Walter "Wolfman" Washington and the Roadmasters, Little Freddie King, Honey Island Swamp Band, With Special Guest John Mooney, and more!

Sat May 6 2017

9:00 PM (Doors 8:00 PM)

Carver Theater

2101 Orleans Avenue New Orleans, LA 70116

Ages 21+

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Great music begins with great songs, and great songs are what the Honey Island Swamp Band is all about. The band came together when Aaron Wilkinson (acoustic guitar, mandolin, vocals) and Chris Mulé (electric guitar, vocals) were marooned in San Francisco after the levee breaches following Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans. After a chance encounter with fellow New Orleans evacuees Sam Price (bass, vocals) and Garland Paul (drums, vocals), and with no prospects of getting home any time soon, they figured they’d better cook up something new, and quick!

Honey Island Swamp Band's music has been described as "Bayou Americana", with timeless songs from Wilkinson & Mulé, highlighted by Mulé's searing guitar, Wilkinson's sure-handed mandolin, and 4-part vocal harmonies, all anchored by the powerful groove of Price & Paul's Louisiana stomp rhythm section. The addition of Trevor Brooks on Hammond B-3 organ to the HISB family in 2010 has rounded out the band’s sound, which draws from a variety of influences in the world of roots music.

Walter “Wolfman” Washington has been a mainstay on the New Orleans music scene.  He cut his teeth backing up some of the best singers and performers in New Orleans history before putting together his long time band The Roadmasters who have been burning down and burning up local and national stages since their first gigs in the 1980s.  His guitar style combines both rhythm and blues, blues, New Orleans funk, and modern jazz into a way of playing that is uniquely his.  His singing is emotional and heartfelt.  His guitar work is intricate, intimate, and full.  There is a little Bobby Blue Bland, a little Kenny Burrell, a little George Benson, a little church, and a lot of New Orleans charm and experience in a Walter Wolfman Washington performance. And in this day and age of musicians imitating the past or trying to recreate it, The Wolfman stands out as a musician steeped in the history but completely contemporary.  Few musical acts, if any, do what he does.  He is real, authentic, and unique.

Little Freddie King is a country-style blues musician, of an era when live music poured from the back-of-town nightclubs throughout New Orleans’ African-American neighborhoods, fostering a subculture of downhome Mississippi blues that developed from the ground up in New Orleans. He is also one of the few survivors and the last of what has become a footnote to the Great Migration of Southern blacks: the Mississippi country bluesmen who carried their tradition farther south rather than north.

"You Made My Night" is Little Freddie King's way of saying "thank you" to his rowdy, enthusiastic audience after one of his classic low down and dirty blues performances. This recording features authentic "juke-joint" music in which perfect pitch and well-tuned guitars just don't matter. He's got a rough Mississippi roots electric sound with a New Orleans edge. His brand of the blues is moonshine dripping from the back porch, still-made from the remnants of the Delta farm, until jumping a train to N.O. His sound is harsh,dirty and powerfully authentic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Walter "Wolfman" Washington and the Roadmasters, Little Freddie King, Honey Island Swamp Band, With Special Guest John Mooney, and more!

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  • Walter "Wolfman" Washington and the Roadmasters

    Walter "Wolfman" Washington and the Roadmasters

    New Orleans Blues

     

    Walter “Wolfman” Washington has been a mainstay on the New Orleans music scene.  He cut his teeth backing up some of the best singers and performers in New Orleans history before putting together his long time band The Roadmasters who have been burning down and burning up local and national stages since their first gigs in the 1980s.  His guitar style combines both rhythm and blues, blues, New Orleans funk, and modern jazz into a way of playing that is uniquely his.  His singing is emotional and heartfelt.  His guitar work is intricate, intimate, and full.  There is a little Bobby Blue Bland, a little Kenny Burrell, a little George Benson, a little church, and a lot of New Orleans charm and experience in a Walter Wolfman Washington performance. And in this day and age of musicians imitating the past or trying to recreate it, The Wolfman stands out as a musician steeped in the history but completely contemporary.  Few musical acts, if any, do what he does.  He is real, authentic, and unique.

