes, listening through his catalog is the only way to survive a moment or a day." 
    - No Depression - 2014

    "...Adams fuses intimate, emotionally powerful lyrics with graceful, low-key roots-based indie folk on his fifth solo effort, The Mighty Storm … both soothing and challenging" 
    - All Music Guide - 2014

    "…an organic record, executed with precision and feeling... possessed of a coherent musical vision and emotional resonance that stands above the crowd. T Bone Burnett would be likely to give this one a nod.”
    - Minor 7th - 2014

    "...The Mighty Storm, his fifth album, recorded in Nashville, is a wondrous, poetic collection of enchanting songs" 
    - Entertainment Realm Blog - 2014

  • S.G. Goodman

    S.G. Goodman

    Country Folk

  • Katie Toupin

    Katie Toupin

    Country Folk

    The solo debut from Katie Toupin, Magnetic Moves takes its title from its spellbinding opening track, a song that’s quietly defiant in its bending of reality. “It’s about being bold and being brave, and using your magnetism to create the world you want to live in,” says the L.A.-based singer/songwriter. “The whole album came from a place of wanting to be completely direct, in a way I never felt I could before. I think it’s important to let yourself show your heart like that.”

    In the spirit of self-reliance, Toupin took the reins in producing Magnetic Moves, her first full-length since leaving acclaimed alt-country band Houndmouth in 2016. Although she’d originally cut several songs with other producers, an impromptu recording session during a stop in Austin on her 2018 house tour inspired her to strike out on her own. “Every time I’d tried working with other people, it never turned out in a way that felt right to me,” she says. “And then when I finally tried producing by myself, it felt so easy—I realized I knew exactly what I wanted everything to sound like; I just needed the confidence to actually do it.”

    Mixed by Steve Christensen (a Grammy Award-winner known for his work with Steve Earle), Magnetic Moves came to life in two marathon sessions at The Finishing School in Austin. With multi-instrumentalist Scott Davis and percussionist Josh Blue accompanying Toupin, the album unfolds in a dreamy pastiche of soul and pop and brightly jangly ’70s rock, a sound that’s lavishly detailed but fantastically fluid. And in her unfussy yet radiant vocal performance, Toupin channels both self-possession and raw vulnerability, fully inhabiting each state of being.

    Throughout Magnetic Moves, Toupin speaks to the power in embracing messy feelings like regret and obsession and, in the case of the wildly anthemic “Run to You,” falling for someone who’s all wrong for your heart. On “Real Love,” the sigh of Davis’s slide guitar amps up the torchy intensity of Toupin’s vocals, its lyrics capturing the hurt that sometimes follows loving without reserve. “In relationships it can be difficult to know whether to give up or try harder,” she says. “I think most people give up a little too quickly these days, so I wanted to write about allowing yourself to have that passion.” And on “The Hills Are Calling,” Magnetic Moves slips into delicate psychedelia as Toupin contemplates a rarely examined aspect of romantic infidelity. “It’s so easy to be unempathetic toward the person who’s fallen in love with someone else, we forget that there’s a lot of pain on that side of the equation too,” she notes.

    As the first track that Toupin self-produced for Magnetic Moves, “The Hills Are Calling” also reveals the playful creativity behind her sonic approach. “That one came together in a very piece-by-piece way,” says Toupin, pointing to the picked-cello part performed by Portland-based musician Alexis Mahler as the song’s initial driving force. “We kept piling on all these different pieces—the kick drum and tambourine and cymbal swells and snaps—and filling up the space very intricately. It’s not how you’d usually do things in the studio, but it all felt so natural.”

    As Magnetic Moves endlessly warps genres and shifts tones, Toupin taps into the soulful musicality she first discovered as a teenager in Southern Indiana. “Throughout high school I was sort of troubled and dealt with some health problems, and I ended up graduating early and going to college for about a nanosecond,” she says. But at age 18, Toupin felt suddenly compelled to make music—a prospect wholly encouraged by her father, an accomplished blues guitarist. “I went to my dad one day and said, ‘Can you just teach me music instead of me going to school?’ And right away he said, ‘Absolutely,’” she remembers. Along with taking opera-singing lessons, Toupin learned to play guitar from her father and immersed herself in a self-directed study of songcraft. “I started dissecting what other artists and artists were actually doing in their phrasing and in their melodies, and learning all the tricks of songwriting,” says Toupin, naming Bob Dylan, Patsy Cline, Gillian Welch, and The Rolling Stones among her early inspirations.

    After two years of refining her skills, Toupin began writing songs of her own, drawing from her experience as a longtime poet and steadily developing the disciplined practice she follows today. “For a while now I’ve had a routine of waking up in the morning and writing like it’s my job until the afternoon,” she says. “Sometimes good things happen and sometimes not, but you just do it anyway. And it always feels like the best things happen when I can get out of the way and just put whatever comes through me down on paper, without ever thinking about it too much.”

    In the making of Magnetic Moves, Toupin let her intuition guide her to everything from the harmony-heavy gospel of “Lost Sometimes” to the Beatles-esque psych-pop of “In Your Dreams” (with both tracks featuring the showstopping vocals of Austin-based soul singers Lauren Marie and Angela Miller). As Toupin explains, the album’s imaginative sonic palette has much to do with the unprecedented freedom she felt her entire time in the studio. “Making this record with people I didn’t already know was an incredibly liberating factor,” she points out. “When people have preconceived notions of who you are and what you do, it can really hold you back. But with this album I was able step way outside my comfort zone—I felt confident to do things I would’ve normally been afraid of.”

