Thu Nov 6 2014

8:00 PM (Doors 7:00 PM)

SPACE

1245 Chicago Avenue Evanston, IL 60202

All Ages

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He’s been called an edgy urban poet, the sound of New York, a confessional singer-songwriter, and an explorer of the links between rock, race and rebellion whose work should be taught in schools. With songs covered by artists as diverse as punk pioneers The Circle Jerks (“Wild in the Streets”) and the neo-folk band Vetiver (“Lon Chaney”), Jeffreys is truly unclassifiable.

After a hiatus from recording during which he helped raise his daughter, Jeffreys released The King Of In Between on his own Luna Park label. Co-produced with Larry Campbell (Grammy-winning producer with Levon Helm) the album marks a return to the more rootsy sounds of his earlier work, especially the acclaimed 1977 Ghost Writer.

Long known for his amazing roster of supporting musicians, with names such as Dr. John, Sonny Rollins, James Taylor, Linton Kwesi Johnson, Phoebe Snow, and Sly and Robbie, The King of In Between doesn’t disappoint. Among the contributors are Duncan Sheik, with caterwauling guitar on “I’m Alive,” and old friend Lou Reed on the insinuating doo-doo-doo backing vocals on “The Contortionist.” “My then fourteen-year old daughter came to the studio and laid down a doubling vocal on top of Lou’s part. I don’t think she understands how cool that really is—yet,” said Jeffreys.

Another theme that emerged was the strong connection to his childhood and growing up next to Coney Island. That affection led to the ripping last-minute one-take track “Coney Island Winter.” The song is a wintry clarion call to the powers that be, to the politicians who “say they’re going to fix this town,” but meanwhile “Jobs are gone, they came and went/all the money has been spent/all the games are broken down.”

After a string of records in the seventies including American Boy & Girl, One-Eyed Jack and Ghost Writer, the eighties brought the fiercely rocking Escape Artist, which yielded radio favorites “R.O.C.K.” and a cover of garage classic “96 Tears.” After Guts for Love, a record chronicling the ups and downs of a long-term relationship, Jeffreys returned with Don’t Call Me Buckwheat, a complex and searingly honest exploration of being biracial in America.

“I couldn’t be happier with the new record. It’s been a labor of love and it’s completely true to me, a real reflection of everything I stand for. I’m back and I plan to remain on the never-ending tour.”

SPACE & 93XRT present
93XRT welcomes Garland Jeffreys with Nicholas Tremulis

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  • Check out other similar events on TicketWeb.
  • Garland Jeffreys

    Garland Jeffreys

    Alternative Rock

    He’s been called an edgy urban poet, the sound of New York, a confessional singer-songwriter, and an explorer of the links between rock, race and rebellion whose work should be taught in schools. With songs covered by artists as diverse as punk pioneers The Circle Jerks (“Wild in the Streets”) and the neo-folk band Vetiver (“Lon Chaney”), Jeffreys is truly unclassifiable.

    After a hiatus from recording during which he helped raise his daughter, Jeffreys released The King Of In Between on his own Luna Park label. Co-produced with Larry Campbell (Grammy-winning producer with Levon Helm) the album marks a return to the more rootsy sounds of his earlier work, especially the acclaimed 1977 Ghost Writer.

    Long known for his amazing roster of supporting musicians, with names such as Dr. John, Sonny Rollins, James Taylor, Linton Kwesi Johnson, Phoebe Snow, and Sly and Robbie, The King of In Between doesn’t disappoint. Among the contributors are Duncan Sheik, with caterwauling guitar on “I’m Alive,” and old friend Lou Reed on the insinuating doo-doo-doo backing vocals on “The Contortionist.” “My then fourteen-year old daughter came to the studio and laid down a doubling vocal on top of Lou’s part. I don’t think she understands how cool that really is—yet,” said Jeffreys.

    Another theme that emerged was the strong connection to his childhood and growing up next to Coney Island. That affection led to the ripping last-minute one-take track “Coney Island Winter.” The song is a wintry clarion call to the powers that be, to the politicians who “say they’re going to fix this town,” but meanwhile “Jobs are gone, they came and went/all the money has been spent/all the games are broken down.”

    After a string of records in the seventies including American Boy & Girl, One-Eyed Jack and Ghost Writer, the eighties brought the fiercely rocking Escape Artist, which yielded radio favorites “R.O.C.K.” and a cover of garage classic “96 Tears.” After Guts for Love, a record chronicling the ups and downs of a long-term relationship, Jeffreys returned with Don’t Call Me Buckwheat, a complex and searingly honest exploration of being biracial in America.
    “I couldn’t be happier with the new record. It’s been a labor of love and it’s completely true to me, a real reflection of everything I stand for. I’m back and I plan to remain on the never-ending tour.”

  • Nicholas Tremulis

    Nicholas Tremulis

    Pop

    Formed in 1982, the first incarnation of Nicholas Tremulis was described as "Punk Jazz", drawing on early punk music, as well as James Brown funk and the harmolodic jazz movement of Ornette Coleman. A single was released on Disturbing Records in 1983 produced by Craig Williams.