  • Little Freddie King

    Little Freddie King

    Blues

    King is a country-style blues musician, linked to an era when live music poured from the back-of-town nightclubs that were ubiquitous throughout New Orleans’ African-American neighborhoods, fostering a musical subculture of downhome Mississippi blues that developed from the ground up in New Orleans. He is also one of the few survivors and the last of what has become a footnote to the Great Migration of Southern blacks: the Mississippi country bluesmen like Boogie Bill Webb, Jewell “Babe” Stovall, and Arzo Youngblood who carried their tradition farther south rather than north.

     

    “YOU MADE MY NIGHT” (MWR72) 2017is Little Freddie King’s way of saying “thank you” to his rowdy and enthusiastic audience after one of his classic low down dirty blues performances. The songs are a mixture of originals and four of his favorites from his blues friends.This recording is a “time-capsule” featuring eleven tracks of authentic “juke joint” style music in which perfect pitch and well-tuned guitars just don’t matter. He’s got a rough Mississippi roots electric sound with a New Orleans edge. His brand of the blues is moonshine dripping from the backyard porch, still made from the remnants of the Delta farm he was raised, until jumping a train to New Orleans. His sound is harsh, dirty and powerfully authentic.  

  • Honey Island Swamp Band

    Honey Island Swamp Band

    Funk

    Great music begins with great songs, and great songs are what the Honey Island Swamp Band is all about. The band came together when Aaron Wilkinson (acoustic guitar, mandolin, vocals) and Chris Mulé (electric guitar, vocals) were marooned in San Francisco after the levee breaches following Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans. After a chance encounter with fellow New Orleans evacuees Sam Price (bass, vocals) and Garland Paul (drums, vocals), and with no prospects of getting home any time soon, they figured they’d better cook up something new, and quick!

    A few days later they had put together a song list, landed a weekly gig at San Francisco’s Boom Boom Room, and settled in to share a little taste of Southern culture with their new West coast neighbors. Their 7-song eponymous debut was recorded in 2006 at famed Record Plant studios in Sausalito, CA, and was received so well that the band decided to make the new group priority number one upon moving back to New Orleans in early 2008.

    Honey Island Swamp Band's music has been described as "Bayou Americana", with timeless songs from Wilkinson & Mulé, highlighted by Mulé's searing guitar, Wilkinson's sure-handed mandolin, and 4-part vocal harmonies, all anchored by the powerful groove of Price & Paul's Louisiana stomp rhythm section. The addition of Trevor Brooks on Hammond B-3 organ to the HISB family in 2010 has rounded out the band’s sound, which draws from a variety of influences in the world of roots music, including artists such as Lowell George & Little Feat, The Band, Taj Mahal, Gram Parsons, Jerry Garcia, Johnny Cash, Jimmy Reed, Clarence “Gatemouth” Brown, and New Orleans’ own Earl King and Dr. John.

    In April 2009, the band released its first full-length album – Wishing Well – and on the strength of such songs as "Natural Born Fool", "Till the Money's Gone", and the album's title track, Wishing Well was awarded 2009's “Best Blues Album” by OffBeat Magazine, which also named HISB as 2009’s “Best Emerging Artist” and 2010’s “Best Roots Rock Artist”. Most recently HISB won the award for “Best Roots Rock Artist” of 2011 at the Big Easy Awards, New Orleans' most prestigious arts & entertainment honors.

    Named after a very real swamp that lies near the border of Louisiana and Mississippi, the Honey Island Swamp Band is aptly named, with a rootsy sound that incorporates the best of both states. The group's music is a swampy mix of blues, soul, country, R&B, and the rhythms of the group's hometown, New Orleans. The band didn't come together in New Orleans, though, but formed instead in San Francisco, where Aaron Wilkinson (guitar, mandolin, vocals), Chris Mule (guitar, vocals), Sam Price (bass, vocals), and Garland Paul (drums, vocals) were all evacuees from New Orleans in the wake of Hurricane Katrina. The band relocated back to New Orleans in 2007, adding Trevor Brooks on the Hammond B-3 organ and other keyboards in 2010. Described as "bayou Americana," the band released a seven-song self-titled EP, Honey Island Swamp Band, in 2008, following it with a full-length album, Wishing Well, a year later in 2009. Good to You appeared in 2010, and the group's raucous appearance at the 2011 New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival was preserved on the album Live at Jazz Fest 2011. Honey Island Swamp Band's 2012 stand at the New Orleans Jazz Fest was also released as a live album, with the studio set Cane Sugar arriving in 2013. In 2016, the group teamed up with the independent Ruf Records label to release its fourth full-length studio album, Demolition Day. ~ Steve Leggett, Rovi

