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Weston Burt with The Bama Gamblers
Peachtree Tavern Presents

Weston Burt
with The Bama Gamblers

Weston Burt The Bama Gamblers

Friday, Aug 02, 2013 10:00 PM EDT 2013-08-02T22:00 (9:00 PM Doors)
- Saturday, Aug 03, 2013 1:00 AM EDT 2013-08-03T1:00
, Atlanta, GA
21 years and over

10.0 10.0
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Alabama has produced its share of country-music stars, and with the emergence of Weston Burt, the state may be poised to add another to its pedigree. Born in Fort Payne—the home of iconic supergroup Alabama—Weston is a commanding performer steeped in the traditions of Southern rock and country. For the 27-year-old singer and songwriter, the stage is his home. “There is nothing I love more than to play,” says Weston, who first embarked on his career in music while attending college at Auburn University. In addition to his regular class load, Weston played a staggering 150 dates a year—everywhere from fraternity parties to clubs—developing a reputation as a dazzling performer, as well as a tireless work ethic. “I’ve been plugging away at this for years. I didn’t breeze into town expecting a record deal right away, but it happened almost immediately,” he says of his deal with Ramblin’ Records, who are prepping Weston’s debut album for release next year. Armed with songs “Now That She’s Gone,” a chugging rocker about leaving a less-than-agreeable girlfriend, the tongue-in-cheek “We Should Break Up,” and fiery ballad “No Way Not To,” Weston is ready to establish himself as country’s next breakout male vocalist. “I love music with variety. If you listen to a Garth Brooks album, who is a hero of mine, he had all kinds of songs: slow, fast, mid-tempo. I try to cover all of that on my album,” he says. Along with Garth, Weston cites Lynyrd Skynyrd and, of course, Alabama as influences. In fact, he learned to play guitar to Alabama songs. “The first song I ever learned was ‘Dixieland Delight,’” he says. “Just being from the same place as they were made me realize that it was possible to make it. With Alabama, I saw that it could happen.” In a way, it has already happened for Weston. His time working the concert circuit during college left him with a certain feeling of success. “I made a pretty decent living then,” he admits. But now, Weston is ready for the national stage. “I’m a hard-working guy from Alabama who loves country music,” he says. “And I’m ready for my shot.”