TicketWeb Phone Sales : You are currently logged in as | customer lookup | Sign Out
The Smoking Flowers plus Escondido : Nashville Sunday Night presented by Lightning 100 & Yuengling
3rd and Lindsley

The Smoking Flowers plus Escondido
: Nashville Sunday Night presented by Lightning 100 & Yuengling

The Smoking Flowers Escondido Nashville Sunday Night presented by Lightning 100 & Yuengling

Sunday, Jan 20, 2013 8:00 PM CST 2013-01-20T20:00 (6:00 PM Doors)
, Nashville, TN

10.0 10.0
Share Venue Directions

Purchase Tickets

We're sorry, there are no tickets currently available through TicketWeb.


Additional Information

THE SMOKING FLOWERS:

Though Scott Collins doesn’t say that going to Graceland to see Elvis Presley in his coffin influenced his future as a musician, it’s hard to believe it didn’t have an undeniable effect on his 3-year-old self. For Kim Collins, her future career as a singer/songwriter may have been a bit more predestined. For Kim, who grew up with a mother who was a singer and guitarist in a folk band, The Travelers, in the sixties, it was probably bred in the bone.

 

The two played and toured together for several years in an edgy alt-country band, Pale Blue Dot, before they ever truly wrote their first song together, “Someday.” Out of that, the couple says, came The Smoking Flowers, Kim and Scott Collins’s East Nashville-based band, a hybrid blend of rock, blues, country, and an American sound Kim calls Southern Gothic folk.

 

When you listen to The Smoking Flowers, leave any preconceived notions behind, because if you think you’re listening to country, they’ll switch to rock. Or they’ll lull you in with a gentle waltz tempo, then come in with vocals that are reminiscent of punk. And the exquisite harmonies will certainly grab you. For this husband-and-wife duo, living together, working together, writing together and playing together unite to form a sound that’s distinctly theirs.

 

ESCONDIDO:

Escondido is Nashville, TN based artists Jessica Maros and Tyler James. Recorded live in a single day, their 10-song debut album is due out Feb. 2013.  Their sound is a washed out desert landscape steeped in American roots music.  “We wanted it to be like Clint Eastwood playing pop songs at one of the honky-tonks downtown,” James mused. “But we’ve been told it sounds like desert sex.”

 

Escondido’s songs range from the Tom Petty/Fleetwood Mac influenced pop numbers Cold October and Bad Without You, to the lovelorn country ballads Special Enough and Willow Tree.  “The record was an outlet for me,” says Maros. “Each song brings back where I was, what I drank when I was writing them.  It was a dark time and this album got me through it.”  The band’s heavy sentiment is balanced out by the playful twang of songs like Don’t Love Me Too Much and the Keep Walkin'.  “Music helps us forget the very conflict it grows out of,” says James. “But my favorite songs embrace that dissonance.”