    By 1985 the band had morphed into a large modern funk/soul unit and was signed by Chris Blackwell to Island Records, releasing 2 records in the late 80's, "Nicholas Tremulis", produced with Craig Williams and "More Than The Truth", with guest artists Maceo Parker (James Brown) and Bonnie Raitt, produced by Rob Fraboni. (Stones, Dylan, The Band)

    After leaving Island in 1989, the new stripped down, loud rock version of the band released an EP "King Of The Hill" in 1994 on Monsterdisc and full-length version "Bloody Show" in 1995 on Black Vinyl Records.

    Both releases feature collaborative performances with famed Beat poet Gregory Corso. The album was produced in part with percussionist Michael Blair, (Tom Waits) and Jeff Murphy. (The Shoes)

    In 2000, Nicholas Tremulis Band released "In Search Of Woodfoot" on QRS records. A folk rock oriented record featuring a duet with Rick Danko (The Band). The album was recorded by Rick Barnes and Derek Brand, as well as 2 cuts by Rob Fraboni.

    From the years 2000 to 2004, the Nicholas Tremulis Orchestra, along with WXRT, The Metro, and Jam Productions hosted a charity concert for Neon Street for Homeless Youth entitled 'The Waltz'. The annual concert was inspired by The Band's filmed farewell concert "The Last Waltz" and features NTO as backing band to guest artists from across the American musical landscape.

    Some artists Nick and band have performed with in this series as well as the studio are Rick Danko, Billy Corgan, Alejandro Escovedo, David Amram, Ian Hunter, Blondie Chaplin, Lonnie Brooks, Jeff Tweedy, Gary Louris, Steve Earl, Graham Parker, James White, Ivan Neville, Ronnie Spector, Mavis Staples, Hubert Sumlin, Sir Mac Rice, David Johansen, Chris Whitley, Marianne Faithful, Sonny Landreth, Blondie Chaplin and Keith Richards to name a few.

    A VHS version of The First Waltz is available on Palm Pictures and was filmed and directed by Daniel Andries. The concert series has raised over $250,000 dollars. A DVD retrospective of the series is in production.

    In 2004, NTO released "Napoleon" on Texas Music Group. A mostly live/ambient recording with long time collaborator/producer Rob Fraboni. The album features guest artists, Alejandro Escovedo and Ivan Neville.

    NTO also contributed a version of Escovedo's "Velvet Guitar" for the tribute/relief record "Por Vida", on Or Music. This is also produced by Rob Fraboni.

    NTO has toured extensively in the states as well as Europe.

    In 2006 through 2007, NTO embarked on the yearlong digital musical journey entitled "52 REASONS". Nick and band wrote and recorded a song a week for an entire year for download to the masses, either by song or subscription. Each song was debuted on The Eclectic Company, (Nick and Jon Langford's weekly freeform radio show, Tuesday nights on WXRT.) The entire 52 weeks of music was partnered with New York digital label, Reel To Reel Records.

    2008 marked the beginning of Nick's new imprint label, 52 Recordings, with the release of two new records. One was a solo album, "Little Big Songs". The other was a full on NTO album entitled, "Pinky".

SPACE & 93XRT present

93XRT welcomes Garland Jeffreys with Nicholas Tremulis

Thu Nov 6 2014 8:00 PM

(Doors 7:00 PM)

SPACE Evanston IL
93XRT welcomes Garland Jeffreys with Nicholas Tremulis
  • Sorry, you missed this event.
  • Check out other similar events on TicketWeb.

All Ages

He’s been called an edgy urban poet, the sound of New York, a confessional singer-songwriter, and an explorer of the links between rock, race and rebellion whose work should be taught in schools. With songs covered by artists as diverse as punk pioneers The Circle Jerks (“Wild in the Streets”) and the neo-folk band Vetiver (“Lon Chaney”), Jeffreys is truly unclassifiable.

After a hiatus from recording during which he helped raise his daughter, Jeffreys released The King Of In Between on his own Luna Park label. Co-produced with Larry Campbell (Grammy-winning producer with Levon Helm) the album marks a return to the more rootsy sounds of his earlier work, especially the acclaimed 1977 Ghost Writer.

Long known for his amazing roster of supporting musicians, with names such as Dr. John, Sonny Rollins, James Taylor, Linton Kwesi Johnson, Phoebe Snow, and Sly and Robbie, The King of In Between doesn’t disappoint. Among the contributors are Duncan Sheik, with caterwauling guitar on “I’m Alive,” and old friend Lou Reed on the insinuating doo-doo-doo backing vocals on “The Contortionist.” “My then fourteen-year old daughter came to the studio and laid down a doubling vocal on top of Lou’s part. I don’t think she understands how cool that really is—yet,” said Jeffreys.

Another theme that emerged was the strong connection to his childhood and growing up next to Coney Island. That affection led to the ripping last-minute one-take track “Coney Island Winter.” The song is a wintry clarion call to the powers that be, to the politicians who “say they’re going to fix this town,” but meanwhile “Jobs are gone, they came and went/all the money has been spent/all the games are broken down.”

After a string of records in the seventies including American Boy & Girl, One-Eyed Jack and Ghost Writer, the eighties brought the fiercely rocking Escape Artist, which yielded radio favorites “R.O.C.K.” and a cover of garage classic “96 Tears.” After Guts for Love, a record chronicling the ups and downs of a long-term relationship, Jeffreys returned with Don’t Call Me Buckwheat, a complex and searingly honest exploration of being biracial in America.

“I couldn’t be happier with the new record. It’s been a labor of love and it’s completely true to me, a real reflection of everything I stand for. I’m back and I plan to remain on the never-ending tour.”