    Named after a very real swamp that lies near the border of Louisiana and Mississippi, the Honey Island Swamp Band is aptly named, with a rootsy sound that incorporates the best of both states. The group's music is a swampy mix of blues, soul, country, R&B, and the rhythms of the group's hometown, New Orleans. The band didn't come together in New Orleans, though, but formed instead in San Francisco, where Aaron Wilkinson (guitar, mandolin, vocals), Chris Mule (guitar, vocals), Sam Price (bass, vocals), and Garland Paul (drums, vocals) were all evacuees from New Orleans in the wake of Hurricane Katrina. The band relocated back to New Orleans in 2007, adding Trevor Brooks on the Hammond B-3 organ and other keyboards in 2010. Described as "bayou Americana," the band released a seven-song self-titled EP, Honey Island Swamp Band, in 2008, following it with a full-length album, Wishing Well, a year later in 2009. Good to You appeared in 2010, and the group's raucous appearance at the 2011 New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival was preserved on the album Live at Jazz Fest 2011. Honey Island Swamp Band's 2012 stand at the New Orleans Jazz Fest was also released as a live album, with the studio set Cane Sugar arriving in 2013. In 2016, the group teamed up with the independent Ruf Records label to release its fourth full-length studio album, Demolition Day. ~ Steve Leggett, Rovi

    Named after a very real swamp that lies near the border of Louisiana and Mississippi, the Honey Island Swamp Band is aptly named, with a rootsy sound that incorporates the best of both states. The group's music is a swampy mix of blues, soul, country, R&B, and the rhythms of the group's hometown, New Orleans. The band didn't come together in New Orleans, though, but formed instead in San Francisco, where Aaron Wilkinson (guitar, mandolin, vocals), Chris Mule (guitar, vocals), Sam Price (bass, vocals), and Garland Paul (drums, vocals) were all evacuees from New Orleans in the wake of Hurricane Katrina. The band relocated back to New Orleans in 2007, adding Trevor Brooks on the Hammond B-3 organ and other keyboards in 2010. Described as "bayou Americana," the band released a seven-song self-titled EP, Honey Island Swamp Band, in 2008, following it with a full-length album, Wishing Well, a year later in 2009. Good to You appeared in 2010, and the group's raucous appearance at the 2011 New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival was preserved on the album Live at Jazz Fest 2011. Honey Island Swamp Band's 2012 stand at the New Orleans Jazz Fest was also released as a live album, with the studio set Cane Sugar arriving in 2013. In 2016, the group teamed up with the independent Ruf Records label to release its fourth full-length studio album, Demolition Day. ~ Steve Leggett, Rovi

    You Know I'm No Good

  • With Special Guest John Mooney

    With Special Guest John Mooney

    Music

    Throughout the years John Mooney has developed one of the most distinctive and easily identifiable guitar and vocal signatures of anyone alive today.

    Part of the original impetus for his interest in music may have filtered down from his grandfather, a musician himself. “He used to play the mandolin and banjo back in the 20’s” says Mooney. “He even cut a couple of 78’s for the Peerless label that I’ve heard. It was really hot stuff, a kind of raggy jazz.“ John left home at 15 and began playing with Joe Beard at about that same time. Joe introduced him to the first and most enduring influence on the development of Mooney’s music, the legendary Delta blues singer, Ed “Son” House. Impressed by the 16 year old musician’s talent, Son and John soon became friends. “I wasn’t aware of what the opportunity meant, but I knew there was nobody better in Delta blues.“ Mooney cites Son’s heavily rhythmic style having a strong influence on him. In fact, the way Mooney adapts acoustic playing to a modern electric format is one of his most distinctive trademarks.

    In 1976 John moved to New Orleans and immersed himself in that city’s vibrant music scene. John regularly played with the likes of Earl King, The Meters, Snooks Eaglin, and the man who was to influence his music greatly, the father of New Orleans piano, Professor Longhair. He was playing regularly in front of New Orleans drummers like Zigaboo Modeliste, John Vidacovich, and Herman Ernest. At this place in time John successfully combined the sounds of the delta with the syncopated rhythms of the Crescent City to create the style that has become uniquely his own.

