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SUSTO
with Skyway Man

Friday, Jun 16, 2017 8:30 PM CDT (7:30 PM Doors)
SPACE, Evanston, IL

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GA Standing Room Only

$15.00
General admission standing room only. No seats.

Delivery Type:

UPS 2nd Day $14.50 -  No P.O. Boxes, U.S. addresses only.
Please allow 2-3 business days for UPS 2nd Day delivery.
Mail $2.50 -  Please allow 10 days for Mail delivery.
Will Call Check in electronically at venue box office.

Terms and Conditions:

**Please note fees include Evanston and Cook County amusement tax.** We want to make sure that all patrons know what to expect when attending events at SPACE. Please note that not all tickets guarantee seats. Seating varies show by show, so please pay attention to the description of the seating level that you select. A "Reserved Table Seat" guarantees one seat at a cabaret table. Every individual in your party needs a ticket in that section in order to sit at your table. Table seats are held until one hour after the start time of the show. Reserved Table Seats and any will-call tickets are non transferable - the name of the person ordering must match the name of the person picking up the tickets. A “GA Limited Seating” ticket guarantees access to the concert, but does not guarantee a seat. Seating is available on a limited, first-come, first-served basis. If seating is absolutely necessary to you, please purchase a Reserved Table Seat. For certain shows, we will have a "GA Seated" section, which guarantees a chair, but no table. Seats for this section are guaranteed until showtime. A “GA Dance Floor” or “Standing Room” ticket is just that. There is absolutely no seating in either of these sections. Please do not purchase a ticket in these sections if you will be unable to stand for the duration of the show. Doors for concerts open one hour before the start time of the show. SPACE reserves the right to change the start time, or to add performers to a lineup. Ticket buyers will be emailed with any major changes. No outside food or drinks are permitted. Pizzas from Union Pizzeria can be brought into the concert. SPACE has a full bar and cocktail service during shows. Flash photography is not permitted in SPACE. This is a listening room, and it is important to us that performers are able to be heard. Patrons talking during quiet shows may be asked to step outside so others can enjoy the show. SPACE is an all-ages venue, but patrons must be 21 to drink alcoholic beverages. No refunds will be given under any circumstances. By continuing with this purchase, you acknowledge that you have read and understood the terms and conditions stated above.

 I understand and accept these terms.

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Additional Information

Justin Osborne needed a break. 

He'd been writing music and making albums since he was 15, and by the age of 26, he felt like he was spinning his wheels. He knew he needed a change, so he ended his old band Sequoyah Prep School and moved to Cuba. He thought he might be done with music for a while, but the songs just kept coming. 

"I had this idea in my mind that I was going to try and join some kind of Latin American Leftist movement. I wanted to jump off a cliff," Osborne says. "Once I got there I immediately started hanging out with musicians and going to shows. I started showing them the songs from this project that was kind of just an idea in my head. 

"They were like, 'man, don't throw away your passport, go home and continue to make music,'" he says. "I was encouraged by them to try again." 

Osborne ended the relationship he was in, started touring and writing constantly and eventually dropped out of school with just one paper and exam left to finish. He also made an aesthetic upgrade, getting the words "Acid Boys" tattooed across his knuckles. 

"I was always afraid of committing fully to the idea of trying to make it. I think in some ways, that's what held my old band back. I thought maybe I'll go to school and I'll be an anthropologist and go live abroad," he says. "Then I did all that, and I realized no, I need to go back to what I'm good at. I got the knuckle tattoos to keep me out of everything else." 

Osborne was already writing the songs for what would be SUSTO's 2014 self-titled debut when his producer Wolfgang Zimmerman introduced him to Johnny Delaware, a guitarist and songwriter who had moved to Charleston, South Carolina to make an album with the producer. 

"We started meshing and gelling really well. We liked aspects of what each other did, so as the record started to really take shape in the studio, Johnny came in and really played a key role in that," Osborne says. "At that point, it became one step closer to being a band thing." 

SUSTO is a Spanish word referring to a folk illness in Latin America that Osborne learned as anthropology student, meaning "when your soul is separated from your body," and also roughly translates to a panic attack. For Osborne, the music of SUSTO was something he had to get out into the world. 

"Going through my life I was just lost, and I didn't have direction, and I wanted direction," he says. Raised in Puddin' Swamp, South Carolina, Osborne moved to Charleston to attend military school, and didn't really get to experience much of the city -- one of the main artistic hubs of the South -- until he left his junior year to tour with his first band. 

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