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Jimmy Eat World with David Bazan and Band
Mercy Lounge & AC Entertainment

Jimmy Eat World
with David Bazan and Band

Jimmy Eat World David Bazan and Band

Friday, Feb 18, 2011 8:00 PM CST 2011-02-18T20:00 (7:00 PM Doors)
, Nashville, TN
18 years and over

27.0 27.0
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In today's prefab pop idol marketplace, there must be more pre-teen would-be superstars than ever, all vying for that elusive major-label contract. Hell, they even have prime time TV shows about it! For the members of Jimmy Eat World, however, having released two major-label albums before hitting legal drinking age, the freedom from that same contract would put the Mesa, Ariz., foursome on the path to its very finest work: Bleed American, Jimmy Eat World's fourth LP and first for DreamWorks Records, recorded on the band's own dime in the aftermath of the band's being dropped from their previous label.
"There was no record company, no A and R guy, no manager-- just us," says singer- guitarist Jim Adkins. "We looked at the whole thing as a liberating experience, rather than part of any deliberate plan."
Indeed, record-industry fate had effectively given Jimmy Eat World a new lease on life. After the band's split with the label in August 1999, they commemorated their independence with a self-promoted, five-week tour of Europe, their first ever. That the erstwhile record company had not released Jimmy Eat World material overseas was hardly an obstacle: Ever resourceful, the band simply purchased their own records directly from the distributor and shipped them to Europe independently.
"The best thing that company ever did for us was to buy us a van," recalls drummer Zach Lind, demonstrating the band's enduring positivity. "We really got their money's worth out of it. We treated touring like guerrilla warfare, which had other benefits aside from just saving money; it forced us to interact with people who had a real interest in the band's success, to make friends as well as fans. Even when we were on a major, we always acted like we weren't; we acted like an indie band. Our attitude was, 'So what if we don't have the support of our label? We have the support of our fans.'

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