    Since 1981 he has been touring with his group, the Bluesiana Band, performing throughout the U.S., Canada, Panama, Europe, Australia, and Japan. After the loss of long time friend and band member Jeff Sarli, Mooney has called upon Rene Coman of the Iguanas for Bluesiana Bass rhythms and renowned New Orleans drummer Kevin O’Day to keep the beat. Over the years John and his band have earned a musical reputation that have gained them invitations to play at numerous folk, jazz, and blues festivals across the globe, including the Montreaux Jazz Festival, the Newport Folk Festival, the Chicago Blues Festival, and a yearly appearance at New Orleans’ world renowned Jazz & Heritage Festival.

    In 2000 Mooney released “Gone to Hell,” with special guest Dr. John adding some extra spice. The critics welcomed this comeback with open arms and high praise. Blues Access called the album “a seductive musical cocktail that leaves you deliriously drunk with pleasure every time.“ Blues Revue wrote, ”‘Gone to Hell’ bumps, grinds, and simmers with the emotional intensity of a musician who plays directly from his soul to yours.”

    His newest disc, “Big Ol’ Fiya” with special guest Jon Cleary has been a long time coming but Mooney has brought some profound musical styles and songwriting to his signature syncopated delta blues sound. If there was ever a Mooney CD to own, this one is truly it. By far his most heartfelt, intimate, soulful and incredibly intricate vocals, this is a John Mooney album that is simply like none other.

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Walter "Wolfman" Washington and the Roadmasters, Little Freddie King, Honey Island Swamp Band, With Special Guest John Mooney, and more!

Sat May 6 2017 9:00 PM

(Doors 8:00 PM)

Carver Theater New Orleans LA
Walter "Wolfman" Washington and the Roadmasters, Little Freddie King, Honey Island Swamp Band, With Special Guest John Mooney, and more!
  • Sorry, you missed this event.
  • Check out other similar events on TicketWeb.

Ages 21+

Great music begins with great songs, and great songs are what the Honey Island Swamp Band is all about. The band came together when Aaron Wilkinson (acoustic guitar, mandolin, vocals) and Chris Mulé (electric guitar, vocals) were marooned in San Francisco after the levee breaches following Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans. After a chance encounter with fellow New Orleans evacuees Sam Price (bass, vocals) and Garland Paul (drums, vocals), and with no prospects of getting home any time soon, they figured they’d better cook up something new, and quick!

Honey Island Swamp Band's music has been described as "Bayou Americana", with timeless songs from Wilkinson & Mulé, highlighted by Mulé's searing guitar, Wilkinson's sure-handed mandolin, and 4-part vocal harmonies, all anchored by the powerful groove of Price & Paul's Louisiana stomp rhythm section. The addition of Trevor Brooks on Hammond B-3 organ to the HISB family in 2010 has rounded out the band’s sound, which draws from a variety of influences in the world of roots music.

Walter “Wolfman” Washington has been a mainstay on the New Orleans music scene.  He cut his teeth backing up some of the best singers and performers in New Orleans history before putting together his long time band The Roadmasters who have been burning down and burning up local and national stages since their first gigs in the 1980s.  His guitar style combines both rhythm and blues, blues, New Orleans funk, and modern jazz into a way of playing that is uniquely his.  His singing is emotional and heartfelt.  His guitar work is intricate, intimate, and full.  There is a little Bobby Blue Bland, a little Kenny Burrell, a little George Benson, a little church, and a lot of New Orleans charm and experience in a Walter Wolfman Washington performance. And in this day and age of musicians imitating the past or trying to recreate it, The Wolfman stands out as a musician steeped in the history but completely contemporary.  Few musical acts, if any, do what he does.  He is real, authentic, and unique.

Little Freddie King is a country-style blues musician, of an era when live music poured from the back-of-town nightclubs throughout New Orleans’ African-American neighborhoods, fostering a subculture of downhome Mississippi blues that developed from the ground up in New Orleans. He is also one of the few survivors and the last of what has become a footnote to the Great Migration of Southern blacks: the Mississippi country bluesmen who carried their tradition farther south rather than north.

"You Made My Night" is Little Freddie King's way of saying "thank you" to his rowdy, enthusiastic audience after one of his classic low down and dirty blues performances. This recording features authentic "juke-joint" music in which perfect pitch and well-tuned guitars just don't matter. He's got a rough Mississippi roots electric sound with a New Orleans edge. His brand of the blues is moonshine dripping from the back porch, still-made from the remnants of the Delta farm, until jumping a train to N.O. His sound is harsh,dirty and powerfully authentic