    For Toupin, eliminating those expectations ultimately elevated her to a new and far more fulfilling level of self-expression—an element she hopes might leave an indelible impact on the listener. “I’m such a romantic, and I’d never felt like I could really own that the way I did on this record,” she says. “In the past there was an agreement as to what you could say in a song and what you couldn’t say, what was cool and what wasn’t cool. When people hear this album, I hope they come away with a really strong feeling of love, whether it’s romantic or some other form. I want everyone to feel okay just wearing their heart on their sleeve.”

Please correct the information below.

Select ticket quantity.

Complete the security check.

Select Tickets

limit 4 per person
G.A.

General Admission (first-come, first-served seating)

$20.00

Delivery Method

ticketFast
Will Call

Terms & Conditions

This event is 21 and over. Any Ticket holder unable to present valid identification indicating that they are at least 21 years of age will not be admitted to this event, and will not be eligible for a refund.

By purchasing tickets for this event, I confirm that at the time of the event I will have been fully vaccinated (14 days past final vaccination dose), OR will have received a negative Covid-19 test (administered by a Health Care Professional) within 48 hours prior to the event. Children under 12 years of age or fans not vaccinated will be required to present a COVID-19 test result in accordance with these guidelines. Security will check vax cards / test result documentation prior to entry into the venue. Mask wearing will be strongly encouraged.

Effective August 15, 2021 until future notice, all patrons, artists and staff entering both venues are required to present either proof of a full course of COVID-19 vaccination, with their final dose at least fourteen days prior to the show or proof of a negative COVID-19 test taken in the prior 48 hours. No at-home tests accepted. We will continually assess the information and recommendations provided by the CDC and update our policy as needed. More Info: https://www.thebasementnashville.com/

ALL PATRONS MUST BRING A VALID FORM OF IDENTIFICATION.

WE ONLY ACCEPT TICKETWEB TICKETS.

BACKPACKS ARE NOT ALLOWED IN THE VENUE
Most shows are standing room only.
Handicap accommodations can be arranged.
ALL ALL AGES and 18+ SHOWS ARE NO RE-ENTRY

AMERICANAFEST: Langhorne Slim, Jill Andrews, Peter Bradley Adams, S.G. Goodman, Katie Toupin

Thu Sep 23 2021 7:00 PM

(Doors 6:30 PM)

The Basement East Nashville TN
AMERICANAFEST: Langhorne Slim, Jill Andrews, Peter Bradley Adams, S.G. Goodman, Katie Toupin

$20.00 Ages 21+

SCHEDULE
7:00 PM Katie Toupin
8:00 PM S.G. Goodman
9:00 PM Peter Bradley Adams
10:00 PM Jill Andrews
11:00 PM Langhorne Slim

By purchasing tickets for this event, I confirm that at the time of the event I will have been fully vaccinated (14 days past final vaccination dose), OR will have received a negative Covid-19 test (PCR or antigen) within 48 hours prior to the event. Children under 12 years of age or fans not vaccinated will be required to present a COVID-19 test result in accordance with these guidelines. Security will check vax cards / test result documentation prior to entry into the venue. Mask wearing will be strongly encouraged.

Effective August 15, 2021 until future notice,  all patrons, artists and staff entering both venues are required to present either proof of a full course of COVID-19 vaccination, with their final dose at least fourteen days prior to the show or proof of a negative COVID-19 test taken in the prior 48 hours.  We will continually assess the information and recommendations provided by the CDC and update our policy as needed. For more info visit thebasementnashville.com

Please correct the information below.

Select ticket quantity.

Complete the security check.

Select Tickets

Ages 21+
limit 4 per person
G.A.
General Admission (first-come, first-served seating)
$20.00

Delivery Method

ticketFast
Will Call

Terms & Conditions

This event is 21 and over. Any Ticket holder unable to present valid identification indicating that they are at least 21 years of age will not be admitted to this event, and will not be eligible for a refund. By purchasing tickets for this event, I confirm that at the time of the event I will have been fully vaccinated (14 days past final vaccination dose), OR will have received a negative Covid-19 test (administered by a Health Care Professional) within 48 hours prior to the event. Children under 12 years of age or fans not vaccinated will be required to present a COVID-19 test result in accordance with these guidelines. Security will check vax cards / test result documentation prior to entry into the venue. Mask wearing will be strongly encouraged.

Effective August 15, 2021 until future notice, all patrons, artists and staff entering both venues are required to present either proof of a full course of COVID-19 vaccination, with their final dose at least fourteen days prior to the show or proof of a negative COVID-19 test taken in the prior 48 hours. No at-home tests accepted. We will continually assess the information and recommendations provided by the CDC and update our policy as needed. More Info: https://www.thebasementnashville.com/

ALL PATRONS MUST BRING A VALID FORM OF IDENTIFICATION.

WE ONLY ACCEPT TICKETWEB TICKETS.

BACKPACKS ARE NOT ALLOWED IN THE VENUE
Most shows are standing room only.
Handicap accommodations can be arranged.
ALL ALL AGES and 18+ SHOWS ARE NO RE-ENTRY